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Around The World is a collection of our favorite brands from across the globe, chosen by our buyers for their uniquely international take on fashion.

Where do you live?
In France, nearby Le Mont St. Michel in Normandy.

When did you found Le Mont St. Michel?
The brand was established in 1913. I fell in love with the company and its Old World identity and decided to give it a new face by reinforcing a new modern attitude and spirit of living behind the company's heritage.

What sparked the creation of your line?
Family heritage and knowledge of knits. I was born in a factory and grew up around clothing; I have always been surrounded by knitwear.

What are some influences behind your designs?
French style, the French way of living, rock music and Parisian women.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
I think she loves fashion, but most of all she wants to create her own look and style. She knows how to dress in an easy and refined way.

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
This winter, I really love the Aztec-style cardigan. We were really influenced by wild America's open spaces and Native American peoples, the idea of a quest in nature and the search for freedom.

What is your favorite part about living in France?
Well, France s a very balanced country. Quite small but quite diverse and with a nice quality of living. French culture and history is very important to everyone here—it belongs to us. We're very proud of that. Living in France is just great!

How would you describe French style?
A balanced mix of personal style, great culture and heritage. Seductive but smooth, cute rather than overly sexy. It would take too long to express all that I feel about French style! Maybe the best thing I can say is that, for us, style and elegance will always trump comfort and casual in France. Fashion is everywhere here. It is in our way of living.

Is there anything about your line that denotes a French influence?
The thing that speaks most to a French sense of style is probably our mix of moods. Take a silk dress or blouse and warm it up with a chunky knit in camel-hair yarn. We like to find little elements that are unexpected—this is very typical of the French sensibility. For us, this means taking the feminine and putting it with something from a different world, like an old archive LMSM engineer coat, for a new twist.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
They must visit Le Mont St. Michel, which is a famous French national monument. The town has a beautiful old abbey from the 13th century. It's surrounded by the sea, and when the tide is high it looks as if it's just washed out all the way to the sky!

Where is Le Mont St. Michel and what's the most beautiful thing about it?
The building we work in is from the turn of the century, and working in that environment makes you feel strong and proud of your roots. When the tide is high on the rock and the sea surrounds the abbey...it is just magical and unique.

Every beautiful sweater should be...
Hand washed please!

Where do you live?
Stockholm, Sweden

When did you found MiniMarket?
Me and my sisters made our first collection for Autumn/Winter 2006. The collection consisted of seven styles and no accessories.

What sparked the creation of your line?
We had a shop together during the years before starting the label. We used to sell clothes created uniquely for us by various Scandinavian designers. When we lacked a skirt or a certain type of dress, we made it ourselves together with a pattern constructor. Our own designed items started to sell very well, and soon other shops started calling, wanting to buy our own designs.

What are some influences behind your designs?
Strong women, everyday-life and the spectacular phenomena this planet has to offer. We are much into digging into and learning about various cultures, as well as flora and fauna.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
Our clothes are worn by curious people with a lot of integrity. The clothes can be dressed up as well as down, they are not trend items—they stay in your wardrobe season after season.

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
For AW10, we are all crazy about the gold beaded items, and the printed dresses and jackets. Also, the shoes with curved heel are amazing.

What is your favorite part about living in Stockholm?
That you have closeness to the countryside, and that it's a small city which gives you time to breathe. You don't have to be cool all the time here, it's more relaxed than many bigger cities.

How would you describe Swedish style?
The classic Swedish style is clean cuts and earthly colors. We have the clean cuts in us, but we prefer colors and patterns.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
Millesgården—the old home of my favorite Swedish sculptor Carl Milles. You can take a stroll in his amazing old garden with all his huge sculptures and then you can have a lunch with wine in the lovely restaurant. For day two, I would recommend a steamboat trip.

What is the birth order of the sisters?
Sofie, 22nd of June 1978
Pernilla and Jennifer, 19th of June 1985

What were your favorite things to wear when you were little girls?
When we were really small, our mother made our clothes, very early 20th century style with laced things and correct, pretty girly wear. Pernilla was always clad in blue or green, Jennifer in red or pink, for people to tell them apart.

Is anyone else from the family involved in the business?
Our whole family is. Our father is still a member of our board, even now that we have investors.

Where do you live?
Stockholm, Sweden

What sparked the creation of your line?
Sexy knits and dresses in contrasts like leather and silk in one dress combined, or silk velvet dresses with leather combinations, but I think we do great with knitwear.

What are some influences behind your designs?
Our heritage of our late grandmother Dagmar, in combination with our urban contemporary lifestyle in Stockholm.

What are some things that you remember her wearing that you really liked?
She always had the feeling to mix her look so she was very stylish, she looked very arty, mixed prints with each other, and she mixed fabrics like silk dresses with heavy knits. And the best thing was that she always made her own clothes in the nicest fabrics and loveliest colors.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
All kinds of fantastic women around the world. Urban women who have high integrity and strong personality and don´t want to look like anybody. I truly believe women get a lot of energy and power in our clothes.

What is your favorite part about living in Stockholm?
The open mindness about anything from art to women's lib.

How would you describe Swedish style?
Ohh, difficult one...there are many different styles you know. But the urban look is probably very fashion forward in a bit relaxed way. I guess we are very much aware of what we wear, haha.

Is there anything about your line that denotes a Swedish influence?
Yes, absolutely. There are clean parts of our design that are typically Swedish I think, even if Dagmar always wants to have the mix of unconventional and sophistication.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
They should go to Gamla Stan, Djurgarden and Skeppsholmen—three beautiful places filled with culture, art and history.

How do you divide the responsibilities between the three sisters?
We all have our different experiences: Sofia sales, Karin marketing and production, and Kristina design. We mix everything and help each other, so we overlap but it is nice to have our own areas that we work with.

In what ways are the three of you most alike?
We are very much alike—social people who like nice things in life, food, nice wines, spending a lot of time together, we like pretty much the same clothes, skiing, sailing and so on. We don´t like each other when we discuss skirt lengths! Haha! We always have different opinions. We are actually from three different decades: 60s, 70s, and 80s. That´s very nice and we do have a lot of friends together. We love partying together, it´s a lot of fun. I think we are best on that!

Where do you live?
In a typical Parisian apartment with wonderful big windows.

When did you begin collaborating with A.P.C.?
Jean [Touitou] was introduced to me by Christopher Niquet, and we started with a hand painted and stenciled skirt, which then led to customizing A.P.C. stock, and then on to the Madras line.

What sparked the creation of Madras?
A trip to India where we both were inspired by fabrics, colors and working with a group that had a strong ideal for its workers.

What are some influences behind your designs?
The starting point is fabric, print and texture, and then the concept is still a line of playful and easy pieces.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
It's a wide range, from teenage girls onward. I give Mum pieces, and then also I see teenagers hanging around in them.

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
For winter, it has to be the silk jumpsuit.

What is your favorite part about living in France?
The life. I find my friends have more time for savoring life, not just running through it.

How would you describe French style?
I adore the everyday chic of the older ladies, elegant but for everyday.

Is there anything about your line that denotes a French influence?
The collaboration with A.P.C. itself. They know Parisian style inside out as well as it being part of their DNA.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
Marche des Enfants Rouges for lunch, Le marché aux Puces de Vanves for antiques, Palais Royal for boutiques and architecture, the Marasi for small vintage shops...Just walking around is a treat here.

What fashion icons best represent the spirit of French fashion?
Lou Doillion and Camille Bidault-Waddington.

What makes a certain style a classic?
The date of making is never relevant.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
The Rodebjer girl can be found anywhere. She is youthful without being young and mature without being old. She is open-minded and elegant in an unaffected way.  She cares about inner style as well as outer style.

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
My favorites are a top made out of Art-Deco patterned lace and a pair of flower printed pants.

What is your favorite part about living in Stockholm?
The combination of a city with the closeness to nature.

How would you describe Swedish style?
Functional, sober and modern.

Is there anything about your line that denotes a Swedish influence?
A little bit of all, but intensified with a metropolitan spark.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
To the Rodebjer store and to the Modern Museum of Art. I would have dinner at Mathias Dahlgren restaurant and a drink at Grand Hotel.

You started out studying fashion at FIT, but then dropped out when your line took off. Can you tell us a little bit about that?
I have never been a keen friend of schools, so I decided to study everything I had to know to be able to open my own label. When I felt I had the knowledge I needed, and when my line started to take off, I decided to go with the flow.

How long did you live in New York? What made you decide to return to Sweden?
I lived in New York for two years and I loved it but to be able to handle my own label I needed the support from my family and friends. I had to work day and night and I chose to spend no money on rent in a smaller city like Stockholm.

What is your favorite aspect of designing?
I love to be able to visualize something that we still haven´t seen and I love to capture the moment and time through my work.

Where do you live?
I am living in Copenhagen, close to the center, in a quiet and peaceful area with a view over the lakes of Copenhagen.

When did you found Stine Goya?
The company was founded in Copenhagen in 2006. At the outset of starting my own brand it was simply to contribute my own aesthetic and approach to design without regard to another's pre-conceived vision or brand profile. My ambition with the company has always been to move forward, and not succumb to established trends in a bid to capitalize on them.

What sparked the creation of your line?
Design was always the ultimate goal. I started modeling and styling, and in 2005 I graduated from Central St. Martins, College of Art & Design in London, where I majored in fashion print.
My time as fashion editor of Danish fashion magazine Cover was a fantastic opportunity, which turned up on my return to Denmark after I'd finished my degree. After working in those different areas of fashion for many years, I decided I wanted to start my own line. I feel these dallies into other areas of fashion have been very influential in the way I approach my work as a designer—they have given me invaluable insight in terms of the facets of the industry, which makes the work into a larger context.

What are some influences behind your designs?
I can find inspiration in a wide array of places, and previous collections have drawn on such different things as the movie Spellbound by Hitchcock to the atmosphere of extravagance and decadence that permeates the Hamptons.

I want the clothing to be sophisticated yet understated; each collection formed around a certain universe. The essence of my designs lie in the visual portrayal of an emotion or a tone, inspired by a wide spectrum of contemporary and classical sources. The striking prints are a central characteristic of my designs, and often refer to the dominant sources of inspiration, further illustrating the underlying tone of a collection. They are the essence of the brand Stine Goya.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
There is no one Stine Goya girl, but perhaps a girl who is not afraid to wear clothes with shapes and colors and is extremely trend conscious but not afraid to break the norms of fashion as well.
I think my designs have a relatively wide appeal, both in the realm of age and type. I try to design for the individual rather than seeking to converge with mass trends, and I find it interesting how the clothing is taken out of the context of a collection and combined with a woman's wardrobe in a personal interpretation.

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
From the Spring/Summer 2011 collection my favorite piece is the Rose dress with a print called Wonderland. The colors are dusty and light, and the shapes on the print and the tone-in-tone effects give the collection a unique and complete expression.

What is your favorite part about living in Copenhagen?
The Danish mentality is so easy to live with. I also think that Copenhagen is a beautiful city with so many places to go, offering something metropolitan with a small and cozy feeling as well.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
I would tell them to go to the center of Copenhagen were we have some of Copenhagen's oldest, most beautiful and extraordinary buildings. Copenhagen is also a good place for shopping and relaxing in the lovely parks as well. I would also suggest visiting Christianshavn, which is most known for Christiania, but also its pleasant and relaxing atmosphere which characterizes the overall mood.

How long did you model and who did you model for?
I was modeling for five years, and I did shows for Chanel, Kenzo, Veronique Branquihno, etc.

Does your modeling background influence the way you design?
It has nuanced my work and given me a solid understanding, not only of the protected universe which one creates in the unity of a collection but also the interpretation of fashion by a plethora of other contributors to the fashion industry. It is important to me that my pieces have strength of design, which makes them interesting, also when it is taken out of the stylistic empowerment of a collection.

Where do you live?
In the land down under. Not Australia—we're the cooler, younger, sexier cousin called New Zealand.

When did you found Stolen Girlfriends Club?
In May 2005. We just celebrated our fifth birthday this year by showing at Sydney Fashion Week.

What sparked the creation of your line?
An art exhibition with the same name started it all. People just loved the name and theme.

What are some influences behind your designs?
Music is huge to us, romance is massive, quirky wit is ever present, if not underlying. We always have a certain girl or guy in mind when we design. This changes each season, so next season she will be a little angel that goes out to parties past her bedtime and falls asleep on the floor. She wakes up with cigarette butts in her hair, but doesn't care because that's how she rolls.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
A confident, sexy girl that loves to do things differently. The only question she asks herself is "Why not?" We love her.

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
The cable-knit shorts. Put them over some tights and they are no longer porno. They are a unique take on hot pants and let's face it—these days it's hard to be unique with anything.

What is your favorite part about living in New Zealand?
The space! Have you seen New Zealand? We have huge rolling green hills that topple over into oceans. We can go snowboarding during the morning and then surf in the afternoon. I also like how we are somewhat detached from the world. It keeps our fashion pretty fresh, I think.

How would you describe New Zealander style?
Totally diverse. It depends on what part you live in. Some dress for survival or lifestyle, and others dress for self-expression. We just tend to put our own twist on things.

Is there anything about your line that denotes a New Zealand influence?
Lots of black! The rest I feel has an international feel to it though. We are a niche brand so our market is a tiny percentage of the population. When you're talking a population of four million in New Zealand, we need to depend on exporting to a global market.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
Go to Dizengoff Café on Ponsonby Road for breakfast. Takapuna Beach Café for lunch, then shopping at "Black Box" in the department store after eating. For dinner, back to Ponsonby Road at a place called S.P.Q.R.—ask for a waiter named Nate, an amazingly funny guy. After dinner, you can go right next door to a bar called Ponsonby Social Club. Get an espresso martini if you're a little tired.

Where does your line's name come from?
It was an art show theme. We thought of a gang that would rescue girls from shitty boyfriends. Yes, we are romantic idealists.

Who's better looking—Australians or New Zealanders?
New Zealanders! Way cooler accent, and we have lots of brunettes. Don't you love brunettes?

Where do you live?
Copenhagen,Noerrebro Area...neighbour-house to the Wood Wood office.

When did you join Wood Wood?
More or less in the very beginning, in 2003, first helping out the boys with sewing and printing , then it became more steady and full time, with my first girls collection in 2005.

What are some influences behind your designs?
For AW10, there was a mix of grungy and buffalo influences. Animalistic and rustic visuals. Definitely ‘90s fascination and, as always, the woodwood girl type is a bit tomboyish-feminine.

What kind of girl do you imagine wearing your collection?
A self-confident  individual, sexy tomboy. Casual and aware of urban time waves. She doesn't loose her femininity by wearing a rather boy-inspired look. She is into sneakers, flats and heels.

How does the woodwood women's collection reflect the men's, and vice-versa?
We share a few prints and fabrics and the casual street looks, but girls tend to go more fashion and boys tend to go more sporty. The girls borrow into the  boys styles. M65 parkas, bumper-jackets...

What is your favorite piece from your collection?
My favorite items are the long, black "Eve" coat in sandwashed silk, or the long , green melange "Eve" cardy-dress in fine wool. Also I love the "Violetta" shirt in animal printed cotton, and I would wear it buttoned up under a cardy or blazer.

How would you describe Danish style?
We've always been considered the more exotic country of Scandinavia, and I guess we are a bit more colorful, printed and avant-garde than our neighboring Swedes or Norwegians. Though the casual jean-tee-sweat-look is also very preferred. We are very sunglass-happy, which can be quite amusing.

Is there anything about your line that denotes a Danish influence?
The fabrics we use are mainly cottons and wools, and as pure compositions as possible. Simple details and cuts. Very are rarely shiny or exaggerated. Like in the Danish furniture heritage, there is sort of a "close to nature" feel to it, but in a very urban version.

If a visitor only had a weekend in your city, where would you tell them to go?
Copenhagen is so small, that almost everything is in walking/biking distance. I'd rent a bike and cycle around from area to area, and cross the city-bridges. Copenhagen is surrounded by water and the skyline is quite low. I'd go to Nørrebro and Vesterbro and Christianshavn/Holmen where Christiania is situated.  Christiania is a social experiment with self-government and a democracy based on dialogue replacing majority voting. Christiania was started in some abandoned army barracks in Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1971.

What is the most fun thing about being a fashion designer?
It's not only fun and glamour. It's hard work. To me the most fun and stimulating thing is to create and play with colors and fabrics and prints and, with that, to make the big puzzle work. I prefer partying with my colleagues rather than going to some fashion event. I enjoy observing the exhibitionist crowd rather than being a part of it.