• UO Interviews: The Print Shop


    We searched high and low for the amazing artists, photographers, and designers whose inspiring work makes up our all-new Print Shop. Get to know a handful of the artists here.
     





    Shown above: Black and White Flowers Art Print

    Debbie Carlos

    Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

    Sure. My name is Debbie Carlos and I’m an artist. I dabble in many things but mostly work in photography and (more recently) ceramics. I also design jewelry on the side. I work out of my home studio in Michigan.

    How did you first get started in art?
    I’ve always had a penchant for doodling and drawings growing up. I took my first photo class at summer camp when I was 13 or 14 and was hooked. I was the only kid in my class with a point and shoot Olympus while everyone else had a proper 35mm SLR. I feel like that casual, spontaneous aesthetic and practice remains with me today.

    What kind of things are you drawn to when creating your photos/illustrations?
    The scope of my work tends to be a personal documentation of everyday life. I love the strange and beautiful moments that can occur if you pay attention. The way someone absentmindedly leaves a head of cabbage in an open kitchen drawer or the weird iridescent light reflections when the sun hits your phone just right. It’s like finding a bit of magic or discovering the sublime in the super normal.

    Can you tell us some of your current inspirations?
    I am always inspired by plants and nature and the sky. I love the work of Rinko Kawauchi. These days, I can’t seem to get enough of shapes and colors in bright & poppy hues.

    One thing you couldn’t live without?
    My cat, Mei.

    One piece of advice for aspiring artists out there?
    Don’t be afraid to try new things, trust your instincts, and embrace your mistakes. Just keep going.




    Shown above: County Line Art Print



    Max Wanger

    Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
    I was born and raised by reformed hippies. Educated in Los Angeles, Honolulu and the here and there of Tokyo. I'm a lover of lazy Sundays, mismatched socks, negative space, green tea and last but almost certainly first, my wife Margaux and our little boy, Dash.

    How did you first get started in art?
    Having grown up in a very creative household, I always thought I was “supposed” to be an artist, or a musician, or a designer of some sort. Taking photographs has always been one of my outlets. From an early age, I felt like I could disappear behind the lens and observe the world. I’d imagine no one else was seeing what I was seeing. I suppose that’s the beauty of photography: everyone sees the world differently. My photography career was built out of the need to follow my bliss.

    What kind of things are you drawn to when creating your photos/illustrations?
    Wide open spaces and pops of color.

    Can you tell us some of your current inspirations?
    Rodney Smith, Pharrell, the ocean.

    One thing you couldn’t live without?
    Family.

    One piece of advice for aspiring artists out there?
    Keep your head down and don't listen to all the chatter out there. Do what you want, break the rules, color outside the lines. Be different. Trust your instincts. Follow your heart.





    Shown above: Hamsa Art Print


    Barbara Dziadosz

    Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
    My name is Barbara and I'm a freelancing illustrator from Hamburg. Originally from Poland, my family moved to Hamburg when I was two years old. I started my studies in illustration straight after school and specialized in screenprinting and character design a while back. Nowadays I work for several magazines in editorial and work on some book projects.

    How did you first get started in art?
    Like most people, I drew as a kid and just never stopped since then.

    What kinds of things are you drawn to when creating your illustrations?
    Basically anything that comes to my mind! I'm pretty open to everything.

    Can you tell us some of your current inspirations?
    I'm very influenced by vintage illustrations from all over the world. I admire Russian avant-garde illustrators like Boris Ermelenko, the bold works of Fernand Nathan, Olle Eskell, Leonard Weisgard, Alice and Martin Provensen, Miroslav Sasek, Art Seiden, Arnold Edwin Bare, and many, many more.

    One thing you couldn't live without?
    Not being allowed to work as an illustrator.

    One piece of advice for aspiring artists out there?
    Keep yourself busy!





    Shown above: Golden Palm Tree Art Print


    Wilder California

    Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?
    I am a visual artist from the San Francisco Bay Area. I have always been intrigued by the beauty and diversity of the California landscape. My goal is to make work that brings that beauty and diversity into the home.

    How did you first get started in art?
    I studied fine art photography in the San Francisco Bay Area. I also grew up in a family of photographers who have a great appreciation for the California landscape.

    What kind of things are you drawn to when creating your photos/illustrations?
    I’m drawn to the changing landscape and our relationship to it - light moving through space, subtlety in color, and how plants change throughout the season are what draw me toward them.

    Can you tell us some of your current inspirations?
    Being outside as much as possible and the movement to be more present and caring human beings is what motivates my artistic practice. I also see a shift in how people want to furnish their homes and what they want to buy - there seems to be movement to buy local and support artists from one’s community. I am inspired by the local artists that live around me everyday!

    One thing you couldn’t live without?
    I couldn’t live without my camera (of course)!

    One piece of advice for aspiring artists out there?
    Just keep going….. keep making things and try and find what makes you happy.




    Shown above: Green Paddle Cactus Art Print


    Jessica Rowe

    Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?

    I was born in Cali, but grew up in Arizona. I’ve lived here most of my life, except for about three years living in Germany. I went to ASU where my major was interior design. I’m still obsessed with interiors, but figured out pretty quick that it wasn’t something I wanted to do for a living.

    How did you first get started in art?
    I’ve been drawing forever but never thought I’d be able to do anything with it on any sort of professional level. As a kid, I used to spends hours a day just sketching with pencil. I’d never worked with paints much until about five years ago when I picked up a watercolor kit on a whim. I was just messing around and started sharing the pieces I’d done on a design blog I was running at the time. I was overwhelmed by the response. A ton of people were asking to buy pieces so I just kept going with it and selling prints and it’s just taken off from there. I feel very lucky and thankful to be able to buy groceries doing what I love.

    What kind of things are you drawn to when creating your photos/illustrations?
    I love black and white for the digital illustrations, or really colorful objects for the watercolors. Usually simple, easily identifiable objects that give me nice planes in which I can let the watercolor kind of do its own thing. I tend to do things that are monochromatic so I can play with the whole range of any given color.

    Can you tell us some of your current inspirations?
    Right now I’m really into botanicals. Love painting big palms leaves and cacti. Especially living in the desert, there’s so much cactus inspiration everywhere. I’ve also started experimenting with abstracts, just so I can play with pure color and shape and just let it flow.

    One thing you couldn’t live without?
    Music. I’ve got music going all day. I don’t think I could paint without it. Right now it’s mostly Beach House, iamamiwhoami, and ESKMO on repeat.

    One piece of advice for aspiring artists out there?
    Just put yourself out there. Share your work as much as possible and try not to judge yourself too harshly. I’ve been shocked at the response to some of the pieces that I didn’t even love that much. You never know what people are going to respond to. Sometimes we’re just too close to our own work to judge it properly.

    Also, never work for free in exchange for the promise of “exposure”. All creatives starting out in the business get asked this at one point. It’s a scam - don’t do it. If someone’s making money off your work directly or using it to promote their business, you deserve to get paid just like they are because your work is valuable too.


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