• Dreamers + Doers: College Marketplace


    We put a call out earlier this year looking for college artists interested in showing their work at our stores, and did you guys deliver! We received plenty of submissions from artists wanting to show off their work at the newly created UO Marketplace, which will provide local college artists with a platform to sell and promote everything they've been working on. After looking through hundreds of applicants, we selected a talented group to sell their wares at the pop-ups happening in ten different cities this month, and a few grand prize winners who will be showcased on the Urban Outfitters website, meaning that their goods will be available to the entire internet.

    We spoke to some of the winning artists that will be showcased online to find out a little bit more about their products, their inspirations and their backgrounds.

    Kristina Mast:




    Tell us a little bit about your background.

    I grew up on a quaint little horse farm in beautiful Lancaster County, PA. I recently graduated from Penn State with a Drawing and Painting BFA and Psychology Minor. I became quite interested in also working in clay during my last year, so now I am taking some time there to further my study in ceramics. I have been driven to make since I was very young and have always felt the need to keep my hands busy.

    What is your creative process like?

    I aim for my work to express rawness, strangeness, and sensitivities, but also delight. My process is very much an interdisciplinary one - I learn things from making my paintings that go into my ceramics, and vice versa. Play is an important part of my work, and often times the finished product becomes much different than expected.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    I find inspiration in real things that are not always seen as beautiful, such as the patterns of fungus on a park bench, old and flaking layers of paint, or the nervous quiver of someone’s voice. I like things that show evidence of their existence, that have acquired some mark of trauma or event. Brainstorming for me is exploring in nature or having an honest conversation with a friend. Lately I’ve been inspired by the spaces we occupy. 

    What are you most proud of?

    I'm most proud of my ability to grow and learn. My biggest challenges are probably my own internal struggles and fears and how they might affect my art making.

    Follow Kristina on Instagram
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    Scott Goodson:




    Tell us a little bit about your background.

    I'm Scott Goodson, the creator behind Citizen Home Décor. I grew up in the heart of the desert in Phoenix, Arizona. I'm a husband, graduate student, woodworker, coffee connoisseur, and handmade enthusiast. I attend graduate school at Arizona State University in their Real Estate Development program. While urban development and sustainability is important to me, I’m also very passionate about working with my hands and designing home décor pieces. I’ve always been into building things and have been tinkering with handmade lamps and décor pieces for years now. I started making state plaques and coasters as gifts for friends, and was encouraged by them to sell my pieces to local boutiques and open my own shop. During the spring of 2013 I established Citizen Home Décor and haven’t looked back since.

    What is your creative process like?

    My artwork is as much about my process as the end result. My ideas are simple and straightforward, and the details are found in the process. My process begins with the selection of wood type and design. I build each frame and design cutouts by hand. I’m very passionate about my process, and enjoy the time it takes to make each cut just right.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    I'm a supporter of local initiatives and really love expressing my state pride. I find inspiration in this movement, and I'm happy to be a part of it.

    What are you most proud of?

    That’s quite the daunting question! Well, at this point in my life and handmade career, I’m most proud of being able to contribute to the livelihood of my local arts community. The people of this community have been so encouraging and kind to me over the years, so it feels amazing to now be able to be more involved and help further the local arts movement in any way I can.

    How would you like to see your art out in the world?

    It gives me great pride to see Instagram snaps of my pieces hung up in people’s homes. To know that something I made is hanging in someone’s personal space and is bringing them joy, well, that’s incredibly special and humbling.

    Follow Scott on Instagram
    Follow Scott on Twitter

    Jenny Rose:






    Tell us a little bit about your background.

    I’m Jenny Rose, and I’m a senior studying fashion merchandising at Florida State University. I taught myself to knit when I was eight using sharpened #2 pencils as knitting needles. I got into selling when I was 17. I didn’t have a car, but I did have a shopping habit. Since the only jobs within walking or biking distance were food industry related, and I have a significant (possibly genetic - mom?) proclivity to spill, drop, or otherwise contaminate food, my simplest job solution—launch an e-commerce knitwear retail business! I used a Pink Floyd song title, Remember A Day, as a business name, as one does when one is 17. I had no idea that I’d knit over 1,000 pieces by hand over the next few years. It’s been very rewarding work, and I discovered a real passion for business, as well as a great endurance for knitting (knitting all-nighters with Netflix—a process I call Knitflixing, were exceedingly common).

    What is your creative process like?

    All of my pieces are very simple. I tell people, if I taught you to knit today, you could knit all my scarves. I’ve always been drawn to simplicity in design, and I like sort of juxtaposing that simplicity against chunky, textural, or otherwise colorful yarn. So the design process is pretty basic. That being said, my most popular piece, “The Manhattan Cowl” was designed by accident when I failed in my attempts to make a shawl one sleepless, Knitflixing night. You know in the Power Puff Girls how Chemical X got poured into the "girl" potion, and created unstoppable, mutant, crime-fighting little girls? It was exactly like that.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    I get inspired from old magazines, art, runway show archives, bloggers, and Pinterest. Good god, Pinterest. Cold weather really gets me going, too. I was once waiting outside for a class to start, in the freezing Tallahassee January weather (suspend your disbelief—Florida gets cold!), and I knitted a scarf for myself in 30 minutes.

    What are you most proud of?

    I’m pretty proud that I’ve knitted at least 1,000 pieces since 2011 and shipped my knits to over 4 continents, roughly 30 countries. I’ve been Etsy’s “Featured Seller.” I’ve gotten internships from this, like for Lucky Magazine and Into The Gloss. Knitting has just led me to so many wonderful things and people.

    How would you like to see your art out in the world?

    My dream is to see a stranger on the street wearing one of my knits, tackle him/her to the ground, and then of course, become best friends.

    Follow Jenny on Instagram
    See Jenny on Etsy

    Andrea Santos:





    Tell us a little bit about your background.

    I’m originally from New Bedford, MA, but currently living in Providence, RI as I work towards completing my MFA in printmaking at the Rhode Island School of Design. I also studied printmaking for my undergraduate, but at MassArt in Boston. Before choosing print as my studio focus, I was enrolled as a double major in fashion design and small metals. I wanted to become a costume designer, but I quickly became uninterested in the form-and-function fundamentals of those media; all I wanted was to draw and paint. I decided to try something in 2D fine arts and took a summer etching course out of curiosity. And since then I’ve never looked back! Printmaking is my purest passion and my outlet to combine my love for drawing, experimenting and working with a sculptural surface.

    What is your creative process like?

    My art making process usually begins with a lot of focused writing, followed by some less-focused experimentation in the studio. Sometimes I strongly feel like I need to make 50 small drawings to purge out ideas, while other times I sit at my desk for hours with only a notebook. I think my completed works are a combination of the two - some research-based thought processing and some clear-headed studio time. Experimenting at the printing press allows for a lot of thought-flow and discoveries as well. Trying different inking methods, layering transparencies or printing on materials alternative to paper has greatly informed my work.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    Living in a city, especially one as vibrant as Providence, is always an inspiration for me. There is a lot of creative energy here amongst visual artists, musicians, writers, performers and so many other talents. Aside from my current city surroundings and art school setting, I’ve been revisiting my History of Printmaking text books and referencing historical master works. I’ve also just returned from three months in Europe which was, needless to say, the most inspiring 90 days of my life. It was my first time abroad so my eyes were completely overstimulated with new colors, patterns and decorative architecture. I’m grateful that my travels have constituted a new positive influence on my artwork, and my interactions with other cultures have certainly broadened my personal horizons.

    What are you most proud of?

    Having my first solo show last October was a great accomplishment for me. It provided me with the framework to create my most challenging piece yet, an inhabitable 5-ft tall structure titled Asylum. I remember drawing up a rough sketch of the piece and feeling a bit unsure of myself once I had made the long list of supplies needed, such as a thousand small broken pieces of mirror glass and 10 gallons of sand. I have limited experience in woodworking and building, so creating a piece that was structurally sound to hold 80 pounds of glass was truly a proud moment.

    Tell us about a challenge you've run into.

    An ongoing challenge for me is becoming familiar with new media and finding ways to incorporate it into my work. New technology means more tools and more options, and sometimes new ways to engage the senses. I’d like to have all the tools I possibly can, but most times I find myself resorting to traditional media instead of using the computer.

    Follow Andrea on Instagram
    See Andrea on Etsy

    Amber Lu:




    Tell us a little bit about your background.

    My name is Amber Lu and I currently live in Los Angeles, CA. A lot of my artwork is based from imaginations that were imagined from childhood, frolicking in the gardens, and everyday adventures. I lived in San Francisco for a few years, and went to Academy of Art for photography. Later in the year, I started doodling and had the most loveliest time ever drawing the creatures I imagined, and from there on, I haven't put a pen down. I hope to be able to share my imaginations with others and hope that they feel the warmth and love from these creatures as much as I do.    

    What is your creative process like?

    Most people say my artwork is full of quirky imaginations, and/or "all over the place." There's rarely one subject in my drawings, and I like it that way. I want people to be able to imagine a lot of things at once, but in a way it all ties together. When I doodle, I just keep going and going. An hour flies by, and it turns into a finished piece without me realizing and I think that's the fun part of it.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    I find inspiration in a lot of things, but mostly from plants, and the people I have wonderful conversations with. My two biggest inspirations are Audrey Kawasaki and Annie Clark (St. Vincent).

    What are you most proud of?

    I grew up timid, and somewhat still am. I'm always shy, especially when people ask me, "tell me about yourself." I just never know what to say. Although I'm still timid, I feel that I've overcome it by a lot. Someone once gave me an opportunity to show what I am capable of, and I gave it my best, and to overcome being that shy girl, I feel that's a big accomplishment because I wouldn't be where I am today and I couldn't be happier. Although, I do think being timid is okay too, but it's also okay to show who you are, and what makes you you. (Corny, but it's the truth.)  

    How would you like to see your art out in the world?

    I would like to see my art in places that I know people will feel the warmth and love. It would be nice to have it be shown in my favorite city in the world, San Francisco.  

    Follow Amber on Tumblr

    Julie Kenniston:




    Tell us a little bit about your background.

    I've recently settled in Burlington, VT. My life here is pretty busy. I've spent the last few years trying to balance school and work and am finishing up my Associate's Degree in visual art at Community College of Vermont. Art became serious for me when I learned how to sew as a teenager. I loved being able to create clothing that completely suited my style. I was introduced to printmaking from an amazing professor through a class in Holyoke and immediately knew I wanted to use the techniques to create wearable art. Making patches has been my primary art focus since that class.

    What is your creative process like?

    My patches are made from drawings that I etch into zinc plates through a process called intaglio. Intaglio is time consuming and a lot can go wrong, but that's sort of why I'm drawn to it. Each mistake or hiccup that happens along the way is what pushes me to alter my designs and make them more interesting. After the design is carved into the zinc plate using nitric acid, I smear on ink and send it through the etching press. Since my patches are printed individually, each print comes out a little different. It's part of what makes printmaking so interesting for me.

    Where do you find inspiration?

    A lot of my inspiration actually comes from old picture books. My job is at a donation center for used goods, so I have access to countless cast aside books. Recently, my favorite finds have been field guides and anything with plant anatomy. If I'm feeling uninspired I just flip through a few books until something strikes a note. It's a great way to find a starting point.

    What are you most proud of?

    Right now my biggest pride is also my greatest struggle... balancing my hectic schedule between work, school, and studio time. It's been difficult to stay on top of things but somehow I've been making it work. I've had to cut out a large part of my social life but no success is without sacrifice. The fact that I'm paying my bills, getting good grades, and still finding time for art is a testament to my hard work.

    How would you like to see your art out in the world?

    My favorite part about selling patches is knowing that they'll be worn and enjoyed by someone else. Seeing my stuff locally gives me a warm, fuzzy feeling. The few times I've sold internationally have made me so excited and proud, just the thought that someone in another country is repping my art blows my mind. I want my art to go everywhere, near and far.

    Follow Julie on Instagram
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    Watch #DREAMERSANDDOERS on Instagram to see even more work from talented artists!

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