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About A Dog: Marnie

Happy National Dog Day! In honor of this special occasion, we were lucky to be graced by the presence of Marnie The Dog here at UO home office. A 12-year-old Shih Tzu rescue, Marnie is just as delightful in real life as she is in pics and made all of us want to rush to a shelter to adopt our very own pooches.

Shirley, Marnie's owner, has spoken up about her adoption story before. Back in June, she wrote, "I adopted Marnie from a not so great shelter a year and a half ago. She had been there for four months, after a two week stay at a municipal pound in Connecticut. She was found on the streets, smelly and matted. The pound had named her Stinky. She was around 10 years old. When I went to meet her after seeing her photo on Petfinder, I was hesitant to take her because she looked terrible, as if she might not last much longer. I was told she was blind in one eye, too.


Photo via Marnie The Dog

But I adopted her anyway, and this stranger in my home whom I knew virtually nothing about turned out to be the sweetest angel I could ever dream of. She had Giardia and a mouth full of decaying teeth, and I could tell she was much happier and healthier once she got her much needed dental surgery. The cloudiness in her left eye has dissipated and she is definitely not blind in either eye as of now. I know every day with Marnie is a gift for the both of us so I try to make the most of it."

After all of that, Marnie is now a big-time Instagram celeb who loves her owner with all her heart, which is enough motivation for us to get out there and adopt an older dog (or two or three). Sure, Marnie is one-in-a-million, but we're looking forward to finding our very own doggie BFFs. As Shirley says: adopt, don't shop!



Check out Marnie The Dog and Susie's Senior Dogs on Facebook for more info about adopting senior pups!

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UO x Lonely Planet: Instagram Contest Winner


Our UO x Lonely Planet Instagram contest ended a couple of days ago, and the winner of the big trip for two through Mexico, Belize and Guatemala was @aabbydowd! Her incredible winning picture, posted above, filled us with awe and terror (a lot of terror, if we're being honest), so we reached out to her to find out a little bit more about the story behind the photo. Read her story below, and thanks to everyone for their incredible submissions!

"My winning photo was taken last June just outside of Interlaken, Switzerland at Stockhorn - it's a 134 m (or 439.633 ft.) jump out of a cable car over a lake framed by the Alps. Switzerland is a lot like New Zealand in that there is a never-ending list of extreme sports for people to choose from if they are searching for one hell of an adrenaline overload: skydiving, bungee jumping, canyoning, paragliding, skiing, white water rafting, etc., etc., etc. The list goes on and on.

Now, I like to think that I'm a girl who feeds off adrenaline, but the idea of jumping out of a little box with nothing but a rope to keep me from plummeting almost 500 feet to my death was a pill I was having a bit of a hard time swallowing.

When we were on our way to Stockhorn that fateful afternoon, I was nervously rambling to one of the guys who would be assisting with my plunge out of the cable car, when I said, 'I'm really nervous. It might take me 20 minutes to work up the guts to actually jump.' His response? 'We do a five second countdown and if you don't jump, we push you out.'

Oh, okay. Cool.

Ultimately, the definitive quote to encompass this picture came from the woman who was helping all of us into our harnesses. She said, 'Just pick a point, look straight ahead, and jump. This is a mental game. Don't let your mind win.' The entire thing—from jumping out of the cable car, bouncing twice, and being reeled into a small rowboat—only lasted about eight seconds. When you look at the sequence of photos from that day, the rope just keeps going and going until I look like a tiny speck at the end of a piece of dental floss. If that's not some perspective, I'd love to know what is. I’m 23 years old, and out of all 23 years, those eight seconds were absolutely the most profound.

Needless to say, the day ended with more than one celebratory beer." Abby


More of our favorites from the contest:


Switzerland submitted by @joseewong


Photo of Hanauma Bay submitted by @robertjhill


Photo from Monastere Monserrat submitted by @kaidahranee


Photo of Copenhagen submitted by @leahmid


Photo submitted by @louiekovatch


Photo submitted by @reicolee


Photo submitted by @theaccidentaltourguide


Photo from Coki Beach submitted by @cierrageyer


Photo from Indonesia submitted by @nadyapink


Photo from Germany submitted by @kayliemarissa


Photo submitted by @kaitlinslone


Photo submitted by @haypeetason


Photo submitted by @mela_ann

Space Ninety 8: Welcome to the Gorbals


Ilan Hall, winner of Top Chef season 2, star of Knife Fight, and owner of the wildly popular downtown LA restaurant The Gorbals is a long-time friend of Urban Outfitters. Who better, then, to open up a restaurant (and open-air rooftop bar) at our new Brooklyn concept store Space Ninety 8? In Hall’s hands, food is fun, fresh, often irreverent (bacon wrapped matzo balls, anyone?), and always yummy. We caught up with the Long Island native, who has returned home to the East Coast to open The Gorbals’ new Williamsburg outpost, to talk trending ingredients, supermarket sushi, and what we can expect to see on his new menu.





Hi Ilan! Tell us about the concept for The Gorbals at Space Ninety 8.
I like to make food that’s a little bit cheeky, that doesn’t take itself too seriously, but at the end of the day is delicious. We started out the concept for our restaurant in LA with it being based in traditional Jewish food, with elements of pork sprinkled in! I try to keep that attitude in my food. Not that every dish has to have, like, shrimp and hummus—I don’t want to do it for the sake of doing it—but I like food to be fun. Some of it will be a little bit weird and maybe a bit challenging for people, but for the most part I want it to be tasty and really satisfying and for people to maybe eat things they haven’t eaten before. As a chef you want to open people’s eyes to new ingredients or things that are new to them.

So, you’re going beyond the Kale we see on many a Williamsburg menu?
I’m sick of kale for the sake of kale! I think there are so many great vegetables available, I don’t know why kale has had such a boom in popularity. It’s a good green… I just think that the idea of food trends is kind of ridiculous. We’re not going to have a kale salad on our menu, because everyone has a kale salad on their menu. I think that, being a chef, you need to utilize everything that you can. There are no rules. There’s so many types of greens you can use—different types of watercress, chickweed… I sort of want to stay away from bigger trends because it’s easy to get sucked into them. But maybe that’s a bad business decision! Who knows?





What can we expect to see on the menu?
I’m maybe about a third of the way through working on the menu. I’m trying to use things that are really seasonal and maybe a little bit more obscure. Not obscure but, like, less common fish. Most people don’t put bluefish on their menu—bluefish is one of my favorite fish. I’d rather use a skate cheek than a skate wing. I’d rather use a monkfish liver or a monkfish tail. There are so many great parts of an animal, and you don’t have to always use the basic filet. There’s this farm really close to where I grew up on Long Island in Glen Cove that, in the spring and summer, has amazing produce. We’re opening at the best possible time for New York [produce]. There’s peas, ramps, spring garlic, fava beans, soft shell crab, Bouchout mussels from Maine.

How did you approach the design of the space?
Within Space 98 I really wanted to keep the aesthetic of the restaurant soulfully connected to my restaurant in Los Angeles. It’s a bit more rough and rustic in LA, we have this giant 18ft communal table. Here, the focal point is our grill, once that’s fired up it will be the hearth, and heart, of the restaurant. I wanted to go a little bit more polished in terms of the furniture here. A friend made the tables, they’re a bit midcentury-ish. We got the legs from a metal-smith in southern California and and our plates are all organic and rough. I wanted to adapt to the space and have some plants and for it to be more put-together. When we opened up the restaurant in Los Angeles, we opened it with no money, all of our chairs we got at a secondhand place. I’m a father now—it’s time to grow up a little bit! At Space Ninety 8 we had the opportunity to do something that was really beautiful that wouldn’t take away from the old building. I think we did a pretty good job!





How did you come to open The Gorbals inside Space Ninety 8?
I’ve had a relationship with Urban Outfitters for a few years. I’ve done some charity events and some cooking things and hosted a lot of parties for them at my restaurant in LA. I was talking to someone about possibly doing some consulting work on a café here that Urban was thinking of opening and then I said, “That would be a great place for a restaurant!” And now, a year and a half later, we’re in the restaurant. It’s been a dream of mine to come back to New York and Williamsburg is the epicenter of new restaurants right now; it’s where people are doing exciting things, lots of late-night things. It’s similar to the push in New York around 2004 when all these new places were opening up in the East Village and Gramercy Park area—Momofuku and Casa Mono—and it all keeps moving East. We’ve been open in Los Angeles for almost five years, so it was time to come home.

Have you been shopping in the store yet?
I think my wife bought me some jeans! The space is beautiful, they really did a great job. It’s quite lovely. I love the renewal shop downstairs on the first floor, that’s my favorite. You just opened a bar on the roof deck, too.





What’s your poison?
I like to order very simple things at the bar. I like Irish whisky, I like single malt scotch. Lagavulin is my everyday scotch—I don’t like subtle scotch, I like something really smoky, really peaty. I drink gin; I’ll have a gin and tonic. If I’m ordering a cocktail I’ll usually have something that’s gin and a bit bitter.

How does the New York dining scene differ from LA?
New York people are very adamant about what they want, they have very high expectations of service and quality—you can’t really get anything by New Yorkers! New York is one of the most critical food scenes. Everyone works in their first six months towards that New York Times review. I’m not nervous, I just want to offer the best possible product that I can. I want it to be fun; I want people to have a good time when they’re here! Because when I’m cooking, even if it’s stressful or very busy, I still try and have fun, and I want my employees to have fun. That’s why we have an open kitchen—I want our cooks to be part of the party. I want everything to come together in an enjoyable way.





Where do you like to eat in New York?
I love going to Chinatown, I love going to Flushing. In Chinatown I love Great NY Noodletown—they have this balance of simplicity and super-powerful flavors. I have friends with some great restaurants. Casa Mono where I used to work is still probably, pound for pound, my favorite restaurant in New York. It’s tiny and the quality of food they put out is amazing. My friend Dale Talde opened two places in Park Slope—Talde is a really amazing restaurant. It just hits you in the heart, it’s really tasty and sort of Asian with no direct focus. My friend Damon Weiss is the chef at Lafaytte and he’s doing amazing French food on a very large scale. Edi and the Wolf in the East Village is amazing; [it has] Austrain roots—I like food from all over. Every time I have a meal, I’m inspired. I love places in the [Williamsburg] neighborhood: St. Anselm, Café Mogador. I love eating wherever I can, all the time.

What’s your food guilty pleasure?
Supermarket sushi! It’s gross! But there’s something about it. Like, a step below Wholefoods sushi, but not bodega sushi. I don’t know why. It’s gross in theory, and it’s gross in actuality too [laughs]. Because I’ve eaten sushi at the Tsukiji fish market in Tokyo at 6am and I’ve had some of the best and… that’s just not acceptable!

For the Record: Sharon Van Etten

Things people are saying about musician Sharon Van Etten’s new album, Are We There, include: 


1. “…a masterpiece, an album of extraordinary depth and sophistication that finds the New York singer and songwriter in full command of her considerable talent. (via Paste)
2. “…her most present-tense album to date, her most immediate and urgent—the peak of a steady upward trajectory. (via Pitchfork)
3. “A poignant tour-de-force, the message of Are We There is urgent, its delivery selfless” (via Pretty Much Amazing)

The record, Van Etten’s fourth, was released in late May, and like all of her work, it’s an earnestly vulnerable and deeply personal album filled with, as she explains, “songs that hurt like hell.” It is an often gut-wrenching trip through the complexities of a relationship. It is an appropriate use of the word “heavy,” but in a way that is satisfyingly sincere.  

Van Etten has spoken widely—widely!—about the album’s inception, from the break-up that inspired much of its architecture to feeding the songwriting cycle that her career has so-far dictated. 

Leading up to her UO “For the Record” vinyl signing on Thursday, July 3 at our Westover Road store in Portland, OR, we opted to lighten the mood by inviting Sharon to channel her own stomping grounds from the road—asking her to tell us all about her favorite things in NYC, from her ideal summer day in the city to her favorite haunts, from apartment horror stories to what its like to see Julie Andrews at the dentist.


This is Sharon Van Etten’s New York.

Years in the city? 
10 

Current neighborhood? 
Village

New York in the summer: what's on your itinerary for an ideal day?  
Bike Ride along the West Side, picnic, then read on a bench.

What was your first job in New York? 
Salesman at Astor Wines

Tell me a story about your worst New York apartment. 
I moved to Linden Street off the JZ line in 2005 and the neighbors told me they didn't want me in their neighborhood: Literally told me they didn't want me in their neighborhood after I had just moved in. They made sure I didn't feel comfortable on their block.

What's the most recent, truly great thing you saw in New York?
I saw The Great Beauty at Angelika. So moving.  So vivid.  And afterward, I went to Veloce wine bar and had amazing wine. Perfect evening.

Where in the city do you go to be alone?
I love going to Film Forum and IFC to movies by myself and wine bars, in general. Also, the Comedy Cellar when I am feeling low.

Tell me about a favorite New York memory.
I went to my dentist and as I was paying my bill, Julie Andrews walked in. I was immediately in tears. Childhood hero.

What's something very New York that you refuse to do?
Hang out in Times Square

What's something very New York that you shamelessly love?
The city skyline at the waterfront by the promenade driving in a cab at night.

Please share your best NYC survival tip.
Don't be an asshole, but be kind of on-guard while helping people. And work your ass off.

What makes someone a New Yorker?
 Living here and working here and helping people do the same.


Method of transportation?  
Subway

Bar where you're a regular? (and what's your poison?)  
Four Faced Liar, Bourbon and beer

Spot for leisurely brunch? 
Joseph Leonard

Spot for a celebratory dinner? 
Palma

Morning coffee shop and order? 
Americano at Joe's 

Favorite music store? 
Princeton Record Exchange (sorry! In Jersey!)

Music venue?  
Bowery Ballroom

Where do you get your news? 
Gothamist and New York Times

Place to see art?  
MoMA

Place to be outside? 
Washington Square Park or the West Side

Easy summer day trip?  
Long Beach Island

Place for a group hangout?  
My friend Taylor's house

Place to people-watch?  
Washington Square Park

Place to be inspired?  
Everywhere

SHOP SHARON'S VINYL PICKS

And if you're in Portland, be sure to stop by Sharon's UO "For the Record" vinyl signing Thursday, July 3 from 4-5pm at the Urban Outfitters on Westover Road, Portland, OR.

Summer in the City: Herald Square Coffee Chat

In anticipation of the opening of our newest store in New York City's Herald Square, we chatted over coffee–-and about coffee–-with some of the people bringing the store to life. One of the permanent fixtures in the new shop is Intelligentsia Coffee, sourcing, developing, roasting and delivering the best coffee in the world. Founded in Chicago in 1995, the company works diligently alongside their growers to produce coffees that are unlike any others and exclusive to Intelligentsia. After a successful NYC coffee bar launch in 2013, Intelligentsia will open its second NYC location in Herald Square on June 7, 2014. While we anxiously await Intelligentsia's new coffee bar at Herald Square, we visited its first NYC location at The High Line Hotel.









Read the full Summer in the City: Herald Square Coffee Chat feature

UO Creative Grant: Samuel Michael Casebolt


It may have taken Samuel Casebolt only one day to pitch his idea for our UO Creative Grant, but he's been working on the concept for years. Here we speak with the artist about his background in film, his love of the great unknown, and the plot for his winning concept, Hell's Belles, up today on his Kickstarter!

Introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about your background!
My name is Samuel Michael Casebolt and I live in Oakland, CA, working in downtown San Francisco as a display artist for Urban Outfitters. I have worked as a production designer for a couple of feature films by Ben Wolfinsohn, one of which, called High School Record, made it into the Sundance Film Festival in 2005. I've also produced and directed four other features, a music video for The Mae Shi, and the short Goodbye Sun, which I released in 2012.

Where did you go to school?
I went to the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) in Valencia, CA. and got a Bachelors Degree in Fine Art. I worked in many mediums including painting, drawing, and sculpture, and was showing in galleries around L.A. almost once a month for a while. 




How did you get involved in filmmaking?
Although I was making so much art, I honestly felt a bit limited. Films just seemed more visceral and really had the power to move me. While it is true that art and film are meant to convey different types of things to a viewer, I never felt that way standing in a gallery and I really wanted to. I began making skateboard videos and abstract art videos with semi-plots on a camcorder and editing on betacam cassettes. Over time, my films began having more and more story driven premises, although I still feel like film is another extension of the art I've always done. In fact, I always make paintings to prepare for and capture the tone of my films.

So, tell us about the UO Creative Grant contest!
I have been working on the concept for the film Hell's Belles for five or six years and was finishing another film, Goodbye Sun, which is kind of a sequel to Hell's Belles. When UO announced that they were giving a grant to someone who needed funding for a project, I was all over it. I had the concept fairly fleshed out and the thought occurred to me to make a trailer for a crowd-sourcing campaign to raise money for the feature film. I'm not sure if it was intentional, but Urban Outfitters announced the contest on a Tuesday and required submissions by THAT Friday! My first thought was, "Forget it. That's not enough time." But I realized, "This is what everyone else will think, too, which might give me a better chance!"

With this in mind, I made a video proposal in one night, sent it in, and ended up winning! I received $1500 and three weeks paid time off, which paid for most of the wardrobe, props, travel, and food for actors. Everyone else donated their time and efforts for the project, which was amazing! I spent the three weeks off editing, organizing and shooting scenes for the trailer.  


What is Hell's Belles about?
Set in the 1970s, Hell's Belles is a mockumentary about the 4444 Cult, which consisted of four women that had left society to live in the desert and then disappeared. The women had attempted to control reality with their minds in a series of exercises or "spells" to manifest objects and life forms, travel through space and time, and possibly transcend the physical realm altogether. Evidence of their abilities, which they believed all humans are capable of, was found in the form of photographs, film reels and other various objects, locked in a trunk on the bottom of the ocean. In Hell's Belles, scientists and other experts analyze the footage and eyewitness accounts of terrifying encounters in the desert, leading the filmmaker to take an expedition to the desert to find the church.


What inspired you?
I was inspired by regular trips to Joshua Tree National Park with friends. It's easy to come up with crazy stories when you are surrounded by interesting people in that environment. It would be harder to come up with a boring idea there. I am totally fascinated with physics and science and how it could be used to explain the mysteries of existence, which is partially what this film is attempting to do. I have also been inspired by UFO and Bigfoot documentaries as a kid, most specifically in this case by a film called Overlords of the UFO ( I love their dead serious delivery of "facts" about UFOs that are just silly at times, but still intriguing to watch).



What are your…

Top five films of all time?
This is a really difficult question to answer because there are so many films that I put in the flawless category, which don't get sorted from best to worst. They are untouchable, but I think lovability is as important as the avant garde. There is something to be said for a film that can make you love a character, whether it's a Disney film or a Criterion Collection film.  The Shining, Rushmore, Pulp Fiction, American Graffiti, and Boogie Nights stand out to me as films that have a lot of both.

Top five actors?
Sorry I can't choose five: Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Jack Nicholson, Daniel Day-Lewis, Meryl Streep, Chris Cooper, Samuel L. Jackson.

What do you want to do in your future? Do you plan on continuing with film? 
I have several films at various stages of production and will continue to find ways to make them happen one way or another because I just feel the need to. I have a haunted house story, a horror film, and a short about the origin of mermaids. I love the challenge of making my thoughts become reality. It's something I am really passionate about. 



When does Hell's Belles come out? Give us all the details!
I don't have a release date for Hell's Belles the feature. I will have to make a plan for shooting once I know what the budget will be. Possibly as far off as 2016.

What's the number one reason we should watch your film?
It will be pretty funny.


Make sure to check out Samuel's Kickstarter page to help make this film happen!

UO DIY: Plant Hanger


During our outdoor potted plant DIY at our Malibu store, we had one of our talented associates give us her (easy) step-by-step guide on how to make our very own plant hangers. Read on for full instructions, then go make your own! (And we promise, even if you don't have a single Martha Stewart bone in your body, you'll be able to make this.)

DIY Plant Hanger Instructions

Needed:
Spool of cord
(something durable, can be found in jewelry aisle of craft stores)
Key ring
Small potted plant



1) Cut 4 lengths of cord, about 10 inches longer than you want the planter to be when finished.



2) Fold the 4 cords in half at their midpoint. Slide the key ring up to the midpoint and tie a knot to keep it in place.



3) Separate the 8 cords into groups of two. About 8 inches down from the key ring, you are going to tie a basic square knot with the first two cords.



4) To tie the square knot, loop the two cords over each other, as if you're about to tie your shoelaces. Then loop the cords around each other a second time, leading with the opposite cord you started with.

5) Follow this step for the remaining groups of 2 cords. You should be left with 4 knotted strands. 



6) Grab a friend to hold your plant hanger up, or hook the key ring to something. Take the right cord from the first set, and the left cord from the second set about 10 inches down from the knots you've already tied. Tie another square knot.

7) Repeat this with the right cord from the 2nd set, and the left cord from the 3rd set. Continue with the remaining cords.



8) Gather all the cords together and tie in a big knot.



9) Fit your potted plant inside the hanger and enjoy!

Read full Get Outside feature

Space Ninety 8 Market Space: Local Made


As part of Space Ninety 8 Market Space, the Local Made pop-up showcases 44 artists and designers from the Brooklyn area. Independently minded, handcrafted, and one of a kind pieces are available from the very hands that made them, with unrivaled attention to detail and craftsmanship. Below, we spotlight some of Brooklyn's independent brands and makers you'll find at Local Made. Visit Williamsburg's Space Ninety 8 to see all 44 artists under one roof or click here to read our artist feature in full.



MCMC Fragrances
Created by Anne McClain, a graduate of the Grasse Institute of Perfumery in southern France, MCMC Fragrances is a boutique fragrance brand and studio based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.



Species by the Thousands
Founded in 2005 by Erica Bradbury, Species by the Thousands is a Brooklyn-based jewelry and lifestyle line influenced by outsider worlds.


(Photo credit: Jody Rogac)

New Friends
Established in 2012 by Alexandra Segreti and Kelly Rakowski in NYC, New Friends design and produce weavings, textiles and housewares.



Mighty Real Skin
Created out of a love for aromatherapy and skincare that's 100% natural, partners Salvador and Enrique make each of their essential oil blends in NYC in small batches.



Emily Miranda
Making her first piece in metal in 2010, Brooklyn-based Emily Miranda continues to make jewelry inspired by nature and fantastical creatures.



Datter
Created by illustrator Kaye Blegvad in 2010, Datter Industries creates subtle, narrative jewelery in an endeavor to turn drawings into wearable art.


(Photo credit: Julia Newman)

Brooklyn Herborium
Founded in South Brooklyn in 2013 by moms Molly and Emma, Brooklyn Herborium is a complete line of healthy skin care and home care products.

UO At Home: Our Open Road


In October 2012, Adam, Emily and Colette Harteau—a family of three, soon to be four—set out on a journey from California through the Americas in their VW Westfalia Camper. What started as a one-year adventure has turned into a freewheeling life, without an end point in sight. Adam takes pictures and makes art; Emily cooks nutritious meals for the family using local produce and is developing a cookbook of her road-tested recipes. Colette takes it all in with the pure wonderment of a child exposed to the great wide world. This month, the Harteau's team-up with Urban Outfitters on a curated assortment of home goods. To celebrate the collaboration, we asked the traveling family to fill in our questionnaire about their life on the open road. Read the full feature here.

Shop Our Open Road x UO

Local Made: Cold Picnic

Cold Picnic is partners Phoebe Sung and Peter Buer, who craft bags, art, textiles and more in their Brooklyn studio. Carrying on the tradition of storytelling through symbols, Phoebe and Peter make each piece by hand, seeking out objects from the past.

As part of Williamsburg's Space Ninety 8 Market Space, Cold Picnic has created custom wall hangings, macramé plant hangers and leather goods for our Local Made pop-up. Get the scoop on Phoebe and Peter's cool, nostalgic vibe and colorful creative process. Read the full feature here.

UO DIY: Converse Customization


Down in Austin, we had two of our favorite local artists, Sophie Roach and Josh Row, customizing shoes for two days at our downtown store. While shoppin' around one morning, we had Sophie customize some Chucks just for us, and we love how they turned out. (They might even inspire some ideas for your very own DIY kicks.) Now that we realize how easy it is to do ourselves, we're about to buy some sneaks in bulk and get to CRAFTIN'. To customize your own Chucks, all you'll need is acrylic paint, fabric paint or paint pens. That's it! (The acrylic and fabric paint will hold up better than other paints on the shoe, and the paint pens are good for details.) Anything else you'd like to add is up to you. We stuck some pins on ours because we're unable to resist the call of anything Breakfast Club related, but adding studs, colored laces and glitter is an option as well. Check out our kicks below. Katie


Employee creations


Sophie hard at work




Our custom shoes by Sophie (and our totally fake Polaroids)


So many choices


We loved Josh's cat shirt, as well as his "DANG" shoes


Better Together: Katie and John

Meet John and Katie, who defy the old adage that couples shouldn't work together. John is a men's stylist at Urban Outfitters, while his other half is a freelance photographer from New York, who shoots people and fashion with a beautifully authentic eye. Here they share their story as creative and romantic partners. Read the full feature here.

Better Together: Sarah and Colin

Sarah, an artist and print designer, and her Urban Outfitters photographer husband, Colin, spend most of their days working with a myriad of artistic mediums. Whether Sarah is painting and drawing at her textile design studio ANONA, or Colin is photographing a UO lookbook, making beautiful imagery is their abiding passion. We caught up with the Philadelphia-based duo at Sarah's beautifully curated studio, where textile prints for companies including Urban Outfitters are created. Read the full feature here.

Editorial: Great Escape

Sometimes you just need to get away from it all: Find a hideaway to hang with friends, get out on the road, cruise the ocean, explore new streets and hit the beach. We grabbed our crew, headed to the west coast, and didn’t stop adventuring from beach house to boat, through neon nights, up until dawn. Read the full feature here.

Get Gifted: Hazel's Wish List

Get Gifted: Hazel's Wish List!

When I set out to make this wish list, I started thinking about the best part of the holidays: winter. My favorite part of winter is that sometimes it snows and I like to stare at it wistfully from my bedroom window while wearing a sweater over a sweater with a sweater draped over my shoulders. Here are some items I'd like to surround myself with while gazing wistfully. —Hazel

1. Glasser Interiors

This was one of my favorite albums of the year. I can't imagine how good Glasser's futuristic, synth-driven, minimalist sophomore album must sound on vinyl. (Just kidding, I can guess: it'll sound beautiful.)

2. Fujifilm Instax Mini 8
An Instagram is just an Instagram...but Polaroids are forever. Gimme this mini Fujifilm Instax Mini to document my cute life, please.

3. The Riot Grrrl Collection

As someone who's done research in the actual Fales Riot Grrrl Zine Collection, I am dying to get my hands on this book which includes zines from the archives of Kathleen Hanna, Sheila Heti, Johanna Fateman and more.

4. Mermaid's Kiss Perfume
I don't know exactly what a mermaid's kiss smells like, but I want to smell like one. Thank god this perfume has some smooches bottled up for me. Wait--how'd they do that?

5. Lime Crime Cosmic Glitter in Taurus
I am all about Glitter with a capital G. On your eyes, in your hair, on your bod, wherever. Give it an astrological twist and I'll definitely want it. I want my Lime Crime Cosmic Glitter in my star sign (Taurus) but all the signs come in pretty glam shades.

6. Baggu Classic Small Leather Shopper
Lugging books to class is a pain but give me a Baggu tote with a Midas touch and I'll stop complaining about it.

7. Emoji Sticker Sheet
I am a firm believer in Emoji usage. Less talk, more pixelated 21st century hieroglyphics, please. These stickers are perfect!

Happenings: Everybody Street x UO

Looking to get into some Art Basel screenings this weekend? Stop by our Miami Beach location TODAY at noon for a chance to score tickets to a private screening, sponsored by us, of Everybody Street, a documentary that pays tribute to the spirit of street photography in NYC.

For more info on giveaways, make sure to follow UO Miami on Instagram!

Behind-the-Scenes: Cory Robinson

Urban Outfitters' Display Artist Mentor Cory Robinson found some time between setting-up our Miami store and making his own art to talk about what's on his holiday wish list, and what he'll gift you if you're lucky enough. 
Interview by Ally Mullen

Introduce yourself!

I am originally from Connecticut, but moved to Philly in 2003. This is where I was lucky enough to get involved with the Urban Outfitters display world and I haven't looked back. I now reside in sunny and relaxing Tampa, Florida. When I'm not working, I sell art work.  In the last few months, my wife and I have also been selling art and vintage clothes at local markets. 

What are the best and most challenging aspects of working on store display?
The best part is traveling to places that I may not usually choose to go, working with all the homies that I don't get to see all the time, creating new stuff, seeing new stuff, and skating new stuff. The hardest thing would be the work and short timeline to accomplish so much. People sometimes think that we are just on some type of vacation sippin' fancy drinks, but we're far from it. We go in early and work late. You have to be focused and ready for a lot to come your way. It's not easy to set a entire store to be visually stimulating in a week's time. It's also hard to remember that you are not on vacation with your friends, so you have to keep your after-work activities pretty mellow. 


Tell us about the Miami tote bags that you designed...
I submitted around 16 drawings—some maybe not so appropriate (cats doing beer bongs)—but awesome nonetheless. The team picked the one they liked sent it to the art department who added color. It was a collaboration really, and I am super stoked to be a part of it!

Let's talk holiday! What do the windows look like right now at your Urban Outfitters store in Tampa?
My holiday windows came out really pretty and cool. There are a lot of mirrors, gold and silver foiling, and lights. I actually got "proud of's" from the company. 

What's on your UO holiday wishlist?
1. Urban Renewal Vintage Jansport backpack
2. Converse Chuck Taylor High-Tops in cream or maybe Low-Top white
3. American Fleece Lounge Pants
4. Dickies Skinny Straight Work Pant
5. Grateful Dead Flowers Tee

When you're getting a gift for someone else, do you tend to buy something or create it yourself?
I try to be creative and make people gifts. Sometimes the time slips away from me and I go into panic mode and just buy something. But mostly I try to create something special. Recently, I've been making these cats cut out of old skateboards, which are fun gifts. If you have a kid, I might gift you one of the onesies or puzzles that I make. If you get really lucky, you might score one of the T-shirts that I designed for Skatepark of Tampa with 'Lil Ripper' on them. Beyond that, you might get a Chili's gift card or a funny watercolor I've made.


Be honest: What's the worst gift you've ever gotten?
I don't remember how I got it or who gave it to me, but I got a $50 gift card to a grocery store. At first, I was hyped, like, "free groceries!" But once I hit the Googler and saw that it was a hour away from my house in Philly, I was super bummed. I'll never drive there and if I did, my chicken nuggets would be defrosted by the time I got home. I still have it, by the way, if any wants a Genuardis gift card. I've kept it like some sort of gift card hoarder.

Where can we find you online?
My website mrcoryrobinson.com. If you wanna see art, pics of my cat or my homie standing in front of weird cars (#gleepglopbycars), then follow my instagram @mrcoryrobinson

Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving! Hope everyone has lots of loved ones they want to snuggle up to today, and if not, we wish everyone luck on hiding in the spare room with a bottle of wine until the day is over. Either way, we love y'all.

And if anyone is braving the sales tomorrow, be careful! No flat screen T.V. is worth losing a limb over, yo.