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I'm With the Band: Twin Peaks


From left: Cadien, Jack, Clay, and Connor of Twin Peaks.

Last weekend at FYF Festival I met up with another of my favorite bands, Twin Peaks, from Chicago, IL. Nobody in the band is over the age of 20, and already, they've released two albums, most recently being Wild Onion, which have both been received with very high praise. Cadien, Clay, Jack, and Connor have been on tour with The Orwells, Arctic Monkeys and Criminal Hygiene, and have been making their way up the ranks all summer. Read on to see what music the guys have been influenced by along the way and how they're feeling about it all. These guys are here to stay.
Interview and photography by Maddie Sensibile

You just released your new record, Wild Onion, a few weeks ago. How are you feeling about it?


Clay: We feel good about it, we feel great about it.

Cadien:
We made a mix tape with a lot of our favorite kinda songs.

Name a few bands for me that have influenced you when it comes to making music.

Clay:
I probably wanted to start making music from The Velvet Underground. Big influence for me.

Jack:
I like Black Lips. That was really one of the first concerts I went to that like, made me really want to play rock and roll seriously. I like R. Kelly a lot, and The Beatles.

Cadien:
Those are all great. I’m gonna throw out Jay Reatard too - he was pivotal for me.

Connor:
Watching Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin videos, ‘cause like, playing live what made me want to play music more than anything.

What were the first records you bought?

Clay:
The first time I bought music was when I bought Dark Side of the Moon. It started playing and I thought it wasn’t working or something. It was the first CD I ever had, so I turned it all the way up. It just starts with that woman screaming, and it keeps getting louder and louder, it really freaked me out. I didn’t listen to it again for another three years probably.

Cadien: I copped Beatles’ 1 when I was a little dude, from my mom, and I blasted that for a long time.

Connor:
A Blink 182 CD, and I don’t remember which one it was, but I remember buying it and being super stoked about it.

Jack:
To be honest, I was a big Britney Spears fan, and had mad love for N*SYNC as well, it was probably one of them. It’s pop perfection, who can blame me.



Clay, tell me about those dance moves you do with your guitar on stage.

Clay:
For most of us, I think we would just feel uncomfortable standing there. I don’t know, it just seems natural to me. I know it looks pretty weird.

I did see you guys perform last year in LA for the first time. How do you feel about playing larger festivals and moving up the bill at such a young age?

Clay:
We’re so about it.

Jack:
We’re starting to play more festivals like these, and the more it happens, kinda the more surreal it seems that we’re here now.

Clay:
In places like this, the artist area, you get to meet people, even just for a little bit, and everyone’s pretty nice most of the time so it’s cool.

Who are you listening to right now?

Clay:
I’m listening to a lot of Kinks. I just got Kinda Kinks, and it’s a really good record.

Jack:
I’ve been recently really getting into Blood Orange’s most recent album, and I got to meet him for a little bit, and he’s fucking cool.

Cadien:
Naomi Punk’s new album is super great, like their first album, and more people should check them out.

Connor:
We played with this band on our first tour called Teenage Moods, and a week ago I just kinda stumbled back on their stuff, and Mood Ring is so cool.

Twin Peaks music

I'm With the Band: Joyce Manor


FYF Festival may have been hectic this past weekend, but I managed to meet up with Los Angeles natives Joyce Manor for a quick interview before their set at the Main Stage on Saturday at the fest. They say their new record, Never Hungover Again, took them a few tries to get right, but once things got on track, it was all golden from there. Never Hungover Again is a more dramatic turn for the band but one that's in a totally right direction. Read what the band (Barry Johnson, Chase Knobbe, Matt Ebert, and Kurt Walcher) had to say just before I took their portrait in front of John F. Kennedy. Maddie

How are you guys? Are you happy about how the record has been received so far?

Barry:
We're very excited to be at FYF, extremely excited about how our record's been received. I felt like it was pretty different and no one's really acted that way. Like there was no "What happened to this band? They used to have something and they lost it."

A departure from your sound.


Barry:
I felt like it was more so than people have been acting. People have been like, you know, it's cool, they did what they did but made it different. People seem happy with it.

So tell me a bit about how you guys got things started for Never Hungover Again and the recording process for the record.


Barry: There was an entire first chunk of songs that we wrote and scrapped because they weren't up to scratch.
Chase: We recorded them, too.
Barry: We recorded them, and we were writing songs, and I think we were kinda stuck. We started writing songs that sounded like songs we had already written. I think we got a little set in our ways, a little comfortable, and then Chase came to practice and was like “Hey, I have this riff,” and I was like I kind of have a song, so we went “Do you want to try playing at the same time?” And then we did and it was like, that’s how the new record needs to sound. As soon as that happened, all six or seven songs we had were just scrapped.

How do you feel about playing FYF this year with such incredible bands on the lineup?

Chase:
We’ve played the past three years, but today’s the first time we’ve played the main stage. We’re officially small fish in the big pond. We’re in the big pond now, so now we just have to eat a bunch of other fish.

Do you have an ultimate goal as a band?

Barry:
We’ve already surpassed it. Our goal was to press vinyl and have a piece of vinyl that we made, and tour Japan, and we did them both. So, this is all fully bonus right now. As bonus as it wants to get is great, but we’ve already done everything we’ve set out to do.

Tell me three bands you’d like to have headline your dream festival.

Kurt:
Guided By Voices.
Barry: Who else would we get on that?
Chase: Toys That Kill.
Barry: Guided By Voices, Toys That Kill headlining…
Chase: Weird Al.

What have you been listening to lately?

Barry:
My friend Tony Molina sent me demos for his new record and I can’t stop listening to them.
All: Spirit of the Beehive, from Philly.

Happenings: FYF Festival 2014 Recap


This year, FYF Festival moved to a new location, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and spared no expense when it came to the vibes, food, and, of course, the artists playing. Last year, FYF expanded to a two day festival, making it an even bigger deal to us LA-natives. What’s better than a festival just twenty minutes from your house? Nothing, in our opinion. Sean Carlson, founder of FYF, stacked the lineup this year with favorites like Ty Segall and Mac Demarco, and even gave the fans huge comebacks from The Strokes, Interpol, and Slowdive. LA ladies Haim also played one of our favorite sets of the weekend, along with excellent solo sets from members of The Strokes, and a perfect daytime set from Real Estate.

We caught most of Interpol’s smashing set and they were totally shredding the whole time under beautiful red lights. We were most excited to see Grimes perform over the weekend, since it'd been a couple years since we caught her last. She closed out Friday night at The Lawn stage, with her incredible beats and dancers in tow. On Sunday, we spent the entire day at the Main Stage, anxiously awaiting The Strokes, but while waiting for the band that's influenced so many of us, we also got to see Kindness, Tanlines, Blood Orange, and Haim perform. Could there have been a better set of bands to “open” for The Strokes? Nope! All in all, FYF really honed in on the meaning of the music this weekend with an extraordinary lineup of bands and good people. Check out some of our favorite pics from this weekend below! Photos by Maddie Sensibile


Matt Mondanile of Real Estate calming the crowd with beachy vibes on Saturday afternoon.


Albert Hammond Jr. graced the Main Stage on Saturday afternoon to TONS of excited Strokes fans, and even covered "Last Caress" by The Misfits. It was so good.


We've never seen someone dance like Gerrit Welmers of Future Islands. Absolutely insane. Now we've got the itch to see them again, ASAP!


Paul Banks of Interpol on Saturday night.


Queen Grimes! Claire Boucher played a ton of old favorites like "Genesis" for the crowd, and even brought out Blood Diamonds for a performance of "Go."




Above we have Devonté Hynes of Blood Orange performing at sunset on Sunday at the Main Stage. We never tire of Blood Orange. Check out Cupid Deluxe if you haven't already.






Need we say more about how hard the girls of Haim rocked? Their cover of Fleetwood Mac's "Oh Well" is always amazing. They know what they're doing, and they do it well.




THE STROKES, YOU GUYS, THE STROKES! We got to hear "Barely Legal" and "New York City Cops" live, so we're content.


Okay, ending this recap with Maddie's selfie with Mac Demarco.

Happenings: Afterfest LA Recap

This past Friday night in Los Angeles, Making Time brought Afterfest to Los Angeles with Kindness and Ramona Lisa headlining. Dave P of Making Time quickly transformed Los Globos in Silverlake into a club straight out of 1977, disco ball and all. Before we knew it, Ramona Lisa had taken the stage all in white, performing one of the most ethereal performances we’ve ever seen. Caroline Polachek and her singers who doubled as backup dancers performed a carefully choreographed set, with matching outfits and eyeball print nail art.

Kindness, aka Adam Bainbridge, took the stage next to close out the night, and wooed the crowd with his smooth disco-infused music - he even brought his close friend and collaborator Devonté Hynes of Blood Orange out for a few songs, and eventually brought Dev back on stage with the entire Blood Orange crew for a performance of “On the Line.” Kindness is definitely an artist to watch, especially with his swift dance moves that rival that of Mick Jagger and James Brown. Scroll below to see all of our photos from the event!

Photos by Maddie Sensibile

























Studio Visit: Alia Penner


Alia Penner is a modern-day pop artist based in Los Angeles. Penner lives in a quiet, colorful home atop a hill in the Mount Washington area of Los Angeles that overlooks Downtown. Inside her home you'll also find her studio, where she works her magic. Penner's home is a place of absolute wonder; the rooms are filled with her own work, found objects, and of course, her furry grey cat, Edie. Aside from traditional mediums, Alia also works with fashion and film. Currently she works largely with Cinespia, and recently worked with Anna Sui. I had a quick chat with Alia to learn a bit more about her work, and how much she loves balloons and Miss Piggy.
Interview by Maddie Sensibile

Alia Penner wearing Romance Was Born's 'Dream On' collection.



Hi Alia! Tell me a little bit about yourself and how you came to be an artist.
I grew up in Topanga Canyon, which is a really special place to grow up in. I’m actually third generation; my grandfather lived there and then my dad grew up there too, right next door to where I grew up. Now I live in Mount Washington which is kind of like Topanga-ish, close to Downtown L.A. I always wanted to be an artist. Ever since I can remember, I wanted to be a cartoonist, I wanted to be a fashion designer, and I wanted to be anything that had to do with art. I just drew all the time, since before I can remember. I went to art school at Otis, and I’ve just been a freelance artist since I graduated.

Your work is definitely reminiscent of the 1960s and '70s. What about that time period stands out to you?
I guess just the color and freedom. I feel like the '60s and '70s were also pretty inspired by other time periods as well. So it’s kind of like when people say that my art is inspired by '60s and '70s, I feel like there’s so many different places that I’m taking inspiration from, like art nouveau, or deco. There’s just so many points are jumping off points. I love psychedelic artwork.



Other than those decades, what primarily inspires your work?
I’m a big collector of books. I think books are really important, and I think you should have as many as you can fit in your house. I love having things in my hands. I love searching for things, I love treasure hunting, I love going to flea markets and finding crazy things. I just found this insane wheel of fortune from this old carnival. I’m super into movies and I watch them all the time. My boyfriend started the movies at the Hollywood Forever cemetery, so I help program movies there, which is so inspiring. It's fun to curate and create a whole experience. I’m really excited about Gentlemen Prefer Blondes on June 21. But just being able to pick something like that…Gentlemen Prefer Blondes!  The photobooth is going to be amazing!


"DVF Pop Wrap Animation for the Warhol Foundation made by me"

You do a lot of collaborative work as well. What do you enjoy most about pairing fashion with art?
I love working in fashion. I think you should dress as silly and crazy as you want every day. I love dressing up and playing a role which goes back to movies, and being inspired by fashion and movies. Making clothes on my own was really exciting and hopefully I get to do more of that in the future, selling my dresses at Colette. I only made like ten of them or something. I really love working with Anna Sui, and I think we will be working together again soon. I did her backdrop for her fashion show a couple seasons ago, and she’s such a hero and so cool. I got to visit her in her studio and she had books everywhere stacked high as the ceiling.

What are your go to films that have impeccable fashion and art direction?
My favorite, favorite ones…I love Smile with Bruce Dern. That movie is one of my favorites. I love pageants and over the top fashions for that, the ‘70s rad teenage girls in that are really funny. I love musicals, all kinds of musicals. I could watch Esther Williams and all those amazing Ziegfeld Follies all day long. I just watched Witches of Eastwick again, and there’s this one scene in it that blew my mind. I’m obsessed with balloons and re-watching the scene where they’re holding thousands of pink balloons in the ballroom and then they dance through them... I mean, what beats that?


Alia Penner's Balloon Girl Performance starring Labanna Babalon.



Who would you call your style icon?
Miss Piggy, definitely, is a style icon for me. I love Miss Piggy, I love the Muppets. I have a book called Miss Piggy’s Guide to Life and there are some really important lessons.
Zandra Rhodes, another designer that I’ve met and interviewed before, she is just insanely cool. Pink hair. Like, I love how rad you can be when you’re old. You don’t have to be an insane plastic surgery lady. You can be a badass with pink hair and tons of black eyeliner and wear whatever you want. I almost can’t wait to be that.

What has been your favorite project to date?
I directed my first music video for Jena Malone this year, which was a really special experience to work with her. We covered her in flowers and glitter and nothing else. Another favorite project I did last year was painting Katy Perry’s piano. That’s probably the best. It's so special because it’s this object that you know is gonna be around forever. It's covered in red roses and ice cream colors. It was great to work on it over the course of a couple months. I feel like everything has to happen so fast nowadays, so to be able to even spend time painting something is just a pleasure. I wouldn’t mind doing that all the time.


"Katy Perry's piano in my studio"



Who is your dream artistic collaboration?
My dream artistic collaboration would be to create a DREAM Theme Park with Niki de Saint Phalle & Yayoi Kusama.

Alia Penner is represented by Weiss Artists. Check out Alia Penner's website and Instagram.

About a Band: Summer Twins


All week long we'll be learning a little bit more about each of the bands in our Burger Records lookbook and feature. Up today: Summer Twins.

Summer Twins are my ideal girl group. Their music is perfect for swaying in the wind with your gal pals during the summer (or any time of year, really). This Burger Records band is made up of two sisters, Chelsea and Justine Brown, who have been playing music together for at least ten years now. These Southern California natives love good old rock 'n roll, warm summer evenings, and are dying to go to Hawaii. I caught up with Chelsea Brown to learn a little bit more about the band.
Maddie
Photograph by Joy Newell

Hi Chelsea! Tell me a little bit about Summer Twins and how you started the band. Have you always wanted to be in a band together since you're sisters?
We started our first all-girl band when we were 13 and 14. We didn't know how to play our instruments yet, but we just liked the idea of being in a band! We learned by playing covers of bands like The Ramones and The Donnas, then started writing our own songs. Years later, around 2008, we started Summer Twins. Now that we've been playing together for over 10 years, we can't image not being in a band together!

Who or what inspires your music most?
Our music is inspired by lots of old rock 'n roll: everything from '50s doo-wop to '60s garage/girl group to '70s punk.

Do you have plans to release a follow-up to your self-titled album soon?
We released an EP last year titled Forget Me. We're now working on new songs and hoping to record another full-length later this year.

Your band's name is pretty much the epitome of summertime. What is your favorite part about being in California in the summer that you can't get anywhere else?
Well, it gets really hot, especially in Riverside since we're farther from the coast, but summer nights are always great. When the sun goes down it starts to cool down, yet it's warm enough for shorts; it's perfect weather for hanging out on the porch or skating around downtown.

What songs are on your summer playlist?
"Sit Down I Think I Love You" by Buffalo Springfield has always been part of our summer soundtrack for years. Right now we're also into "Hawaii" by Naive Thieves, "Holiday" by Albert Hammond Jr., "How Long Do I Have to Wait for You" by Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings (our favorite song to listen to on tour), and "Tropical Birds" by Miniature Tigers.

What's your ideal vacation location?
As typical as it sounds, Hawaii! We've never been there before!

About a Band: Vision


All week long we'll be learning a little bit more about each of the bands in our Burger Records lookbook and feature. Up today: VISION.

Christopher Valer, Benjamin Nastase, and Phillip Dominick make up Burger Records outfit Vision. The LA-based band have been influenced by everything from Brit Pop to Nirvana's classic Nevermind, yet they have a sound all their own. Vision are a band that are truly loyal to the craft, working and sweating until the best product is done. Get to know Christopher Valer and the guys of Vision below.
Maddie

Hi guys! Tell me a little bit about how you guys formed.
All:
Christopher has always been in and out of bands in the LA music scene and he was just tired of playing other peoples' songs and he wanted to create his sound and form his own band.
Christopher: I couldn't find anybody who fit the band so I looked to my brother Phillip and our childhood friend Ben to fill in the slots and that's how it's been since.

As a band, who do you feel your ultimate influences are that carry through all of your material?
Christopher:
We all grew up together listening to The Doors and a lot of Nirvana. We feel we take the dark and serious part of The Doors with the aggressiveness and heaviness of Nirvana. Those two are our main influences but we take a lot of inspirations from a lot of Brit Pop bands like The Stone Roses, Blur, and Oasis.

What's the best part about performing live?
Christopher:
The fact that we're able to block out the world and our problems and be only in that moment.



Best summer memory ever?
Christopher:
Being in the garage, sweating, practicing drenched in sweat while everyone we know is at a pool party or a beach.

Who is your end all, be all favorite band or album to listen to in the summer?
Christopher:
Nirvana Nevermind. ALWAYS.

What's next for the band?
Christopher:
We just spent two years working on our first full-length album Inertia due to be released by Burger Records in January 2015. Aside from our new album, we're planning an east coast tour and traveling more up north and just wherever they'll have us. We just want to keep playing and sharing our music as long as we can.

About a Band: The Aquadolls

All week long we'll be learning a little bit more about each of the bands in our Burger Records lookbook and feature. Up today: The Aquadolls.

Just last year, The Aquadolls released Stoked On You with Burger Records. Lead singer Melissa Brooks, Ryan Frailich, and Josh Crawford make up the band, providing us with excellent Beach-Boys-esque riffs and vocals worthy of some of the best girl groups from the '60s. Below, get to know a little bit more about one of our favorite bands you should be listening to this summer.
Maddie

Hi Melissa! Tell me a little bit about yourself and your band, The Aquadolls.
I started this band in the summer of 2012. We released our debut album "Stoked On You" in November of last year, and now I'm working on my solo album!

As a musician, who would you say your biggest role model is and why?
My ultimate musical crush is Gwen Stefani. Her voice is so pure and she's a great lyricist. I can't tell you how many times I've screamed along to No Doubt's song "Don't Speak" at the top of my lungs while sobbing as a kid. Gwen is a powerhouse.

You have excellent on-stage style. What is your favorite thing to wear while performing?
My lucky leather jacket and a mini skirt.

Since summertime is near, what are three of your summer essentials?
Jelly sandals, sunglasses, and my tattoo chokers.

What song or album would you say is the epitome of summer?
“Summertime” by GIRLS.

What do you guys like doing when you're not playing music?
Ride skateboards by the beach!

Read our Summer Party with Burger Records feature

About a Band: together PANGEA


All week long we'll be learning a little bit more about each of the bands in our Burger Records lookbook and feature. Up today: together PANGEA.

Together PANGEA just released their latest album Badillac this year.  Along with their friends at Burger Records, together PANGEA are currently on a mission to bring the era of garage rock back. William Keegan, Danny Bengston and Erik Jimenez are the guys behind the band.  I talked to bassist Danny about the band, how they started, why they love working with Burger Records and the bands they say we should be keeping our ears open for.
Maddie
Photograph by Alice Baxley

Hey Danny! So tell me a little bit about together PANGEA and how you guys came to be.
Well, me and William started playing music together probably like ten years ago, then we met our drummer Eric when I was going to Cal Arts, and yeah, it just took shape from there.

You just released your full-length, Badillac, which has a definite California feel. What about the state influenced the record?
Maybe nothing directly; I think just sort of living here in general and having this sort of artistic community and Burger Records and bands like that. Your friends influence you a lot, I think, sort of by default.

What do you like most about being able to work with a label like Burger Records?
They’ve always been really supportive of us and they hit us up pretty early within the first year of Burger starting. We didn’t have a label or anything, but we had friends who were with Burger and we were figuring out how to become part of the thing. They reached out to us and they’ve always been super supportive and they’re down to help us out any way they can, whether it was like in the early days getting us on bigger shows and things like that, whatever we needed. We signed with a major label and they were nothing but supportive, and we’ve made it work so we can continue to release things with them. We even have some new plans to release some cool new things in the future together.

What's your idea of an ideal show? I know your shows get pretty rowdy..
Yeah, I don’t know. Any all ages show, I’d say. Usually a lot of our fans tend to be younger, a lot of them tend to not be 21, or a lot of times not even be 18. I think that’s the biggest thing - an affordable all ages show, that’s the ideal thing for us. They definitely do get rowdy.

What's your favorite thing to do in LA during the summer?
Just swimming! Usually my favorite thing to do is go swimming in rivers, swimming holes and stuff. There are a couple that are within like an hour of here that me and my friends frequently hit up. You can’t drive around every day to go swimming, so we end up going to a friend’s pool if someone’s around. If all else fails we end up swimming on the roof of The Standard in Downtown. It’s close to our house and there’s good drinks.

What's your go-to summer album?
Various, we’re on tour pretty consistently, like most of the summer we’re going to be in Europe, and when you’re on tour you kind of end up listening to whatever the person who’s driving plays. I don’t know, Beach Boys are always good. I’m a huge Beach Boys fan. The album Surf’s Up is really amazing, Pet Sounds is great, the really early Beach Boys.

Speaking of what music you listen to, what are some bands you've had your eye on lately?
Meat Market is incredible. We did a tour with them about a year ago, and that was one of the most fun tours ever. I don’t think they have released on Burger yet, but they definitely have played a lot of Burger shows, like at South By they played and stuff. I know everyone in the band totally loves those guys. We just had The Garden open up for us a couple times, like at our Troubadour show, and those guys are really rad. I really like the hip-hop stuff they’ve been doing. Those are the big ones for me lately. Audacity, those guys are like our best buddies from way back, everything they do is awesome. They just released a new 10”. It’s not new, it’s like their lost album which they did when they were teenagers before their first album, which was Burger Records’ first proper LP release. So that just came out, and that’s really cool.

About a Band: Tomorrow's Tulips


All week long we'll be learning a little bit more about each of the bands in our Burger Records lookbook and feature. Up first: Tomorrow's Tulips.

If you could dream of the ultimate band to describe summer in California, who would it be? In my opinion, it would be Tomorrow's Tulips. Alex Knost and Ford Archbold, the duo that makes up the band, created some of the most perfectly "lo-fi"jams on their latest record Experimental Jelly that was just released on Burger Records last year. Knost and Archbold are just as sun-soaked as their music, both with bleach blonde hair and tan skin. Below, Alex tells me about why he started the band, his favorite spots to surf, and his top summer tunes.
Maddie
Photographs by Dominic Santos

Hi Alex! Tell me a little bit about how Tomorrow's Tulips formed.
I started Tomorrow's Tulips as a sort of refuge from the band I was currently in at the time. I needed a release from the frustration that was trying to make a "group work" and to play without over-analyzation or any premonition of what was needed to succeed. It was a fresh start to accept failure from a listener or onlooker, and simply create. I originally started the group with an ex-girlfriend playing drums.

You released Experimental Jelly just last year. Who or what were your main influences when recording the record?
Being in the open, having an exposed fragility; that is what binds humanity and emotion. Our world is masked by media, fashions, trends, and technology. The end result has been isolation, and that isolation stems insecurity and jealousy amongst a community. I wanted to write songs, or at least take a step towards being naked.



Do you feel living in California has a large influence on your music?
A person's environment is always a role in what they are producing. I think there's a mix of embracing that and also an effort to alienate it. It's the uncomfortable situation of staying where you know what's going on, much like living at your parents' house.

Aside from music, I know you are an avid surfer as well. What's your favorite place in California to surf?
I enjoy the beach breaks in between the track homes and parking meters.

What tunes are at the top of your summer playlist?
Television Personalities "Do You Know What They're Saying About Me Now" and Conspiracy of Owls "A Silver Song."

What's your favorite thing to do during the summer besides surfing and playing music?
Visit OCMA, ride a bicycle, and go to openings.

Fine Print: Stephen Shore


Stephen Shore has been a known name in photography since the 1960s. Since the age of six, he's been working and experimenting with photography, specifically color, and has become an inspiration for photographers around the world. His early work depicts America at more than just face value, full of rich colors and culture. His latest project took him to Israel for a collaborative project which came to be his new book, From Galilee to the Negev, out in early May from Phaidon. We met up with Stephen before his book signing at Space 15 Twenty to talk about the book, his early days, and the Mickey Mouse-shaped camera and darkroom kit that really kicked things off for him. Interview by Maddie Sensibile

Tell us about your new book, From Galilee to the Negev, and what you wanted to accomplish with it.

It grew out of a project. 12 photographers were commissioned to go to Israel and the West Bank and we were given pretty much free reign to do whatever we wanted. Because it was a large group of photographers, I didn’t feel like I had to do something definitive. In fact, I’m not sure anyone can do something definitive in a country as complex as Israel and the West Bank, so that freed me up to explore what I was interested in. I wanted to explore a lot of the rest of life in Israel, of what daily life is like; it doesn’t avoid the conflict because that’s part of daily life, but life is much more than that.



Your book almost has the feel of multiple series put together; there are landscape shots, portraits, and lots of detail shots. Is this how you wanted the book to feel?

Exactly. There are conflicts in Israel that exist outside of the Arab/Israeli conflict. There’s a lot of contention in the country. There’s contention between Greek Orthodox and Armenian Orthodox, there’s contention between ultra Orthodox Jews and reform Jews. There are all kinds of tensions. I wanted to not express the conflict but the idea that there are multiple voices that often talk past each other. In a way, I used multiple voices in the book which I think is what you’re picking up on.

What made you want to travel to this region of the world and make this collection of photographs over several years?
Well, I didn’t seek it out. The project was offered to me. Starting in the '90s, I began to photographically explore cultures other than North American culture. It was something that interested me, to bring what I’ve learned about getting a sense of a place and see if I can do that in a foreign place. So, I jumped at the chance when it was offered.



The book combines both digital and film photography. Do you feel that people will continue to use film even when digital photography has become so advanced?

I teach at Bard College and we still use film for the first two years. Students don’t use digital until they’ve spent two years working in a dark room; they spend at least a semester doing color processing and printing, and a semester with a 4x5 view camera. I love digital. All the prints I make are digital, all the photography I do now... I haven’t shot film since the Israel and West Bank book. I have absolutely nothing against digital. I think it’s allowing photographers to make a kind of picture that simply couldn’t have been made ten years ago. However, I think there is a tremendous amount that can only be learned through film.

You shot many photos of the Factory in black and white in the '60s. What made you want to shoot in color, as we see in American Surfaces and Uncommon Places?
There were a couple of events, one was in 1971. I started on two projects that both involved vernacular uses of photography. One was a series of postcards of Amarillo, TX, where I photographed the ten highlights of Amarillo and had the largest postcard printer in America make real postcards of them. Of course they were in color, because all postcards were in color then.

And the second?
The other series was a series of snapshots. Again, I wanted to bring a cultural reference of the style of the photograph to the meaning of it, so the image gained some meaning by being seen as a snapshot or as a postcard. This was a series called the Mick-A-Matics. They were taken with a camera, the Mick-A-Matic, which is a big plastic-headed Mickey Mouse with a lens in its nose. I had the pictures printed by Kodak, and they were also in color, and the Mick-A-Matic work led to American Surfaces. I wanted to continue something like the Mick-A-Matic, but with a camera that had finer optics than the plastic lens in Mickey’s nose. The one advantage of it, though, was every time I took a photo of a person, there was a genuine smile on their face. The other thing I really learned from doing the Mick-A-Matics was that part of the information that a picture can convey about a particular age in which it was taken is the palette of that age, which is out of the range of black and white.

What was your experience with color photography like prior to that point?
There was just one of these dumb events that could lead someone to think deep thoughts. I met a young composer at a party and he expressed an interest in seeing my photographs although he didn’t know much about photography. We went back to my apartment and I opened up a box, and his first reaction was “Oh, they’re black and white!” He had only seen snapshots, not art photographs, and he didn’t understand why they weren’t in color. He expected in that box would be color photographs. That led me to think about the snapshot and the postcard and why did this guy expect…I mean, I knew the art photography tradition. I knew color was light years from it; we didn’t see color in it. When I handed him the box, he thought it was going to be color. That, I found fascinating. I wanted to explore why he thought that. That’s when I started doing the postcards and the snapshots.

When you began taking photographs, who or what inspired you to do so?
I started because a relative of mine gave me a darkroom set for my sixth birthday. At first I wasn’t interested in taking pictures, I was only interested in taking my family’s snapshots and developing them and printing them. I did that for a couple of years. It wasn’t until I was eight and got a 35mm camera that I started photographing seriously. Before that, my real interest was darkroom work.



When you were 14, MOMA acquired your work, specifically Edward Steichen. Do you remember how you felt when that happened?
I don’t.

Would you say that was a pivotal moment in your career?
No. It wasn’t a pivotal event because I didn’t know enough for it be a pivotal event. On the other hand, if I knew more, I would’ve thought it was inappropriate to call up Steichen and ask to show him my work. So, my childish and naiveté led me to do that, but on the other hand it led me not to see it as a pivotal moment.

If you had one piece of advice for someone trying to get into photography and make it a career, what would it be?
Read my book published by Phaidon called The Nature of Photographs.

I'm With the Band: Cage the Elephant


It's no secret that Cage the Elephant are one of rock and roll's biggest names right now; they just released their third album, Melophobia, this past October, and have been on the move ever since. Melophobia is their strongest record yet, with ten solid tracks that will keep you listening over and over. I caught up with rhythm guitarist Brad Shultz last Friday in Ventura, CA just before the band hit the road to play Coachella's second weekend. Maddie

What were your primary influences when recording Melophobia?
I think, if there was any influence for me, it would be the local scene in Nashville. There’s a ton of awesome bands that are coming out of Nashville: Jeff the Brotherhood, Bad Cop, Plastic Visions, Ranch Ghost. There’s a really cool music scene in Nashville. I had some time off and I live in Nashville, so I really got into going to local shows and stuff.

What do you feel is different about this record from your previous records?
I think it's more in-depth, if that makes sense. It's the closest interpretation of what we envisioned in our minds, what we wanted to achieve musically of the three albums.


Left, Nick Bockrath and Matt Shultz during the band's encore. Right, Matt Shultz and Brad Shultz backtsage.

What made you guys want to call it something that means "fear of music"?
It’s not really a literal use of the word, it's just based on being afraid of creating music under any kind of false pretense.

What are your three tour essentials?
Internet [laughs], that’s for sure. And clean socks and underwear.

What do you guys do to prepare for a gig?
There’s no kind of ritual that we do, we kind of just hang out and create a good environment as far as just chilling and vibing out and listening to music, just being as relaxed as we can.

Okay, now tell me three songs you recommend listening to right now:
Yeah, Broken Bells “Holding on for Life,” Bad Cop “Light On,” and Plastic Visions “Little String.”

Okay, now choose! East Coast or West Coast?
I’m going to say central. No coast! Middle of the country, Nashville, TN!

Crushed or cubed?
Oh, Sonic ice. The sphere ice, that’s the best.

Old or new, in terms of music?
I’ll say new because new is influenced by old, but still pushing forward.

Clean or dirty?
What are we talking about?

Anything!
Clean. I’m gonna go with clean. I like to be showered and fresh.

Morning or night?
Late evening, I like the late evening.

Happenings: The Impossible Tour


Impossible made a stop this week at Urban Outfitters Costa Mesa to set up their unbelievably cool portable pop-up shop in the form of a silver Airstream trailer. Impossible USA is traveling around the country until October 2014 to share the power of the Polaroid. I met up with two of the guys from Impossible, Kyle and Mitch, to learn a little bit more about what's going on inside the trailer, nicknamed "Silver Shade."

Inside Silver Shade you'll find tons of film, cameras, and an even cooler photo booth. Mitch and Kyle also lead workshops in the little nook on the left side of the trailer (which looks like it came straight out of the 1960s). Curious individuals can step inside and try out the various films and cameras as well as learn all about what Impossible is doing. While there, Mitch taught me how to use the brand's new iLab, which allows you to take a photo on your iPhone, attach it to a Polaroid camera and then print a true Polaroid. It's totally cool, so definitely give it a try if you find the tour stopping in your town.

Silver Shade just got back from Coachella and will be stopping at various UO locations throughout the year. Visit Silver Shade when it comes to your town and give analog film life again! Maddie




I'm With the Band: Drowners

Drowners are currently making their way around the West Coast in support of their debut self-titled record. In their downtime between Coachella weekends, they made a stop in Los Angeles to bring their melodic, jumpy jams to The Roxy. Drowners are made up of Matt Hitt, Jack Ridley, Erik Lee Snyder, and Joe Brodie. I had a chat with Matt and Jack to talk about where the band is at right now, their favorite songs to play while DJing, and more. Maddie

Since we last talked you had your debut record come out. How was the recording process and putting it out?
Matt: We finished it about nine months before we actually released it, like a human pregnancy, so when it came out, we were ready for it to come out. It was kinda sitting on the shelf a bit. We did it over three weeks last May in a basement under a bar and Gus Oberg and Johnny T produced it. My 25th birthday passed as we were recording it, and that’s pretty much all I remember about it.

Matt, you've been part of other projects in the past. What's different about Drowners as opposed to your previous projects?
Matt: Literally only that I sing in this one. I do Threats with Jack. I kinda stopped doing all the other shit before Drowners started, so it's really just Threats and Drowners. The only differences are that I sing in one and Jack sings in the other, and he writes all Threats and I write all Drowners. Basically the only thing that switches between the two is who stands in the middle of the stage.

Tell us a little bit about the influences that went into your self-titled.
Matt:
The things we were influenced by to record were like, The Vapors, Gun Club, and we were inspired vocally by like, when you listen to '50s and '60s shit, like when they scream and the mic blanks out. That was kind of a main point of it. Slickness of Vapors, energy of Buzzcocks, yeah.
Jack:
I would say for me, since he obviously wrote the thing in his bedroom, I think it was done with a lot of pain and fun and late nights and such. You play in a different way when all that is going on around. Depending on how you feel you play a bit different. I feel like a lot of long nights and mild suffering in different ways led itself to a nice product.
Matt:
There’s like twenty different versions of the same song, depending on how we feel. Particularly live, it completely changes. Like how hard you want to play or how much you want to scream or how much you want to move, that’s just night to night. When we were doing the record, it was like Jack said, fun and pain; basically two sides of the same coin, where you’re like one or the other.

How would you describe Drowners in three words to someone who has never heard you before?

Matt: “I’d hit it.”
Jack: “Totally fucking awesome.”
Matt: Yeah, do that one.

What is your dream venue or city to play in?
Matt:
I’m gonna sound biased in L.A., but this is only the second time in L.A. and I’ve fucking had a right laugh both times I’ve come here. There’s not like ideal size or whatever. I like playing in front of people who give a shit, because that’s not always the case. That’s my favorite thing. When people give a shit it makes us get hyped on it.



If you could have a tour with anyone, who would it be? Dead or alive.
Matt:
On the top of my head, we did four gigs with Cage the Elephant and I’d want to do another tour with them that was longer. I only had four days of ultimate bliss and I’d like to have like, a month with it.

When you're not playing music, what are you usually up to?
Matt: Sleeping.
Jack: Drawing or skating and walking around. Cuddling with puppies. Cuddling with puppies and watching Law and Order SVU.

What are your go-to tracks when DJing?
Matt: I want to preface this with like, we DJ a lot because we’re absolutely broke and we all need to make money. It’s a job and shit. I started DJing after I moved to New York because I'd sit and listen to Jack and some other people DJ. My favorite three to play I stole completely off Jack. Gun Club "Sex Beat," "Red Hot" by Billy Lee Riley, and "Train Kept A Rollin'" by the Johnny Burnette Trio.
Jack: I would agree with that as well.
Matt: ‘Cause I stole it off you!
Jack: “Love and Desperation" is creeping up on me. That’s a sexy song.
Matt: That is my new absolute favorite song! It’s the singer of Gun Club.
Jack: Jeffrey Lee Pierce.
Matt: It’s the best shit I’ve heard since “Stoned and Starving” by Parquet Courts.

I'm With the Band: The Orwells feat. Criminal Hygiene


For the latest installment of this column, I interviewed The Orwells and Criminal Hygiene when they made a stop in Los Angeles at the Troubadour this past weekend. The Orwells are a relatively young band based out of Chicago, Illinois, while Criminal Hygiene are based out of L.A. Both bands have deep roots in punk and garage, and have a clear goal to make rock and roll stand on its own again. See what the boys had to say below.
Interview and photos by Maddie Sensibile


The Orwells featuring their pal Jack from Twin Peaks.

Introduce yourselves!

Henry: I’m Henry Brinner.
Mario: I’m Mario Cuomo.
Grant: I’m Grant Brinner.
Matt: I’m Matt O'Keefe.
Mario: We are the Orwells!

You released Remember When in 2012, then Other Voices and Who Needs You. What can we expect from the new record?

Mario: It’s more soulful. There’s some soul on it, there’s some swingin’ beats. You’ll like it.

What record or records have influenced you guys most as a band? I know you mention Is This It a lot on your Twitter.
Mario: Yeah, we talk about it. I love soul. I love like, Sam Cooke and really soulful stuff.
Grant: It’s all different for everybody. Everybody has different taste in music.
Mario: Lyrically, I love like, “Ooooh!” when you feel it in your heart. Pretty much just Kendrick.

If your music was made up of three ingredients, what would they be?
Entire band: Sugar, spice and everything nice.

Favorite festival you've ever played?

Mario: FYF!

If you could put on your own music festival, who would your dream headliners be?
Mario: Day one would be Waka Flocka for me.
Henry: Everybody’s dead, it sucks.
UO: They can be dead.
Mario: Oh, what the hell. Well, let me reiterate: Waka Flocka.
Henry: I think T. Rex, though.
Mario: Okay, T. Rex, Waka Flocka, and Har Mar Super Star.

If you could bring three things on tour and nothing else, what would they be?
Henry: Headphones.
Mario: Condoms, money and beef jerky.
Henry: My drums.

Now choose:
Taco Bell or Del Taco?
Henry & Mario: Taco Bell.

Mountain Dew or Dr. Pepper?
Henry & Mario: Mountain Dew

Boxers or Briefs?
Henry & Mario: Boxers
Mario: We’re so similar.

High or low?
Henry & Mario: High.

Saturday or Sunday?

Henry & Mario: Saturday.


Criminal Hygiene.

Hi guys! Introduce yourselves.
Michael F: I’m Michael Fiore.
Michael H: Michael Hiller.
Sean E: Hello, I’m Sean Erickson! We met Fiore at an Italian restaurant; turns out he was pretty good at guitar.

You just released the "Withdrawn" 7". Can you tell me a little more about who has influenced your sound?
Michael F: Actually, I wrote that song the day... well, I stayed up all night because one of my best friends went to jail for a DUI. It’s about that general mindset and feeling. So, that was influential. I was trying to be Rod Stewart when I was singing; it’s true, that’s what I was going for.

What's your favorite record to listen to while on the road?
Sean: Unfortunately, we have one of those stupid radio hookups. We’ve just been around the L.A. area so far, so we can’t really listen to it. It’s all static.
Michael F: When I’m driving places I like to listen to The Faces, and I’ve been playing the Mac DeMarco album a lot.

If you could put on your own music festival, who would your dream headliners be?
Michael H: I can answer for Sean and say it’s probably gonna be Jimmy Buffett.
Sean: ZZ Top would be one of them. KISS.
Michael F: The Shins, Replacements, Fugazi, and The Cigarette Bums.

Now choose:
Pepsi or coke?
Sean: Pepsi
Michel H: Coke
Michael F: Coke. Cherry Coke.

Scrambled or fried?
Michael F: Fried over medium.
Sean: Scramble it, cheese it, sauce it.

Stones or the Beatles?
Michael F: Beatles, for the most part.
Michael H: Can you pick both?
Michael F: What era? That’s where it gets fishy.
Michael H: There’s more shitty Stones albums than Beatles albums.
Sean: They’ve been around longer. They’ve had their chance.
Michael F: I like Exile more than I like Let It Be. But I like Sgt. Pepper’s more than I like Satanic - whatever that shit is.

Since it's festival season, real shower or fake a shower?
Sean: Oh yeah, bum shower. Baby wipes and McDonald’s sink.
Michael H: Real shower.
Sean: Real showers are beautiful, but they’re not always available. You gotta make do with the hand driers.
Michael H: Both.
Sean: I’d prefer to be on tour where you have to take showers in weird places.

Our World: Urban Renewal at Space 15 Twenty


Last week, Urban Outfitters opened a permanent Urban Renewal shop inside of Space 15 Twenty in Los Angeles. Bringing to life the Urban Renewal concept (a line of one-of-a-kind pieces crafted from vintage, deadstock and surplus materials from around the world), here you'll find anything and everything vintage-lovers could possibly want. Unique pieces made from denim, leather, and beautiful printed fabrics mingle with antique treasures and the perfect selection of pre-worn denim. From the candles and crystals by Spellbound Sky to the succulents hanging from the ceiling, this is a shop you'll want to take a few hours to explore. Maddie














Happenings: Urban Renewal at Space 15 Twenty

Opening this Sunday at Space 15 Twenty (1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd) in Los Angeles is Urban Outfitters' Urban Renewal shop. The shop, called "Crystals, Candles, & Champagne," will be having an opening party from 12PM-3PM. There will be tunes by DJ Lord Prince, crystal talk with Spellbound Sky, and nail art by KLEUR. You won't want to miss this, because you're definitely going to find some incredible vintage treasures inside. RSVP here. Maddie

I'm With the Band: Johnny Jewel


Over the weekend Chromatics and Glass Candy played the Converse Rubber Tracks Live x UO event at the Tower Theater in Los Angeles. Before the gig, I interviewed Johnny Jewel, a man who wears many different hats. The L.A.-based musician is a member of both Glass Candy and Chromatics, and is currently scoring a television show and an upcoming Ryan Gosling-directed film. Needless to say, Johnny is one busy guy. Interview by Maddie Sensibile

Hey Johnny! What have you been up to lately?

I just had my first vacation ever for Christmas, and it was really cool. I went to Mexico. I never end up taking vacations during Christmas or New Year's, and if I'm traveling or try to take an extra day off, some work always comes up. This time of year everyone is on vacation, so nothing happened, and I didn't take a computer or a phone. I didn't listen to music for two weeks. It was pretty crazy. I was a little scared at first. I view myself as being okay with that, but I was worried I was going to have withdrawals and be embarrassed by myself. So, I did that, and since then I've been scoring a TV show that I've been working on for 20 hours a day. With film and TV, the music is important, and it's always the last thing. They don't think about the fact that music has to be made in real time. It's crazy cross-training for making pop music! 

You performed twice at the Urban Outfitters Rialto launch party, with Glass Candy and Chromatics. What do you enjoy most about being part of two groups?


The bands are really similar in certain ways. We sound more like each other than Bon Jovi and Garth Brooks or something. Live, Chromatics is...there's more people, so it's more choreographed. Glass Candy is kind of a loose cannon. I never know what Ida is going to do. For me, it's fun to have the improvisational aspect of Glass Candy, which is always after Chromatics. Chromatics builds up this thick mood, and Glass Candy is like this huge explosion. Chromatics is more suspenseful and disciplined in a way, and Glass Candy is really punk. It's just me and Ida, so anything goes. Emotionally they are really different, too. I enjoy playing with Glass Candy more after I've played a Chromatics set, and I enjoy Chromatics better when I'm on tour with Glass Candy.

Regardless of what band you're playing in, who are some artists or eras that have long influenced you? 

Well, I grew up in Texas, like in the '80s, pre-internet. You kind of felt that you were really alienated because all of the action was on the coasts. Now it's different, because everybody travels everywhere. It was hard to even get certain records in our town. You would just see things on MTV or in magazines, and you lived vicariously through that. My relationship with music and art has always been through a distant looking glass. That's just the way I learned to interact with art. That hasn't changed, but I developed a kind of fixation for climates or regions. I'm really into tropical. Like I just went to Cancun, you know! I didn't do anything but build sandcastles and chill out. I've always been really fascinated with bodies of water and things like that. I like fashion photography from the '70s and '80s, like Helmut Newton: Really tropical fantasies. We're all huge fans of Andy Warhol and the whole Pop Art era.



Do you create all the art for your releases?

I do. It's not silk screened, and a lot of it's photocopied and cut paper, whatever I could do at Kinko's. I was trying to emulate Andy Warhol and Interview Magazine in the '80s, all those pencil drawing faces and stuff like that. To me, it was a cross between Art Deco and Punk. Again, growing up so isolated, ideas were everything. You'd see a photo and sort of fixate on it, and you didn't know anything about that place or time. I didn't know what New York was, and I didn't know what Paris was. I was in Texas and that's the center of the universe if you're Texan.

I know, I've grown up out here in L.A. my whole life, so everything is kind of happening here. I don't have that smaller town viewpoint.

What's weird is that I moved here in March, because I have to come out here so much for film [work]. And now I live here and I don't do anything. I stay in my house and my studio. I kind of live like a bird on a hill. I travel so much, I have more weekends in a year than most people because of touring, you know. So when I'm at home, I don't do anything. It's ironic. I'm in L.A., a big city, and it's a great city for music and art, and I find myself just kind of being at home almost like a hermit. And this would've been my dream growing up, like Los Angeles! Crazy! 

What's your favorite part about having your own record label, Italians Do It Better?

I'm not a perfectionist, but I refuse to answer to deadlines, which makes me kind of annoying in Hollywood, but they put up with it. The best thing about running your own label is that you can do whatever kind of packaging you want, and I can release any artist I want, any song I want. There's no fiscal pressure, none of the bands have deadlines, none of the bands have contracts, no employees, no overhead, no office. It's really cool. I call this guy, like, "Hey, I want to press 10,000 records," then I wire him the money and they disperse internationally. You can do anything with a phone and computer. It's cool to have this huge indie label and to have that freedom.


After Dark 2 artwork.


Since the new year has just begun, have you got any music related resolutions?

I want Chromatics to start practicing. We all live in different cities and haven't practiced in, like, five years. I'm excited about getting a tour space and doing a tour in the spring. I also have a few records I want to finish this year, so that's a resolution, and finally I want to commit to this poet from Texas, Farrah. I want to finish her album. Obviously there's a new Chromatics record, too. The project I'm most excited for outside of the bands is this film I'm scoring that was written by Ryan Gosling [How to Catch a Monster]. It's his first feature-length as a director. He's not in it. It stars Christina Hendricks, Saorise Ronin, Ben Mendelsohn, and the dude that plays Doctor Who [Matt Smith]. He's crazy, he's the villain. He's really disturbing, and psychotic. He has a shaved head, and he wears this gold lamé jacket and drives around with a beat up chair on top of a convertible in dying Detroit. The soundtrack is incredible. We've been working on it since February. It's gonna come out in October, and it's gonna be really cool. This French cinematographer shot it, so it's absolutely gorgeous if you like beautiful but strange cinema. 

Closet Project: Tara Violet Niami

Budding photographer, cinephile and model (and star of Samatha Pleet's latest look book), Tara Violet Niami isn’t your typical college sophomore. She owns a leather prom dress and collects Victorian flea market finds, while her style is inspired by the changing fashions of the early 1900s and the young protagonists of Little Women.
Interview by Maddie Sensibile; Photography by Amanda Charchian




Hi Tara! Tell me a little bit about yourself, and what you're up to right now.
At the moment I am studying fine art photography at the Pratt Institute and I am also doing other photography on the side, like fashion photos. In my free time I’m modeling as well.


Tara for Samantha Pleet S/S 14 photographed by Jacqueline Di Milia

When you walk into your closet, what are some essentials you always gravitate toward?
I really like my black oxfords, which are just really classic looking and worn out because I wear them so much. I generally like flat shoes. I'm also drawn towards patterns and interesting textures.

How would you describe your style?
Old fashioned, but with my own modern twist on it. I’m into drama in my clothes, and feeling like I’m a character in a movie or book. People that I look up to, style icons...I’m really into the 1900s. I guess because it was a very restrained time, both in terms of how women had to act in society, and how they had to dress. People found a way to express themselves in interesting ways with their own personal style. Also, growing up as a kid, I was really inspired by Little Women, and the idea of these really cool girls who would wear long dresses but would get them dirty and adventure around--I wanted to be like them. I like the idea that you should have fun in your clothes, even if you’re wearing something feminine, and you can mess it up.





You clearly love vintage. Where are your favorite places to search for special pieces?
In L.A., American Vintage on Melrose. The Melrose Flea Market is also really fun. There's also Jet Rag, which has a one dollar sale, and in Westwood, where my family lives, there's an Out of the Closet thrift store. I’ve found amazing things there, including a cashmere sweater for ten dollars. Those places are my go-to places in L.A.

What's the most treasured item in your closet?
I have this rainbow harlequin skirt that was my mom’s. I love it because it’s so colorful. I think it's from India, because it has batik symbols on it. I’ll never let that go. She also passed down to me this leather dress that I wore to prom. It's '50s style in the front with corset lacing in the back. It's really special. I don’t wear it that much, but I want to wear it more. Another thing that is super, super fragile that I love is a hand-embroidered 1920s dress that I wore to my graduation. It has butterflies on it and it reminds me of The Virgin Suicides.



What's your approach to skincare and makeup?
I don’t really wear makeup that often, but when I do, I’m really into lipstick, like wearing a red or plum color. I like the classic look of lipstick. It can dress up outfits too, and make you look more sophisticated and elegant.



Who inspires you?
Photographers that inspire me are Diane Arbus, William Eggleston, Edward Steichen, and Amanda [Charchian, who took these photos] is really amazing. And my friend Shae Detar, she hand-paints her photos. A photographer I’ve loved for years is Ellen Rogers, who’s British. She shoots large format and hand paints her photos, and they’re incredibly beautiful. They look like they’re out of a dream. And I always go back to the films I watched as a child: The Secret Garden and the Little Princess had a big influence on me, and still do. Those rebellious, complex girls in dresses. I don’t know, I just really like them.

Happenings: Urban Outfitters Heads to DTLA


Once home to a booming theater district, Downtown Los Angeles is reemerging as a bright light in the big city. The iconic streetcar is being brought back to Broadway, where Urban Outfitters debuted a new location on December 18 inside one of L.A.'s architectural gems, the Rialto Theatre building, which originally opened its doors in 1917. 


Located between the famous blue Eastern Building and Chinatown, the Rialto had fallen into disrepair, closing in 1987, but through the Bringing Back Broadway initiative, the new UO location is a pioneer in breathing new life into Downtown, where you can now grab a slice at NYC pizza legends Two Boots next door and soon stay at the Ace Hotel, set to open in the former United Artists studio building down the street.




With the Rialto Theatre marquee shining bright outside (lovingly restored along with the theater's original doors), inside you'll find a colossal selection of alphabetized vinyl records and a specially curated crop of Urban Renewal's latest vintage and re-worked finds. Suede fringe jackets mix with neon New Balance sneakers and vintage Fender and Gibson guitars line the walls, reflecting the eclectic style of the neighborhood's young denizens. The huge projection screen at the the rear of the store is a nice nod to the building's history, and will host a rotating selection of visual stimuli for your viewing pleasure. —Maddie Sensible