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I'm With the Band: Joyce Manor


FYF Festival may have been hectic this past weekend, but I managed to meet up with Los Angeles natives Joyce Manor for a quick interview before their set at the Main Stage on Saturday at the fest. They say their new record, Never Hungover Again, took them a few tries to get right, but once things got on track, it was all golden from there. Never Hungover Again is a more dramatic turn for the band but one that's in a totally right direction. Read what the band (Barry Johnson, Chase Knobbe, Matt Ebert, and Kurt Walcher) had to say just before I took their portrait in front of John F. Kennedy. Maddie

How are you guys? Are you happy about how the record has been received so far?

Barry:
We're very excited to be at FYF, extremely excited about how our record's been received. I felt like it was pretty different and no one's really acted that way. Like there was no "What happened to this band? They used to have something and they lost it."

A departure from your sound.


Barry:
I felt like it was more so than people have been acting. People have been like, you know, it's cool, they did what they did but made it different. People seem happy with it.

So tell me a bit about how you guys got things started for Never Hungover Again and the recording process for the record.


Barry: There was an entire first chunk of songs that we wrote and scrapped because they weren't up to scratch.
Chase: We recorded them, too.
Barry: We recorded them, and we were writing songs, and I think we were kinda stuck. We started writing songs that sounded like songs we had already written. I think we got a little set in our ways, a little comfortable, and then Chase came to practice and was like “Hey, I have this riff,” and I was like I kind of have a song, so we went “Do you want to try playing at the same time?” And then we did and it was like, that’s how the new record needs to sound. As soon as that happened, all six or seven songs we had were just scrapped.

How do you feel about playing FYF this year with such incredible bands on the lineup?

Chase:
We’ve played the past three years, but today’s the first time we’ve played the main stage. We’re officially small fish in the big pond. We’re in the big pond now, so now we just have to eat a bunch of other fish.

Do you have an ultimate goal as a band?

Barry:
We’ve already surpassed it. Our goal was to press vinyl and have a piece of vinyl that we made, and tour Japan, and we did them both. So, this is all fully bonus right now. As bonus as it wants to get is great, but we’ve already done everything we’ve set out to do.

Tell me three bands you’d like to have headline your dream festival.

Kurt:
Guided By Voices.
Barry: Who else would we get on that?
Chase: Toys That Kill.
Barry: Guided By Voices, Toys That Kill headlining…
Chase: Weird Al.

What have you been listening to lately?

Barry:
My friend Tony Molina sent me demos for his new record and I can’t stop listening to them.
All: Spirit of the Beehive, from Philly.

Near and Far: Victory Press x UO


Victory Press is designer Jessica Humphrey and artist Jonathan Cammisa, collaborating to create a collection of men’s clothing inspired by post modern art, prints and silhouettes of ‘80s skate and surf culture, and the functionality, integrity and ideology of ‘90s outdoors wear.

En route to launch a Victory Press pop-up event at our Los Angeles-based concept store Space 15 Twenty, Jess and Jonathan drove across the country, visiting American factories and getting up close and personal with the country’s great outdoors. Here, the design duo lets us in on every adventure of their nationwide trek.







How did you two come together and launch Victory Press?
Jess: Jonathan grew up in South Philadelphia skating. He was heavy into grafitti and hip hop, and he spent his summers at the Jersey Shore. I grew up in Virginia Beach surrounded by surfing and skateboarding, and as a teenager photographed every punk and hardcore band that came through my town. We met about five years ago in Vinegar Hill, a small neighborhood in Brooklyn. We both were obsessed with 1980s and ‘90s vintage clothing and we had the same taste in art and music, so we became best friends. We decided to start a clothing line out of a shared realization that outdoors wear just wasn't cool. We wanted to make outdoors wear that like-minded people want to wear.

Tell us about the Victory Press pop-up that brought you across the country!
Our friend Kyle came to our studio one day and proposed we set up shop at Space 15 Twenty for the summer of 2014. As a new brand, we were stoked on the opportunity to build out a space with our creative vision and spread our ideas to the West Coast. So, we though it was only appropriate to see the country on our way here so we can tell our story to you.







What was your favorite city or pit-stop along the way?
Mystic Hot Springs, Utah was by far the most interesting destination. We spent a few hours soaking in old claw foot tubs filed in with mineral rich hot springs with epic views of the Utah Mountains. Mystic Mike, who hosts the property, has an extensive collection of posters and stickers he's illustrated for touring bands, including the Grateful Dead. He also has a YouTube channel where he hosts live music and does an awesome job recording. There is also a collection of buses previously owned by Deadheads, for which you can rent and sleep over, if you want. It was truly a mystical moment. And then there was Yellowstone National Park—there are no words for how beautiful it is there.

Any travel mishaps?
Not really. We had good vibes on our side!

What was your day-to-day life like on the road?
We woke up. I'd heat us up some Grady's Coffee we cold brewed the night before. I might have some time to make breakfast while the boys break down the camp. If not, it was Early Bird Granola and yogurt and then we were on the road. Some days were long drives—almost 14 hours. We literally drove until it was time to sleep. Our meals that day would be "Jon's Back Seat Turkey Sandwiches" and the good old gas station special. The other days we'd drive for six hours or so and set up camp. We'd cook chili or hamburgers, relax, shoot our BB gun, then go to sleep extra early, wake up, maybe do a hike and then hit the road again. We were lucky enough to spend a good stint in Yellowstone and Utah where we could meander a little more and soak up the environment. We drove through 15 states in seven days, so there wasn't a whole lot of time to stay idle.







What were some of the best and worst meals you had while traveling?
The best meal was the chili we cooked over campfire the first night in Yellowstone. We brought our cast iron dutch oven and made a slow cooked chili and cornbread. We set up camp with the Grand Teton mountains as our backdrop, with no other human in site. It was magical. We actually ruled on the food tip. Even the sixth time we had turkey sandwiches, they were delicious!

What are your top five travel essentials?
Our trusty Birkenstocks, Oberto Beef Jerky, Snowpeak Titanium Stove, our dog, Jasper, and Santa Maria Novella Potpourri (for the stinky truck).

What advice would you give to someone about to embark on a cross-country trip?
Give yourself a good month because there is too much awesomeness to see.





The Victory Press x Ours Gallery summer pop-up shop at Space 15 Twenty (1520 N. Cahunega Blvd) is open now and runs through July 27, 2014.


UPDATE: Now you can watch the video Victory Press made with the help of Nathan Caswell about their cross country trip!

About a Band: Liars


Before heading out to Chicago and hitting the stage at our next Afterfest, we wanted to catch up with Liars’ guitarist Aaron Hemphill to hear what the band has been up to, listening to and looking forward to, following the release of their seventh album, Mess.
Photography by Zen Sekizawa and Jiro Schneider




Hi Aaron! What have you been up to since we last spoke? (For the “Mess on a Mission” video.)
I’m not sure if we’ve ever been as busy as we have been in the last few months, but we’ve gotten to do some amazing projects and it’s all to do with Liars so I’m definitely not complaining. In between playing more shows in support of Mess, we hosted and curated an event called Friday Flights at The Getty Museum in Los Angeles, which was really special. We assembled and installed a wide range of visual pieces all exclusive to the event and space. We also got to involve our very special friends like Mary Pearson Andrew, John Wiese, Kate Hall and Protect Me to do the same. At the moment, Angus and I are working on a special project that’s somewhat a secret at the moment, but we’ll be dropping clues on our social media and website to keep everybody informed as soon as we are able to. When we last met, our beloved Clippers were still alive in the NBA playoffs, so we’ve been dealing with the crushing blow of our early dismissal and are looking forward to the future and rebuilding for next season.

In the immediate future we have some exciting plans, all things we’ve never done before. First we are going to be performing at the Roskilde Festival where some little band called the Rolling Stones will be headlining. After that we are performing at All Tomorrow’s Parties (ATP) in Iceland—our first performance and trip ever to that country!

Really, we’ve been super busy and we’re so grateful for all of these amazing opportunities.





Can you tell us about the process of making Mess? Is there anything you would do differently if you had the chance?
The process of making Mess was all about immediacy and trying not to over analyze too much. WIXIW was such an intense experience where personal issues mixed with our inexperience with tools we were using. This led us to a very critical, doubtful, and calculated process. With Mess we had more experience with the music programs and we really felt grateful to be in the position to make records. It was a much more relaxed and confident atmosphere that I think was—dare I say—more playful. It’s not to compare one album with the other; it’s more that both records were made over a period of time where as we moved forward, the more we learned, and the more songs were able to flow with less debate. There are always things you wish you did differently, but you always realize that it’s better to learn from it than to be able to change it. Whatever happens is part of the album, and the experiences around it that you hope to incorporate into the music. If every record was perfect you might lose any sense of place or timing the album should hold.

What can we expect from your upcoming Afterfest performance?
To be honest, our live shows are similar to how we write our records. If we start feeling too comfortable with what we are doing, we naturally gravitate towards an environment where we are forced into feeling like complete novices. We like to feel that anything can happen, both good and bad, during a performance. It’s been our experience that when we play a show where we feel there were no mistakes, this rarely equates to what the crowd feels is a great show. This contrast is what keeps putting on a great performance a mystery and not a formula, which is great since there is the band experience meeting with the crowd’s experience. That said, I think the highest expectation we could hope to attain is for the crowd to expect the unexpected.

Are there any bands you’re excited to check out while in Chicago?
There are certainly a lot of great artists performing that we admire. I’m sure Kelela, Grimes and our friends Factory Floor will all be amazing.

And any spots you like to visit whenever you’re in Chicago?
Chicago is a great city. While we’ve been there many times on tour, we’ve never had any time to take in the sights. We’ll be so preoccupied with preparing for our show, we won’t be able to devote the time and attention a great city like Chicago deserves.

What’s been one of the best parties you’ve ever been to (besides this Afterfest, of course)?
For Angus’ birthday we raced go-karts and went to a Clippers game. We don’t have much downtime and when we do we tend to spend it apart doing our separate things, which is totally understandable. It’s nice to get together outside of band situations and cut loose a bit.





We saw the recent video you did with Yoonha Park for “Pro Anti Anti.” How did that come about?
What we like to do is give the directors complete freedom to execute their interpretation of the song. For all of our videos that aren’t directed by a band member, the story and vision is all from the director. One of the reasons we prefer this method is because we feel it adds another meaning or possibility for the song’s interpretation by having someone else’s vision represent the track. While in certain circumstances we like to make the videos ourselves, we fear that if we do it too often it might be perceived as how the song should be heard. We feel that once we’ve released the album, the song’s meanings are no longer strictly based on our perspective. Any misinterpretation is not only welcomed, it’s an invaluable part of us being able to learn what has been communicated by our album.

The ending was awesome, but do you wish you had gotten to keep the busts of yourselves?
I don’t know… for me it was really hard seeing my head that way. I got to see angles of myself that I’m more than happy never to see again!

What do you think are the best albums of 2014 so far? Any upcoming releases you’re stoked for?
Container’s Adhesive 12" is amazing. Also, HTRK’s Psychic 9-5 Club is pretty amazing. I’m excited for the new Grimes record, though I’m not sure when it’s due to come out. We did some shows with Jana Hunter recently where she played some of the new Lower Dens tracks solo. From what we’ve heard, the new Lower Dens record should be pretty amazing.

What are you listening to currently?
The two records I mentioned above are played quite frequently. I recently got a hold of Free Kitten’s discography, which is awesome. I think Kim Gordon’s bass playing was so huge in defining Sonic Youth’s sound. If you imagine any song of theirs with a different bass player, with a different bass line, you might argue that it’s the backbone of their sound. I got to see Free Kitten play once back in the day and it made such a huge impression on me. At the time I hadn’t ever made songs or played in a band but I had been playing guitar since I was really young. They sort of fortified the concept in my head that anything is possible. I know that sounds cliché, but I can’t describe it any other way.



Come see Liars at #AFTERFEST in Chicago on Friday, July 18th! Click here to RSVP.

As always, Making Time DJs Dave P. and Sammy Slice...UNITED will be DJing our Chicago event. Listen to
July's edition of Making Time RADio here!

Happenings: Afterfest Making Time Chicago


Chicago, listen up! We're excited to announce that for this year's Afterfest our friends Liars and Vatican Shadow will be performing at The Mid (306 N. Halsted St.) on Friday, July 18, from 10pm-4am. As always, Making Time's resident DJs Dave P. and Sammy Slice will be continuously DJing throughout the night. Admittance is free with RSVP, but make sure to arrive early to guarantee entrance. We hit capacity last year (thanks, everyone!) and expect the same to happen this year. Read our recent feature with Liars here and watch their video for "Mess on a Mission" below. See you in Chicago!



Click here to RSVP for #AFTERFEST

Studio Visit: Three Potato Four

Stu Eli and Janet Morales are moving away from owls, beards, and "I Heart NY" sweatshirts. The couple's seven-year-old brand, Three Potato Four, is a line of homewares, accessories and ephemera, for which they design and source U.S. manufacturers for antique-inspired objects. What began as an online platform to fund a mutual obsession with the thrill-of-the-hunt quickly evolved into a full-fledged business, eventually allowing Stu and Janet to create their own line of new items based on favorite vintage and Americana discoveries.  Studio visit photography by Michael A. Muller

 
Three Potato Four recently collaborated with Urban Outfitters' new Herald Square location on Souvenir Shop, a pop-up gift stand inside the store that offers an exclusive collection of New York-inspired objects. 

This weekend, the Souvenir Shop will pay homage to summer travels (or wanderlust) with a special postcard event. A variety of 3P4-designed NYC postcards will be available for customers to send a special message home—with pens, stamps, and a UO artist-designed mailbox included. 

Looking forward to the event, we took a quick trip to the 3P4 headquarters in small-town Pennsylvania, where we explored their studio and chatted about Charlie Brown ephemera, moving away from tchotchkes, and keeping up with trends. (If you're wondering, whales and owls are out; typography is in.)


Above: The 3P4 studio pegboard, including souvenir pendants, arrows, and a knot reference guide.

Can you tell us more about how 3P4 started? 
Stu: We started the company in 2007 as on online retail business, wanting to sell gifts, housewares, and fun novelty things from overseas that you couldn't find regularly over here. We also had a good bit of antiques, which sold really well so we decided to focus on shaping the business around that. After awhile we got into producing, sourcing, and manufacturing our own items in the United States based on the best-found or most-favorited vintage pieces. 

So this was really on the forefront of the whole Americana-influenced aesthetic that's been so big over the last few years. 
Stu: It was totally right-place, right-time; [when we started] the only place you could really shop for antiques online was on eBay. I think Etsy only had two vintage sellers at that time. All of that was in its infancy. 


Above: Framed maps, a 1950s circus poster, a mounted wooden first aid kit, and an illustrated guide to flowers

How have you avoided getting stuck in that genre? 
Stu: We've had to change our business every year based on trends and what's hot.  When we started it was all owls! 
Janet: It also helps that we have different taste and different backgrounds. 
Stu: Yeah, she has a design background and mine is in business. We are also into different things: I love '70s-'80s fun novelty stuff, like motorcycle-meets-MAD Magazine, with a touch of humor. There's so much seriousness with trends that feel really outdoors and camping-centered and, like, 'I'm an Adirondack Mountains man.'

So no more beards? 
Stu: No more beards.  



Above: Piles of paper ephemera fill a huge table in the studio wall, ranging from postcards and ticket stubs to cigar receipts and printed french fry bags. 3P4 sells "Paper Packs" of unique ephemera, each filled with a combination of numbers, type, pattern, graphics, and color.  

What about you, Janet? 
Janet: My style was originally more feminine, that's when DIY was really big. I'm a designer so I'm always drawn to things with nice type and that feel graphic.  




Above: An inventory of 3P4's linen portraits (and a taped-up reference for packing). Each of the paintings in the Portrait Study Series is based on original found early Twentieth Century artwork.

What about your own collections? What objects are you most drawn toward? 
Stu: When we first started we were big collectors: Mid-century stuff, ephemera, natural history… 
Janet: Lots of vials and specimens. 
Stu: Right. But since we've bought so much and it's passed through our hands, it's less that we keep. 
Janet: It's easier to pass things along to someone else. 

So no collections now?
Stu: Our house is pretty pared-down now. It's mostly kids' toys and laundry. 



Above: A 3P4 banner modeled after an antique biological study print of a rhino; a row of multicolor lights originally part of a seaside amusement rollercoaster ride in the 1950s. 

What have been some all-time favorite buys? 
Stu: My favorite find was a hand-carved 3D, folk-art style sculpture of Charlie Brown. It was something where there was clearly only one of them made and it was put together with such care. That said, it was clearly not for everyone! I think that's a lot of what our business is—'things' are so rooted in nostalgia. Sometimes people see something and just have to have it.
Janet: I think that's the entire idea behind Souvenir Shop—it's the feeling of going to a cool news stand full of special things, which [I think] is a hard thing to find in New York. We weaned to make new things that felt special, especially if you were a visitor.  
Stu: It's not an "I Heart NY" sweatshirt.


Above: A hand-stitched felt banner version of 3P4's Ace of Spades design, inspired by popular American folklore and iconography surrounding the Ace of Spades playing card, which was made popular by WWII and Vietnam war soldiers and then later by American motorcycle clubs. 

What other items are you continually on the hunt for? You mentioned loving natural history.
Stu: Yeah, one thing that really stands out was this set of vials filled with sand that this guy had collected and marked. For example, one filled from when he went to the Mohave Desert. I love that someone sought out to do this and kept it together.  
Janet: I think rather than always looking for something in particular, we're looking for something that when we see it, when know it. Those moments when you're just like, "This is it!" 




New York customers can visit Three Potato Four's Souvenir Shop at UO Herald Square (1333 Broadway), and be sure to stop by this weekend for their exclusive postcard pop-up, which starts on Thursday, July 3 and runs until postcards run out.

For the Record: Sharon Van Etten

Things people are saying about musician Sharon Van Etten’s new album, Are We There, include: 


1. “…a masterpiece, an album of extraordinary depth and sophistication that finds the New York singer and songwriter in full command of her considerable talent. (via Paste)
2. “…her most present-tense album to date, her most immediate and urgent—the peak of a steady upward trajectory. (via Pitchfork)
3. “A poignant tour-de-force, the message of Are We There is urgent, its delivery selfless” (via Pretty Much Amazing)

The record, Van Etten’s fourth, was released in late May, and like all of her work, it’s an earnestly vulnerable and deeply personal album filled with, as she explains, “songs that hurt like hell.” It is an often gut-wrenching trip through the complexities of a relationship. It is an appropriate use of the word “heavy,” but in a way that is satisfyingly sincere.  

Van Etten has spoken widely—widely!—about the album’s inception, from the break-up that inspired much of its architecture to feeding the songwriting cycle that her career has so-far dictated. 

Leading up to her UO “For the Record” vinyl signing on Thursday, July 3 at our Westover Road store in Portland, OR, we opted to lighten the mood by inviting Sharon to channel her own stomping grounds from the road—asking her to tell us all about her favorite things in NYC, from her ideal summer day in the city to her favorite haunts, from apartment horror stories to what its like to see Julie Andrews at the dentist.


This is Sharon Van Etten’s New York.

Years in the city? 
10 

Current neighborhood? 
Village

New York in the summer: what's on your itinerary for an ideal day?  
Bike Ride along the West Side, picnic, then read on a bench.

What was your first job in New York? 
Salesman at Astor Wines

Tell me a story about your worst New York apartment. 
I moved to Linden Street off the JZ line in 2005 and the neighbors told me they didn't want me in their neighborhood: Literally told me they didn't want me in their neighborhood after I had just moved in. They made sure I didn't feel comfortable on their block.

What's the most recent, truly great thing you saw in New York?
I saw The Great Beauty at Angelika. So moving.  So vivid.  And afterward, I went to Veloce wine bar and had amazing wine. Perfect evening.

Where in the city do you go to be alone?
I love going to Film Forum and IFC to movies by myself and wine bars, in general. Also, the Comedy Cellar when I am feeling low.

Tell me about a favorite New York memory.
I went to my dentist and as I was paying my bill, Julie Andrews walked in. I was immediately in tears. Childhood hero.

What's something very New York that you refuse to do?
Hang out in Times Square

What's something very New York that you shamelessly love?
The city skyline at the waterfront by the promenade driving in a cab at night.

Please share your best NYC survival tip.
Don't be an asshole, but be kind of on-guard while helping people. And work your ass off.

What makes someone a New Yorker?
 Living here and working here and helping people do the same.


Method of transportation?  
Subway

Bar where you're a regular? (and what's your poison?)  
Four Faced Liar, Bourbon and beer

Spot for leisurely brunch? 
Joseph Leonard

Spot for a celebratory dinner? 
Palma

Morning coffee shop and order? 
Americano at Joe's 

Favorite music store? 
Princeton Record Exchange (sorry! In Jersey!)

Music venue?  
Bowery Ballroom

Where do you get your news? 
Gothamist and New York Times

Place to see art?  
MoMA

Place to be outside? 
Washington Square Park or the West Side

Easy summer day trip?  
Long Beach Island

Place for a group hangout?  
My friend Taylor's house

Place to people-watch?  
Washington Square Park

Place to be inspired?  
Everywhere

SHOP SHARON'S VINYL PICKS

And if you're in Portland, be sure to stop by Sharon's UO "For the Record" vinyl signing Thursday, July 3 from 4-5pm at the Urban Outfitters on Westover Road, Portland, OR.

Happenings: For The Record Schedule


(Photo credit: Samantha Urbani)

For those of you who haven't heard, we here at UO have started a brand new music program called For The Record. Basically, we'll be bringing in touring artists to your local Urban Outfitters to sign vinyl, promote their tours and hang out with fans in a relaxed setting. We had our first For The Record vinyl signing in April of this year in our Chicago stores and the success of it all means we won't be stopping anytime soon. Some of the artists we've worked with so far have been St. Vincent, Black Lips, MØ, and The Head and the Heart, and we have a lot more planned for you all. Below, check out the signings we have coming up.

SCHEDULE



Who: Dev Hynes (of Blood Orange) and Gia Coppola, available for a vinyl signing. Gia will be signing the Palo Alto soundtrack, and Dev will be signing Cupid's Deluxe.
When: June 12th from 2:00-3:00pm
Where: Urban Outfitters Herald Square (1333 Broadway, NYC, NY)

Urban On Insiders: Get an exclusive meet and greet 15 minutes before the signing. Check the app for details! If you're not an Urban On Insider yet, click here to learn more.



Who:
Eleanor Friedberger
When:
June 14th from 3:00-4:00pm
Where:
Space Ninety 8 (98 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, NY)



Who: Eagulls
When:
June 14th from 4:30-5:30pm
Where:
Space Ninety 8 (98 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, NY)



Who: CHVRCHES
When:
June 15th from 12:00-1:00pm
Where:
Space Ninety 8 (98 N. 6th St., Brooklyn, NY)



Who: Little Dragon
When:
June 21st from 1:00-2:00pm
Where:
Urban Outfitters Herald Square (1333 Broadway, NYC, NY)

Make sure to share your signing experiences with the hashtag #fortherecord

Fine Print: Stephen Shore


Stephen Shore has been a known name in photography since the 1960s. Since the age of six, he's been working and experimenting with photography, specifically color, and has become an inspiration for photographers around the world. His early work depicts America at more than just face value, full of rich colors and culture. His latest project took him to Israel for a collaborative project which came to be his new book, From Galilee to the Negev, out in early May from Phaidon. We met up with Stephen before his book signing at Space 15 Twenty to talk about the book, his early days, and the Mickey Mouse-shaped camera and darkroom kit that really kicked things off for him. Interview by Maddie Sensibile

Tell us about your new book, From Galilee to the Negev, and what you wanted to accomplish with it.

It grew out of a project. 12 photographers were commissioned to go to Israel and the West Bank and we were given pretty much free reign to do whatever we wanted. Because it was a large group of photographers, I didn’t feel like I had to do something definitive. In fact, I’m not sure anyone can do something definitive in a country as complex as Israel and the West Bank, so that freed me up to explore what I was interested in. I wanted to explore a lot of the rest of life in Israel, of what daily life is like; it doesn’t avoid the conflict because that’s part of daily life, but life is much more than that.



Your book almost has the feel of multiple series put together; there are landscape shots, portraits, and lots of detail shots. Is this how you wanted the book to feel?

Exactly. There are conflicts in Israel that exist outside of the Arab/Israeli conflict. There’s a lot of contention in the country. There’s contention between Greek Orthodox and Armenian Orthodox, there’s contention between ultra Orthodox Jews and reform Jews. There are all kinds of tensions. I wanted to not express the conflict but the idea that there are multiple voices that often talk past each other. In a way, I used multiple voices in the book which I think is what you’re picking up on.

What made you want to travel to this region of the world and make this collection of photographs over several years?
Well, I didn’t seek it out. The project was offered to me. Starting in the '90s, I began to photographically explore cultures other than North American culture. It was something that interested me, to bring what I’ve learned about getting a sense of a place and see if I can do that in a foreign place. So, I jumped at the chance when it was offered.



The book combines both digital and film photography. Do you feel that people will continue to use film even when digital photography has become so advanced?

I teach at Bard College and we still use film for the first two years. Students don’t use digital until they’ve spent two years working in a dark room; they spend at least a semester doing color processing and printing, and a semester with a 4x5 view camera. I love digital. All the prints I make are digital, all the photography I do now... I haven’t shot film since the Israel and West Bank book. I have absolutely nothing against digital. I think it’s allowing photographers to make a kind of picture that simply couldn’t have been made ten years ago. However, I think there is a tremendous amount that can only be learned through film.

You shot many photos of the Factory in black and white in the '60s. What made you want to shoot in color, as we see in American Surfaces and Uncommon Places?
There were a couple of events, one was in 1971. I started on two projects that both involved vernacular uses of photography. One was a series of postcards of Amarillo, TX, where I photographed the ten highlights of Amarillo and had the largest postcard printer in America make real postcards of them. Of course they were in color, because all postcards were in color then.

And the second?
The other series was a series of snapshots. Again, I wanted to bring a cultural reference of the style of the photograph to the meaning of it, so the image gained some meaning by being seen as a snapshot or as a postcard. This was a series called the Mick-A-Matics. They were taken with a camera, the Mick-A-Matic, which is a big plastic-headed Mickey Mouse with a lens in its nose. I had the pictures printed by Kodak, and they were also in color, and the Mick-A-Matic work led to American Surfaces. I wanted to continue something like the Mick-A-Matic, but with a camera that had finer optics than the plastic lens in Mickey’s nose. The one advantage of it, though, was every time I took a photo of a person, there was a genuine smile on their face. The other thing I really learned from doing the Mick-A-Matics was that part of the information that a picture can convey about a particular age in which it was taken is the palette of that age, which is out of the range of black and white.

What was your experience with color photography like prior to that point?
There was just one of these dumb events that could lead someone to think deep thoughts. I met a young composer at a party and he expressed an interest in seeing my photographs although he didn’t know much about photography. We went back to my apartment and I opened up a box, and his first reaction was “Oh, they’re black and white!” He had only seen snapshots, not art photographs, and he didn’t understand why they weren’t in color. He expected in that box would be color photographs. That led me to think about the snapshot and the postcard and why did this guy expect…I mean, I knew the art photography tradition. I knew color was light years from it; we didn’t see color in it. When I handed him the box, he thought it was going to be color. That, I found fascinating. I wanted to explore why he thought that. That’s when I started doing the postcards and the snapshots.

When you began taking photographs, who or what inspired you to do so?
I started because a relative of mine gave me a darkroom set for my sixth birthday. At first I wasn’t interested in taking pictures, I was only interested in taking my family’s snapshots and developing them and printing them. I did that for a couple of years. It wasn’t until I was eight and got a 35mm camera that I started photographing seriously. Before that, my real interest was darkroom work.



When you were 14, MOMA acquired your work, specifically Edward Steichen. Do you remember how you felt when that happened?
I don’t.

Would you say that was a pivotal moment in your career?
No. It wasn’t a pivotal event because I didn’t know enough for it be a pivotal event. On the other hand, if I knew more, I would’ve thought it was inappropriate to call up Steichen and ask to show him my work. So, my childish and naiveté led me to do that, but on the other hand it led me not to see it as a pivotal moment.

If you had one piece of advice for someone trying to get into photography and make it a career, what would it be?
Read my book published by Phaidon called The Nature of Photographs.

UO DIY: Plant Hanger


During our outdoor potted plant DIY at our Malibu store, we had one of our talented associates give us her (easy) step-by-step guide on how to make our very own plant hangers. Read on for full instructions, then go make your own! (And we promise, even if you don't have a single Martha Stewart bone in your body, you'll be able to make this.)

DIY Plant Hanger Instructions

Needed:
Spool of cord
(something durable, can be found in jewelry aisle of craft stores)
Key ring
Small potted plant



1) Cut 4 lengths of cord, about 10 inches longer than you want the planter to be when finished.



2) Fold the 4 cords in half at their midpoint. Slide the key ring up to the midpoint and tie a knot to keep it in place.



3) Separate the 8 cords into groups of two. About 8 inches down from the key ring, you are going to tie a basic square knot with the first two cords.



4) To tie the square knot, loop the two cords over each other, as if you're about to tie your shoelaces. Then loop the cords around each other a second time, leading with the opposite cord you started with.

5) Follow this step for the remaining groups of 2 cords. You should be left with 4 knotted strands. 



6) Grab a friend to hold your plant hanger up, or hook the key ring to something. Take the right cord from the first set, and the left cord from the second set about 10 inches down from the knots you've already tied. Tie another square knot.

7) Repeat this with the right cord from the 2nd set, and the left cord from the 3rd set. Continue with the remaining cords.



8) Gather all the cords together and tie in a big knot.



9) Fit your potted plant inside the hanger and enjoy!

Read full Get Outside feature

Happenings: The Impossible Tour


Impossible made a stop this week at Urban Outfitters Costa Mesa to set up their unbelievably cool portable pop-up shop in the form of a silver Airstream trailer. Impossible USA is traveling around the country until October 2014 to share the power of the Polaroid. I met up with two of the guys from Impossible, Kyle and Mitch, to learn a little bit more about what's going on inside the trailer, nicknamed "Silver Shade."

Inside Silver Shade you'll find tons of film, cameras, and an even cooler photo booth. Mitch and Kyle also lead workshops in the little nook on the left side of the trailer (which looks like it came straight out of the 1960s). Curious individuals can step inside and try out the various films and cameras as well as learn all about what Impossible is doing. While there, Mitch taught me how to use the brand's new iLab, which allows you to take a photo on your iPhone, attach it to a Polaroid camera and then print a true Polaroid. It's totally cool, so definitely give it a try if you find the tour stopping in your town.

Silver Shade just got back from Coachella and will be stopping at various UO locations throughout the year. Visit Silver Shade when it comes to your town and give analog film life again! Maddie




Happenings: Spring Kickoff & Plant DIY Workshop

This Saturday, March 29, from 2pm-5pm, we'll be hosting an outdoor Spring kickoff gathering at our Malibu store (3806 Cross Creek Road). There will be snacks for everyone in attendance, as well as a stocked DIY station for painting, decorating and potting planters. The best part? It's all free, so everyone will be able to go home with a brand new houseplant. (Ready for a timely Oprah reference from 2004? "EVERY-BO-DY GETS A PLANTER!")

During the event, photographer Ryan Brabazon will be shooting for a blog feature, so bust out that dry shampoo because there's a chance you may see your beautiful self pop up on our site in the weeks to come. Since our Malibu store hosts one of the cutest outdoor spaces around (with WiFi - perfect for Instagrammin'), we can't think of a better place to chill and craft in the sunshine. See ya soon, Malibu!

Friday Download: February 7, 2013

Okay, so I'm like, way too old to be getting excited about festivals, yet here I am, getting excited over festivals. I'm like an overstimulated baby this week, just barfin' and clappin' and barfin' over all these festival announcements. Mostly because my brain has now tricked my body into believing that summer is just around the corner and it's not, but whatever. Here are some fun things announced this week that give us a little bit to look forward to, even if they are six months away. Katie



Newport Folk Festival rolls out lineup
I love the Folk Festival. It's in Newport, RI, so it's not unbearably hot, and the crowd is a mix of young folk and nice granddads in straw hats, which rules. (No one will barf on you!) The festival is also small enough that you're not going to kill yourself going from stage to stage. NPFF started announcing their lineup this week, and they're going aaagonizingly slow, but Jenny Lewis has already been announced, as has Mavis Staples and Houndmouth, so I'm excited to see who else will be announced in the coming days.



Sasquatch! double weekend
Whoa
, look at all that. Sasquatch! Festival is happening two weekends this year, and each lineup is different. Pretty cool idea. For $550, you can get tix to both weekends, and for a mere $10,000/pair, you can get tix that come with a furnished safari hut! (If I were a teenage millionaire, you better believe I would be buying those.) Get a closer look at each of the lineups here.



Bonnaroo lineup announcement
I like that people hype up announcements. It makes me feel very millennial, very 2014, y'all. And it's exactly what Bonnaroo is doing with their lineup announcement this year, which is also what they did last year, I guess. This year they'll be announcing everything February 19th. There will even be a pre-show leading up to the announcement, so hold on to your hats, everyone.



Billy on the Street season 3
If you don't watch the incredible show that is Billy on the Street, please start. The new season starts up March 12, and you can watch the trailer for it here. (Paul Rudd will be on it, so that should be enough to convince you.)


 



Portlandia shoots in Urban Outfitters
You should totally watch until the end of this exclusive Portlandia clip because we are in it. (Faaaame, we're gonna live forever.) And if you haven't heard, we love Portlandia so much that we're currently doing a giveaway celebrating the return of the show. You can win a trip for two to Austin, as well as invitations to a Portlandia panel with Carrie and Fred. For more details and to enter, click here.

Happenings: Urban Outfitters Heads to DTLA


Once home to a booming theater district, Downtown Los Angeles is reemerging as a bright light in the big city. The iconic streetcar is being brought back to Broadway, where Urban Outfitters debuted a new location on December 18 inside one of L.A.'s architectural gems, the Rialto Theatre building, which originally opened its doors in 1917. 


Located between the famous blue Eastern Building and Chinatown, the Rialto had fallen into disrepair, closing in 1987, but through the Bringing Back Broadway initiative, the new UO location is a pioneer in breathing new life into Downtown, where you can now grab a slice at NYC pizza legends Two Boots next door and soon stay at the Ace Hotel, set to open in the former United Artists studio building down the street.




With the Rialto Theatre marquee shining bright outside (lovingly restored along with the theater's original doors), inside you'll find a colossal selection of alphabetized vinyl records and a specially curated crop of Urban Renewal's latest vintage and re-worked finds. Suede fringe jackets mix with neon New Balance sneakers and vintage Fender and Gibson guitars line the walls, reflecting the eclectic style of the neighborhood's young denizens. The huge projection screen at the the rear of the store is a nice nod to the building's history, and will host a rotating selection of visual stimuli for your viewing pleasure. —Maddie Sensible


Photo Diary: Art Basel Miami Beach

Photo Diary by Jackie Linton

Art Basel Miami Beach is a mad dash; by cab, foot or rented bike, it’s nearly impossible to see all the absurdity, abundance and amazement that the fairs, events and parties have to offerespecially if you sometimes secretly just want to be at the beach! Banner planes fly overhead promoting energy drinks and club nights, and soon enough, once you’ve immersed yourself in the culture of this art week, it won’t seem foreign or unappetizing, to consider either option. There are certainly more things I wish I saw and experienced while I was there, but I’m already looking forward to next year. Here are some of my highlights from three top art fairs, and my first trip to Miami. 



 
With UNTITLED. Fair only in its second year, it was impressive to see it located right at the beach on Ocean Drive. My favorite galleries included Cooper ColeBeverly’s, and Rawson Projects, as well as this sculpture by Allen Glatter.

 
If you take an even casual interest in cars, there’s plenty to see outside the fairs—this '60s Porsche 550 Spyder is a legend for being the car that James Dean famously crashed. It's practically a pop art installation in itself.
 
 
On the way into Art Basel Miami, I stopped by Printed Matter, one of the best artist edition bookstores, as well as the world’s largest non-profit dedicated to print culture. Here’s Jordan and Keith manning the booth. They had just released a new art book edition, Sender, with photographer Peter Sutherland.


It was cool to see the latest issue of Bad Day there too.


Art Basel is colossal; the whole thing is so definitive that it's difficult to describe it with any shade of personality. Pretty much every established artist in the world is on display. All of it is very institutional, and yet, here I am taking a picture of my reflection against a mirror with garbage.


Many people were attracted to this optical piece Female Stretch by Evan Penny at Sperone Westwater.


As a lot of the work on show draws attention to the spectacle of art and commodity, there’s no better example than Barbara Kruger, showing Untitled (Value) at Mary Boone.


You’ll hear people tell you that NADA Art Miami is the best art fair to see, and this is fairly true. It certainly shows the most international showcase of emerging artists and galleries. It's also a fair with a great sense of humor, which I like. Here’s an artist edition T-shirt that Andrew Kuo made on sale outside. 


Running through the show quickly, I was most taken by this piece by Margaret Lee at Jack Hanley Gallery. I love her use of dots with a ceramic dalmatian, as well as the sense of utility and playfulness. 


Another great thing about NADA is it backs out onto a hotel pool. Really great to combine these two Miami must-dos in one place!


I ran into UO's Assistant Photo Director, Julia Sadler, down by the beach!


More cars for Piston Head in the Herzog & de Meuron parking garage where a whole floor was transformed with artist-commissioned vintage cars. Here’s a classic Buick, once painted by Keith Haring. 


Later, on the final night of the weekend, Bad Day hosted a party with Petra Collins. It was great to relax, see everyone one last time, and celebrate the insanity. We're already talking about what to do for next year!


Dana’s purse was a real weekend party trick. Woof!

Jackie Linton is the Publisher of Bad Day Magazine, a biannual arts and culture magazine. You can find her writing at Alldayeveryday and you can follow her on Twitter @linton_weeks!

Happenings: Miista Shoes Pop-Up Shop at Space 15 Twenty


Attention shoe lovers! For one night only, Friday December 13th, at Space 15 Twenty in Los Angeles (1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd), UK shoe brand Miista are hosting their very own pop-up shop. Recently, Miista has collaborated with Urban Outfitters on a few pairs of totally rad shoes, like the Miista x UO Metallic Lace Up Boot, and the Miista x UO Georgie Heeled Oxford. From 6PM - 9PM this Friday, you'll be able to meet the Miista crew, plus see all of their wonderful sartorial creations. Enjoy drinks by Tequila de la Riva, and tunes by DJ Amy Pham. Plus, there's an Instagram contest you should totally enter: just post a photo of your favorite pair of Miista shoes, using the hashtag #URBANLOVESMIISTA, and you might just win a new pair of kicks from them! Maddie






Happenings: 'The Punk Singer'


Over the weekend I spontaneously decided to see a documentary called The Punk Singer at Cinefamily in Los Angeles. Originally premiering earlier this year at SXSW, The Punk Singer is a documentary that chronicles the life thus far of singer and songwriter Kathleen Hanna, who came onto the scene with Bikini Kill in the early '90s. The film features the voices and opinions of many strong feminists, including Kathleen herself, Kim Gordon, Tavi Gevinson, Carrie Brownstein, Kathi Wilcox, and so many more.

The Punk Singer
is a total must see, and you'll have no choice but to feel inspired after watching it. In it, Kathleen Hanna talks about her career with Bikini Kill, Le Tigre, her new project The Julie Ruin, and essentially why she has ever done everything she has accomplished. It's an excellent glimpse inside where and how the Riot Grrrl movement originated, which is what I loved most. If you're not in Los Angeles this week and can't catch the week long run of the film at Cinefamily, you can also view it in various other theaters across the country up until February, and you can also rent it on iTunes. Go see it and let Kathleen inspire you to let your voice be heard! Maddie


Happenings: A Benefit for The Rail Park

On Wednesday, December 4, The Walkmen, Sun Ra Arkestra, Sharon Van Etten and others will be playing a benefit show at Union Transfer, right here in Philadelphia. The show's proceeds will be going to Friends of the Rail Park, a non-profit that has been working to create a three mile park along the former Philadelphia and Reading Rail line corridor. For a look at the space they're trying to transform, check out the video below. Along with the performances, the musical portion of the night will also be MCed by Daniel Ralston of the Low Times podcast.

To purchase tickets to this event, click here.


Happenings: Globe Pop-Up Shop at Space 15 Twenty



This weekend at Space 15 Twenty (1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd), Australian clothing, skate, and surf brand Globe are opening up a pop-up shop that will open officially on November 17, and will run until November 24. Globe's shop will feature the brand's Holiday 2013 collection, plus accessories for men and women by Bing Bang NYC jewelry, bags by Summer Bummer and more.



For the pop-up shop, Globe also created an excellent short film entitled "Ice Cream", starring Stazia Lindes and Dion Agius. (Watch it below!) Stills from the short film will also be on display at the shop, bringing the retail-meets-gallery space to life. RSVP for the opening party, which will be happening on Saturday November 16, from 7PM - 10PM at Space 15 Twenty. Since the shop will only be there for a week, you won't want to miss it! Maddie



UO Exclusive: Blood Orange x AfterFest presents Making Time

Blood Orange released their highly anticipated sophomore album Cupid Deluxe yesterday. Check out our exclusive interview with frontman Dev Hynes: Blood Orange x AfterFest presents Making Time.


Making Time's Dave Pianka sat down with Hynes before our CMJ AfterFest, held high above the West Village on the 18th floor of The Standard Hotel at Le Bain. Pianka and Hynes talked about being a tourist in New York, the brilliance of Janet Jackson, and why artists should raise their voice on social media.


Cupid Deluxe is out now on Domino Records and available here on iTunes.

Delorean - "Spirit" at UO AfterFest Presents Making Time


We wish Delorean was still going to be in town to play at Fun Fun Fun and our AfterFest this weekend.  In honor of the lovely Spaniards, here's a video of their live performance from AfterFest FYF of their song "Spirit." Be sure to check the guys out when they return to the states in the new year! —Ally