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Featured Brand: Publish


Looking for the next great streetwear brand to flesh out your Fall wardrobe? Look no further than California-based brand Publish. Started in 2010, Publish focuses on creating refined, wearble streetwear for men. Michael Hyunh, the brand's founder, wanted to make a line that was "casual, with an air of sophistication," but soon discovered that people didn't fully understand the concept of his brand. Customers were thrown off by the joggers he was producing in sleek, utilitarian fabric, far different from the cotton joggers everyone was familiar with at the time.

By pairing his elasticized dress pants with classic sneakers that his customers were able to put into context, Hyunh painted a picture of the aesthetic he had in his mind, and helped people realize that the dressier pants were, in fact, just as accessible as the standard cotton joggers they were used to. Hyunh feels that his clothing is still extremely accessible for any man out there, and we can't say that we disagree. See below for our favorite shots from our Publish lookbook shoot.













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Featured Brand: Focused Space


Focused Space, a San Diego-based accessories brand, focuses on providing good-lookin' yet functional backpacks and other goodies to help organize your chaotic, electronics-filled life. We spoke to founder Bryan Grismer to find out a little bit more about how the brand got started and what his favorite and most-used Focused Space products are.



What makes your brand different from other accessory companies?

Focused Space is an exploration into the fine products of efficiency. We create a fashionable look with functional compartments to store your laptop, iPad, iPhone and electronic accessories.

What are your goals with each bag you design/make?
The goal with each design is to elevate the travel experience and how we transport and organize our technology.

Which bag of yours is the most popular?
Each style serves a different purpose depending on the length of commute. The Curriculum and The FS Commander are very popular. The brand's heritage was developed around the Silo collection, which was made of a reinterpreted woven upholstery elk fabric and fashioned to resemble a livestock feed bag. The Silo reveals unexpected constructions that stand as a salutation to America’s pastoral traditions. The Silo backpack is also the favorite backpack style of Brandon Flowers, frontman of The Killers!

Which bag is your personal favorite? What kinds of things do you find yourself putting in there daily?
The Framework convertible backpack is a personal favorite of mine. I wanted to incorporate the timeless aesthetics and convenience of a fan-opening frame combined with a multipurpose shape that solved fast pace street travel. The straps can be tucked away to carry like a tote or attached to carry like a backpack. The bag has several organizational compartments to house everything needed in a daily commute.

Can you tell us a little bit more about the sound stage you guys have set up in your home office? How did that come about?
Although our brand emphasis is focused on travel efficiency, our family grew up playing music and rehearsing in our surf/skate shop in Southern California. We wanted to create a sound stage for bands to come in and express themselves.

What kind of bands have performed there? Do you record the performances?
Up and coming indie rock, underground hip-hop and EDM type performers.

What does the future look like for Focused Space?
We will continue to create fine products of efficiency and work towards expanding into exclusive offerings for our key strategic stockists!

Shop Focused Space

Studio Visit: Outlaw Soaps

For this installment of Local Beauty, we're headed to the Bay Area for a study in soap-making with Outlaw Soaps, the Oakland-based line whose products are inspired by the attitude of some famous rule-breakers. Who says you can't be both rebellious and clean, right? We talked with co-owner Danielle Vincent about tiki bars, irreverence, and how a random stop at a Paso Robles farm stand inspired a business.

Photography by Keko Jackson.




What's the Outlaw Soaps elevator pitch?

We make exciting soaps for adventurous people. Everything we do is filled with love and laughter and the same irreverence that we feel toward life overall. We want the people who use our soaps...[have] a daily reminder of whatever it is they're passionate about, whether that's a big ol' bonfire on a camping trip or a quiet desert at sunrise. 


What’s the backstory? 

It seems kind of random, but I guess everything does from a certain angle. Russ (my husband and business partner) and I were on our honeymoon outside of Paso Robles on the 46. We stopped at a farm store and I ended up picking up some soaps, not really thinking much of it. Over the weeks that followed, I got really attached to them because they reminded me of that wonderful trip, and I thought, 'Hey, what if I could make soaps that reminded me of everything I wanted to be reminded of!' So we started studying how to make soaps. A week after we launched officially, we got a huge order for shaving kits and I quit my job. We moved to Oakland shortly after that. Many of the pictures on the vision wall are from that farmhouse store. It's really where I see us going in the next five years. 


What is "ridiculous soap"? 

We don't take ourselves too seriously and we have a lot of very funny friends. If someone comes up with a soap funny enough for me to spit coffee into my keyboard, we sometimes give it a shot. That's how Unicorn Poop came up: my friend Gretchen's daughter had the idea and I happened to have a lot of baked goods scents around (like blueberry muffin and birthday cake), so we decided to try it. And of course, it became everyone's favorite soap right away.


Why Oakland? 

Oakland was a very convenient place for us to settle. We live and work in a very, um, "safety-challenged" area in Oakland. We chose this place for very practical reasons: the rent is cheap and no one minds if we wander around looking like the cast of Breaking Bad (we wear a lot of safety gear when we're working). 

In addition to being practical, though, Oakland has really grown on us personally. There are lots of amazing places, and it's wonderful to see places like Jack London Square and downtown being revitalized. There's a lot happening in Oakland now. 



Can you share some favorite things that are happening in the area? 

I have always loved Jack London Square. Heinolds's First and Last Chance Saloon is one of the most magical places on the planet, let alone in Oakland. It's a very eccentric place, but it also feels like they kind of expected you to come in and make yourself at home. Very comforting. 

Recently, I went to an exhibition at Redux Studios and Gallery in Alameda, and it was wonderful. Alameda is just overall idyllic, but their growing art scene is significant. I feel like they're building a very unique and independent culture over there. And speaking of Alameda, Forbidden Island Tiki Bar is THE HANDS DOWN MOST AMAZING TIKI BAR EVER. Yes, it's all-caps amazing. I have quite a lot of glassware from there (they have cocktails that come with their own cup to take home). It's just wonderful. 

The place I always go when I happen to find myself in the city (that's what we Oakland people call SF) is the American Grilled Cheese restaurant. I am a huge fan of cheese and the New American has the best grilled cheese sandwiches ANYWHERE. 


Who are some of your favorite outlaws—historic or just general rule-breakers? 

Of course, I'm partial to fellow soap salesman, Soapy Smith. He had a slick swindle where he'd slip some money into the soap wrappers and then just sell off the soaps seemingly at random. People would go crazy buying the soaps hoping to get what sometimes was as much as $100 (and in 1870s money, that's a lot). Of course, Soapy didn't ever sell the winning soaps to the general public, he just sold it to his friends and got the money back at the end of the gig. 

My favorite outlaws are the ones who have a touch of humanity in their outlaw dealings... one outlaw, Tom Bell, was a surgeon and had a habit of bandaging up any victims hurt in his hold-ups. I mean, sure, he stole all their money, but that's no reason to be cruel about it. 
 

Quick: recommend one product to us (If we can only have one). 

Sage Copper Canyon soap. It will absolutely change your viewpoint for the rest of the day. 


What are you working on next? 

We just launched a lotion-to-go. It's called The Stick-Up and it's kind of like a big glue stick, but instead of glue, it's lotion. It can get through airport security, it lasts a long time, it's amazingly nourishing and soothing, and it smells incredible.


Shop Outlaw Soaps in UO Beauty!

UO Beauty: Summer Hair Repair


Now that we're deep into the summer and have been spending most of our days at the beach and pool, our hair is juuust starting to look a little worse for the wear. This is the time we whip out some of our favorite hair repair products, so our locks can get back to model status in a hurry. Read on for our current favorites below.





1. Alterna Bamboo Beach Sun Recovery Spray
Alterna's Sun Recovery Spray is a leave-in conditioner that can be applied to dry hair, which means it's incredibly easy to use and you have no excuses not to use it on your poor, over-chlorinated hair. Just spray some on before running out the door and you're good to go. (This one also happens to smell really, really good.)

2. Cocooil
Cocooil is MAGIC in a bottle. First of all, it's fine to use on your hair or your body, so it's a good buy if you like a nice two-in-one product. Secondly, if you have sensitive skin, Cocooil is a smart choice because it's an all-natural coconut-oil blend. There are no artificial fragrance or colorings are in this one, so it should be totally soothing to even the most sensitive skin.





3. Carol's Daughter Monoi Oil Sacred Strengthening Serum
Carol's Daughter Monoi Oil Sacred Strengthening Serum is a lightweight, silicone-free, hair oil that "reverses and prevents damage caused by heat-styling, color-treating and chemical straightening." The secret ingredient is its monoi oil. We love this serum because it makes our hair incredibly soft after only a couple of pumps.

4. Murray's CocoSoft Coconut Oil
Best for thick, curly hair, Murray's coconut oil is formulated a little differently from regular coconut oils. It's thicker and works as a "light-hold pomade" on top of just moisturizing, which means you don't need a lot at all. If you're looking for a lighter spray or something that's more of a straight coconut oil, then this product isn't for you!

Shop Hair Repair

Behind the Scenes: White Sands

Our newest Shape Shifter photoshoot took us to New Mexico's incredible White Sands, the largest white gypsum desert in the world. 275 square miles of crisp bright dunes set against a pristine blue sky: it's a must-see. (And a favorite photoshoot destination for its surreal, perfect light!)

Behind the scenes with the lovely Joanna Halpin, we tromped around the mountains, asked about that whole radioactivity thing and even made a new (animal) friend. 
Photographs by Devyn Galindo.

Meet our new camel friend. The production team explains, "The park ranger sent us a text and said 'We have a camel.' At first we thought it was a typo, then we looked at the white dune across from us and there was the camel in all of his glory."

His owner, George, was nice enough to let us hang out with them for part of the afternoon (read more about the White Sands camel here). 

New friend #2: the park ranger.

Who's leading who? 

Three notes on the White Sands:

1. Sabertooth Tiger footprints have been found there! 

2. The White Sands are considered an active dunefield, moving from west to east as much as 30 feet every year (the wind also leaves amazing patterns in the sand). 

3. It's also the location of the Trinity Site, where the government detonated the world's first atomic bomb on July 16, 1945. We are told it is now only "mildly radioactive."

About a Face: Joanna Halpin

We’re always curious about the daily beauty, hair, and skincare routines of the effortlessly made-up women we know. From concealer to coconut oil, "About A Face" is our insider glimpse into the makeup bags and medicine cabinets of our everyday muses.


On set of our Shape Shifter lookbook in White Sands, NM, we couldn't help but ask our model the stunning Joanna Halpin about how she stays fresh-faced. Here, she dishes on her favorite products and her secret blemish remedy. 
Photographs by Devyn Galindo.


I cleanse my face every morning and night with a brand called Cactus Skincare that I found when I was in Australia at the beginning of the year. I do that first thing in the morning. I also use one of their moisturizers. If I'm not working, I try to not wear any makeup unless I have a really bad pimple or something in which case I'll cover up with Laura Mercier's cover-up foundation. I try to not wear any makeup because my skin gets so bogged up when i'm working.

I also do a Cactus Skincare face mask sometimes — it really helps make my skin very clear. 

I don't do much to my hair other than wash and condition it most days. I will typically blow dry it and finish with a bit of leave-in conditioner. I use supermarket shampoo! Is that my secret? [Laughs.] 

Occasionally I'll put coconut oil in my hair when my hair is wet and then wash it again in the morning.

One thing i always use to get rid of spots — in England there's this stuff called Sudocrem, it's a white cream or paste. I think people even use it for nappy rash. But I put it on my spots and it works! 


Above: Off-duty face mask, via Joanna's Instagram


I try to drink lots and lots of water for my skin to try and keep it as clear and hydrated as possible.
I have started trying to drink more hot water with lemon as well as apparently that is good for your body inside and out. I also try to eat healthily and remind myself to eat lots of fruit and vegetables. I recently fell in love with avocados which are apparently good for skin and hair so have been eating them whenever possible. I also drink lots of tea: lemon and ginger is my new favorite but I love green and mint too. 

As for my beauty muses, there are so many beautiful women I could pick as my beauty icons I don't even know where to start... Maybe Brigitte Bardot and Jane Birkin.


Shop Joanna's Picks in UO Beauty:

1. Holika Holika Hello Holika Breeze Kitten Blush

2. TONYMOLY Crystal Light Highlighter

3. nyl Skincare Gentle Sugar Body Polish

4. Anastasia Tinted Brow Gel

5. ModelCo Eyebrows Designer Brow Kit

6. Herbivore Botanicals Lip Butter

7. dpHUE Hydrate Masque

8. Herbivore Botanicals Sea Mist Hair & Body Spritzer

9. Cocooil

10. Stila MAJOR Major Lash Mascara

11. Stila Color Balm Lipstick

12. Stila CC Color Correcting Stick

13. dpHUE Cool Blonde Shampoo

Happenings: On The Boat


This weekend, we'll be up in beautiful Newport, RI, hanging out on a decked-out boat with The Wild Honey Pie and some of our favorite musicians. Recording special sets on the boat all weekend long, the artists will also be making appearances on the ground at Newport Folk Fest. To get everyone pumped up for the big event, we interviewed a few of the artists involved to learn a little bit more about each of them. See you at the fest!

TALL TALL TREES




Tell us a little bit about yourself!
Well, my name is Mike Savino. I grew up in Long Island, NY, but I’ve made my home in Harlem, NY, for the past 11 years. I’ve been a musician all my life, from my humble beginnings as a heavy metal bass player in my youth, to a jazzer, to my current life as a banjo slinging troubadour.

How would you describe your sound?
Psychedelic banjo?

How do you feel about other people’s descriptions of your sound?
People throw around the terms “maverick” or “banjo wizard” which I don’t mind at all.

How long have you been playing the banjo? Do you remember the first song you tried to play?
I’ve been playing the banjo for almost 20 years (yikes), though at first it was a hobby as I was more serious about becoming a jazz bassist. On the side I was studying Earl Scruggs and Pete Seeger, learning to play those old-time songs like “Cripple Creek” and “Foggy Mountain Breakdown."

A show is a success when everyone leaves feeling elated and mystified.

The best part about touring is seeing old friends and making new ones.

Favorite memory from 2014?

The year is half over and I feel like I’ve already done so much. I just returned from a tour of Japan for the second time. That was pretty amazing.

Have you attended Newport Folk Fest as a concertgoer? If so, any favorite memories?
I haven’t. This will be my first time!

Any NPFF moments/sets through the years that particularly stand out to you?
I’m guessing that this year will stand out. :)

Who are you looking forward to seeing at the festival?
So much! I’m excited to reunite with my friends Lucius and Valerie June who will also be playing. I’m a huge fan of Trampled by Turtles whom I’ve never gotten to see. Robert Hunter has always been a hero of mine. I’m excited to see Jack White, Jeff Tweedy, Conor Oberst, Deer Tick... there’s so many. I’m going to be very busy.

What do you like to do when you’re not playing music?
Unfortunately, when I’m not playing music, I’m sending emails. Haha. One day I’m going to get me a little cabin in the woods and just sit there listening to the birds, drawing in my sketchbook, and drinking coffee.

Who are you currently listening to?
At the moment I’m listening to Sean Lennon’s new band GOASTT, Floating Action, and the tracks from my upcoming EP - getting them ready for release. I’ve heard those, WAY too many times.


THAO AND THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN



Tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got started as a musician.
I'm Thao. I grew up in Virginia and taught myself to play guitar and other stringed instruments and the first song I ever wrote was for a book project on Lord of the Flies in eighth grade. Still some of my best work.

How would you describe your sound?
Old country and blues and R&B influenced loose and energetic rock and roll music with melancholic lyrics.

How has your upbringing shaped your music?
I think growing up in an immigrant household as a first-generation American kid raised by a very hardworking single mom infused me with a social consciousness and empathy and I hope that is evident in my music.

What would you most like for people to take away from your music?
Empathy and energy.

Who inspires you musically? (Singers/songwriters/etc.)
Dolly Parton, A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Lucinda Williams, Bill Callahan, Outkast, Elvis Perkins, Songs Ohia, John Prine, older street musicians, our bassist Adam Thompson, my dear friend Merrill Garbus of Tune-Yards, writers Joan Didion, Grace Paley, Dennis Johnson, and all the fantastic people with whom I've had the pleasure of collaborating.

You’ve collaborated with a lot of amazing artists. Who would you like to collab with in the future?
I would love to collaborate with brass musicians in New Orleans and genius musician kids and comedic actors.

A show is a success when you feel like you and the crowd were in it together and either side gave just as much as the other.

The best part about touring is seeing old friends you'd otherwise never get to see, eating amazing food you'd otherwise never get to eat.

Who are you currently listening to?
The Byrds, En Vogue, Mavis Staples.

What does the future hold for you?
Writing our next record and then recording it and then releasing it and then touring it. Immediate future holds eating kale I bought at the farmer's market.


DEATH VESSEL



Hi Joel! Tell us a little bit about yourself.
I grew up in a small coastal town in Maine. Before Death Vessel, I formed the band String Builder with my brother, Alec. I first started making music in Rhode Island in 1997.

How would you describe your sound?
A friend once described Death Vessel's sound as "melancholy candyland."

A show is a success when when all is a wow.

The best part about touring is is feeling welcome in a new and distant place. Additionally, I've always liked the routine that a well-planned itinerary provides.

What do you love about RI?
The official state rock of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations is the Cumberlandite. It's exclusive to RI. And it's magnetic.

Where are your favorite places to hang out in RI?
I spend most of my time on the west side of Providence. Parker Woodlands is great for shady hikes. I recently had the opportunity to visit Clingstone. It's a lone house built on a tiny rocky island in Narragansett Bay near Jamestown. It's quite a sight.

Have you attended Newport Folk Fest as a concertgoer? If so, any favorite memories?
Yes, last year. Michael Hurley's performances in the Harbor Tent (with Black Prairie as his backing band) and in the Family Tent were festival highlights.

Any NPFF moments/sets through the years that particularly stand out to you?
I'm easily enthralled by the video clip of Blue Ridge Mountain Dancers with Pete Seeger (1964?) that's circulating online.

Who are you currently listening to?
I've been on a Francois Rabbath kick lately.

Shop Joel's vinyl picks

On The Boat Performers
Tall Tall Trees
Death Vessel
Thao & The Get Down Stay Down
Shakey Graves
Lucius

RSVP for the On The Boat experience here! Spaces are extremely limited. Winners will be randomly chosen starting July 24. For more info, click here.

Brands We Love: Cleobella


We're always keeping an eye out for the next best bag, and this summer the artfully designed handbags and totes from Cleobella have caught our eye. Printed in eye-catching colors and fabrics and inspired by the travel stories of founder Angela O'Brien, the bags are basically made for summer. (Does that fringed one not just scream "sunshine" to you?) Initially started by O'Brien after a particularly inspiring trip to Bali in 2008, each piece continues to be made by hand, making each bag unique in its own way. All of the materials used are sourced locally in Bali and include limited edition textiles, recycled metals and quality leather.



The brand was first inspired by Angela and her husband Jim's love of surfing and travel, and that free-spirited quality is still a big part of the bags you see today. (Which is a big part of why we think that these bags are perfect for weekend getaways or quick festival jaunts.) Now grab one of these bags and go have an adventure of your own.



Shop Cleobella

Brands We Love: Antonym

We're excited to welcome Antonym into the UO Beauty lineup, a mineral-based and eco-friendly line founded by the French makeup artist Valerie Giraud and designed in subtly-bold shades that strike that perfect, just-made-up-enough balance. And with a namesake that emphasizes moving away from homogeneity and moving toward people who think outside of the box: it's a movement we can get behind. 

We had fun playing around with all the amazing Antonym products, and asking the ladies behind the brand to share what all is in their summer makeup bags.


What sets Antonym apart from other natural beauty lines?

Antonym was founded on strong performance. We set out to create a line of products that uses gentle natural ingredients but still performs as a premium line should. For us this means strong pigments in color and silky textures.

 

What products are in your makeup bag for summer?

This summer, it is vitamin E oil, the Antonym Medium Foundation, The Peach Blush and the Koral Lipstick. It’s a very summery look, with orange hues. The mascara also never leaves my bag.


 

What's in the Antonym starter kit? 

Mascara, lipstick pencil and blush 


 

What products do you recommend for makeup removal?

I use the Miscellar Cleansing Water from Nuxe or the Melting Cleansing Gel from Nuxe, and follow both with gentle toning lotion. They are very gentle on the skin yet remove makeup perfectly.


Who are some of your beauty muses?

Brigitte Bardot and Audrey Hepburn. Both strong, beautiful women. 

  

Can you share any secret-weapon makeup tips?

I have two tips, especially since Antonym products are gentle on the skin:

1. If you use the eyeliner with a small angled brush you can apply a lighter and more define line for daytime.

2. You can use the baked blush as eye shadow and also on the lips with lip conditioner.


Shop Antonym in UO Beauty

UO x Lonely Planet: Get Out There Instagram Contest

Urban Outfitters and Lonely Planet are challenging all adventure seekers and travelers to Instagram their most epic travel photo for a chance to win an 11-day trip for two through Mexico, Belize and Guatemala. Document your trip and you could be featured on our site. Get out there and go explore!





How to Enter:
1. Download the Urban Outfitters App
2. Sign up for "Urban On" and link your Instagram account to the App
3. Instagram your most epic travel photo with the hashtag #UOxLP in the photo caption



While you're waiting to see who wins, you can flip through Lonely Planet's book, 1000 Ultimate Experiences, to start planning your next big adventure!

Brands We Love: Le Specs


If you’re always on the hunt for the next best shades, then your search may have finally come to an end. (We know, we’re just as surprised. We also thought finding the perfect pair of sunglasses was a never-ending quest.) 


Enter Le Specs sunglasses. As a company that launched in the mid-‘80s, Le Specs really knows their stuff when it comes to sunglasses. The brand has had their fair share of collaborations over the years, the most recent one being with renowned pop culture illustrators Craig and Karl. The shapes the duo came up with are exaggerated and colorful, very similar to the graphic design work they've been working on together ever since college.



While Le Specs continuously makes sure to stay on top of the current trends, their sunglasses are far from “trendy.” Their “classic shapes injected with sleek, modern attitude” ensure that Le Specs sunglasses will be as easy to wear now as they will be ten years from now. Plus, with people like Beyoncé and Solange Knowles, Cara Delevingne, and Rihanna rocking the brand, you know they must be doing something right. (And if wearing these takes us one step closer to looking like Beyoncé, then we're totally on board.) On top of all that, the packaging is just as cute as the sunglasses themselves.





UO DIY: Scrapbooking


After visiting Tulum recently to shoot our newest lookbook, we had so many new Instax photos that we didn't know what to do with all of them. Rather than hang them up, we decided to start a scrapbook/journal hybrid for them, so we could keep all our pics in one spot and also write down some of our favorite memories. Instagram is good but when it comes to keeping track of a bunch of photos, sometimes it's best to go back to a good ol' fashioned notebook. Read on to see what we did!





Organize
If you, like us, take a boatload of photos, you'll want to sit down before scrapbooking to decide which pics you want to include and which pics you're going to shove in a box somewhere. It's also nice to be able to look at everything in front of you before you start working, just so you can make sure you have everything you need. Above were our basic supplies for this project. The notebook we're using to start out is this super fun (and bright!) unruled Leuchtturm journal.

Keep It Simple
It's easy to want to throw five pictures on each page with 30 different artistic touches, but it usually (not all the time!) looks better when the clutter is kept to a minimum. (But if you've figured out how to make clutter look amazing, give us a call, because we love glitter and stickers.)





Washi Tape
We love washi tape for scrapbooking because 1) it's adorable and 2) it's the easiest way to adhere pictures. You don't even have to worry about doing the roll of tape on the back because it looks perfect taped right on the front. We're also pretty lazy when it comes to crafting, so it's nice to have something that's so versatile and easy to use.

Stamps
Obviously stamps are a great way to add some excitement onto your scrapbook pages. You can get literally anything on a stamp these days, which is perfect for those of us less artistically inclined. Can't draw a cat? Stamp it! Boom. Done.





Mixed Media
We liked the idea of mixing in some souvenirs and cards we found, just to round out the whole scrapbook a little bit better. For some of our backgrounds, we bought printed paper in Mexico that we then cut out and taped into the book to give our pages a more colorful background. A pack of beachy playing cards also looked nice mixed in with everything, so we stuck them in there, too.

Stickers
Stickers are THE BEST. You can put them on pictures, use them to stick pictures to the page, and decorate the page with them. It's super easy to go overboard with them. (We maybe went a little overboard. It's fine.) But hey, if you love stickers, there are some giant books of them out there that will let you sticker to your heart's content.





Shop Travel Journal Essentials

Brands We Love: adidas

After a few seasons out of production, the adidas Stan Smith Sneaker is back. In classic white leather, it’s our summer sneaker of choice. Even if you’re unfamiliar with sneakers and the overarching culture of adidas as a brand (you know, aside from knowing that those adidas Superstar sneaks were the shoe to have in middle school), chances are you’ve heard of the Stan Smith adidas tennis sneaker.





While the shoe was created in the late ‘60s under the name "Haillot," attaching tennis pro Stan Smith’s image to the simple shoe is what turned the design into a fashion mainstay. When Smith was brought on to promote the shoe in the early '70s, the shoe was still being touted as an athletic sneaker. Now, nearly fifty years later, the shoe is no longer seen as athletic attire but rather as a fashion statement. After halting production on the shoe in 2012, adidas is relaunching the iconic sneaker this year, much to the joy of sneakerheads everywhere, and we're excited to get our hands on some of these for summer. #STANSMITH!



Shop adidas Stan Smith

About a Place: A UO Guide to Tulum


With its crystal clear water, pristine white sand beaches, and travel culture heavy on hammock lounging and streetside fish taco eating, truly: Life is sweet in Tulum. To kick off a summer of exploring, here's our guide to and souvenirs from a quick escape to the Riviera Maya. 

POSTCARDS FROM CENOTE AZUL:







Historically believed to be sacred portals to the underworld, cenotes are pools formed by the collapsing of limestone caves. There are literally thousands along the Yucatan—our choice was Cenote Azul, a quiet freshwater lagoon with a cliff for jumping into the water. 

Opting for analog memories, we snapped pictures with a Instax Mini 8, Fujifilm's portable instant camera.

A DAY-IN-THE-LIFE:


Tulum beverage-of-choice: Mojitos made from freshly-crushed sugarcane juice, lime, and extra mint, served to you from a converted VW Beetle at the Batey Mojito and Guarapo Bar.


For a quick taco, we recommend Mateo's, complete with a row of empty hammocks on their giant deck.



Acapulco chairs on the beach, designed from traditional Mayan hammock-weaving techniques.



Laid-back beach vibes.



How the locals do coconut water: Find a young coconut, whip out a machete (!), cut off the top, scrape the sides, and stick a straw into the top.  



Bikes at the compound, with baskets handy for trekking around town.

OUR PICKS:

For afternoon adventures: 
Snorkeling on the reef in front of the Maya Ruins
The ruins at Coba—rent a bicycle and get lost in the jungle
Exploring nature at the Sian Ka'an biosphere
The perfumery at Coqui Coqui

For a fancy night out: Hartwood

For a quick post-beach taco: Mateo's

For lodging: Zazil-Kin, Papaya Playa, Ahau, S&S Hip Hotel 

For nightlife: Gitano Bar, Ziggy Beach, Adelita, El Curandero 


We documented our trip through a travel scrapbook—read more here on our DIY tutorial.

UO Music: Raury


Raury is an 18-year-old performer from Atlanta, GA, and even though he just graduated from high school last month, he'll soon be supporting Outkast (along with Childish Gambino and Kid Cudi) at their sold out #ATLast festival this September. We've been hearing the buzz about Raury for some time now, so this Friday, June 27, Raury will be performing at our Atlanta, GA location. We caught him on the phone last month right before his graduation to find out a little bit more about what he plans to do this summer and just how he's going to take over Atlanta. Katie



Hi Raury! Thanks for talking to us.
No problem. Nice to meet you, Katie.

Nice to meet you too. How’s everything going?
I’m graduating today!

Oh, today?!
Yeah, I have to be at the center around 4pm.

Oh my god, well thanks for doing this interview. And congratulations on graduating!
Yeah, for sure. It feels so good to be free.

Do you have any plans for the summer yet?
Oh, yeah. To take over Atlanta. [Laughs] Those are my plans.

So you must be pretty happy to be done with school now.
Yeah, I guess a lot of people are pretty excited to be done, like [excited voice], “I’m graduating, I’m graduating!” But I’m just so ready to get it over with and go away. I don’t feel that excitement. Maybe it’ll hit me when I’m in there, but right now I’m just like, “Get me out of here!”

Are you planning to move out of Atlanta or do you want to stick around?
I have unfinished business here. There’s a lot to be done before I can just up and leave. I’d like to be here and then leave from time to time, like business trips or working with other people. I feel like I need to take over the city before I leave it. [Laughs]

We saw online that you’ve been going on an “Anti-Tour” and played outside a Childish Gambino show recently.
Yeah, yeah.

Do you have plans to keep doing that?
Okay, I’m going to tell you a secret but you can’t tell anybody. I can’t even say it too loud because my mom’s in the other room and she doesn’t know either. But you know how I’m graduating today? Guess what’s about to happen? [Laughs] A lot of kids like the song and I didn’t perform at the talent show, so they’re pissed off at me. They’re about to get their performance. [Laughs]

Have you ever gotten in real trouble for one of those performances?
Nah, I’m too fast to get in trouble. [Laughs]

Do you ever play venues in Atlanta?
Actually, my first "real" show at a venue is going to be June 10th.


Footage from Raury's first "real" live show, Raurfest, June 2014

When does your EP Indigo Child finally come out?
I'm thinking late summer. Be on the lookout for it August through September!

Do most people find you through the internet or do you have a good fanbase in Atlanta that's spreading your stuff?
Well, in my high school I've always been really well-known for doing music. Like I started a music club and directed the talent show so I have a lot of people that believe in me and the things I do. For the past two years my management and I have just been building up one hell of a network. Getting to know the right people and starting the right relationships, you know? Now that it's time for me to release something and they know what the music is, they really champion it. They really love the music.

When did you start getting super serious with your music?
I knew that music was what I wanted to do with the rest of my life when I was 14. I was a young kid and was like, "What can I do to get rich and get the girls?" [Laughs] I've always been doing things, I've always been musically inclined. And I tried other things, like I ran track and football, but at the end of the day I wrote my first song when I was 3, looking up to Michael Jackson and all that, so by the time I was 14 I quit playing football and really tried figuring out every way I could get involved musically with the school. Just putting myself out there. Throughout that, I just got to meet the right people and get into a position where I'm doing the things I'm doing now.

Who have you been listening to lately?
I've been listening to PARTYNEXTDOOR. Also digging deeper into some older stuff lately. I've been retrograding with my music. Like Stevie Wonder and Prince. I just downloaded Nirvana's Nevermind album. I'm always listening to Kid Cudi, I'm never not listening to Kid Cudi. I'm never not listening to Justin Vernon.

What are you excited for this year?
To see how the world reacts to the Indigo Child project. I feel like it's not just gonna be a collection of music. It's not just an EP or a mixtape or anything like that. It's a movement and a project within itself. The videos and interviews, everything down to the shows I do, they inspire this new wave in music. There's a lot of cool, different types of kids in my city, not to mention the rest of the world, that are young and overlooked. Throughout this project it'll just bring awareness to these young, advanced kids of the internet age. Kinda wake the world up about that.



See Raury perform live on June 27 at our Atlanta store (1061 Ponce DeLeon Ave. NE)!

UO Exclusive: Robyn and Royksopp "Do It Again"


It's no secret that over here at UO we love all things vinyl. Now available to pre-order only at UO is the new record from electronic pop trio Robyn & Röyksopp called Do It Again. But there's more to it! This UO-exclusive is made of crisp, white vinyl, and will look fabulous in your collection. Also, how cool is the cover art? Totally loving the throwback to an old CD label across the front.

The album features five massive tracks from the trio that are sure to be your new summer favorites. Each track is a perfect combo of European electronic music mixed with Robyn's superb vocals. Robyn, a futuristic pop-princess in her own right, spoke to Billboard Magazine about the new record saying, "It was an outlet for not having to live up to anything but my own expectations." That's the spirit, right? Do It Again opens with the slower, melodic "Monument" and then ramps the energy right back up with the title track. Do It Again was created, produced, and recorded by all three members from scratch.

Robyn & Röyksopp are on tour this summer, will you be catching them? Pre-order the record here. Maddie

UO Live: Connan Mockasin


The inaugural video in our UO Live series, Connan Mockasin performs a live and unplugged version of “I Wanna Roll With You,” off Caramel, his second full-length album. We caught up with him and his band behind the scenes.



You can thank Connan Mockasin’s mom for bringing his music into the world. The New Zealand-born artist was living with his parents when he recorded his first solo record, Forever Dolphin Love, at home.

“I’ve done two records on my own,” he says. “The first record, I was pretty disheartened by the industry—still am in some ways—but the point is, I went back home to stay with my parents and I wasn’t really doing anything. And then my mum was telling me that I should make a record. And I was like, ‘No, no.’ Because I was kind of brainwashed into thinking you needed a producer, an engineer, a proper studio—da, da, da. And then mum was going, ‘No you don’t, you’ve got some equipment back home.’ So I just made a record on my own there, not thinking that it would ever be heard. And then it somehow got released and I started having to play shows all of a sudden and it just happened like that.”

The record “somehow got released” via influential British DJ and producer Erol Alkan, and brought Mockasin’s soulful, experimental grooves to the attention of Charlotte Gainsbourg, with whom he has collaborated and played backup band for, and Radiohead, who he supported on tour in 2012. 

Caramel, released in November last year is, as its name suggests, Mockasin’s most deliciously slow-dance-ready yet, and sees him touring with a new line-up—a motley crew of musicians he picked-up from New York to London: Drummer Matt Eccles, bassist Nick Harsant, guitarist (and occasional bongo player) Rory McCarthy and keyboardist Sofia Karchi. (Fun fact: Mockasin met keyboardist-cum-manager Sofia on the Eurostar from Paris.)



Hi everyone! Connan, can you tell us about the song you chose to perform for the first in our UO Live video series?
Connan: I recorded it in Tokyo in a hotel room. It was the one song that I’d written before I made the record and it had a caramel feel for me.

How would you describe your outfit today? [Mockasin is wearing pale silk Chinese pajamas, an embroidered vest and black nurse’s clogs accessorized with a fencing sword he found on-set].
Connan: Peter Pan!

Where are you all based? 
Connan: I’m not based anywhere at the moment, myself. 
Nick: I’m in London, always in London. 
Matt: New York
Sofia: I don’t have a place anywhere. 
Rory: Paris  

How did you all get together? 
Nick: That’s a long one… 
Connan: Matt and I met in London. Then I met Nick the day we played together. We met Sofia on a train and I helped with her luggage. I thought she was rude. 
Sofia: I was just thinking, this poor man seems very tired, and he was already carrying so much, I didn’t think it was fair to ask for his help. 
Connan: So we sit down and Sofia was one up from me but across the aisle and we sat chatting. 
Rory: I met all of the other guys in Manchester at The Deaf Institute. I came to see Connan; I had seen him a few times and he was a friend of a friend. He asked me to play bongos, which as a guitar player was a funny thing to be asked, but I ended up playing more bongos than guitar! 
Matt: Rory just got up for an encore and never left!

What did you do for a living before you started playing music? 
Connan: My last proper job was a gardener. 
Rory: I as making fake teeth, which is ironic because I’m missing a tooth and I don’t have the tool here to make a replacement. 
Band: How do you make a fake tooth? 
Rory: I can go into it right now! It takes a lot of casts and semi-precious metals and all kinds of stuff...

So, how do you describe your sound? 
Rory: “Sensitive rock”
Matt: "Café Soliel"
Nick: "Sleaze Rock"
Connan: "Wonka Dust"

You get pretty creative describing your sound. What about other people's descriptions? What do you make of it?
Rory: The weirdest one for me when you got called Auzzie-psych. 
Sofia: Yeah, that was just wrong! 
Rory: It’s fine but it’s wrong. 
Nick: "Weirdo" always creeps up, which is strange. Aussie-weird. Psych-weirdo.
Connan: Or “Wellington Jazz Pianist”—that’s another funny one. I can’t play piano and I’m not from Wellington, either. I think it was on Wikipedia for a while, that’s why. It’s really hard to get things off Wikipedia. A lot of people run their interviews off Wikipedia and a lot of it’s wrong. So I wrote to them and said, “This is actually me and this is not true, can I take it off?” And then I got kicked off for trying to change it.

Your performances are very special: They’re atmospheric, wonderful and such an experience. How do you approach it as a band? 
Matt: We try to make it different as much as we can.
Connan: It would be pretty maddeningly boring to do the same thing every night. Last night at the Bowery Ballroom we had a huge band. We had probably 20 people on stage!



Within your music, do you feel like there is a commonality in your friendship? 
Sofia: Fashion. I think that’s our common thing. 
Connan: We enjoy hanging out together. I don’t know if it’s necessarily about music or enjoying the same music, but we do. Because you are doing the same thing a lot of the time: Going to the venue, setting up, playing, and going away. I think a lot of bands get disheartened and it starts affecting them. 
Sofia: I think we just love each other so much and we genuinely really care about each other so much in our lives, and we are friends. It’s true. These guys are the most important guys in my life and every show is just about us having fun with the crowd and enjoying our job. It changes every time depending on our mood, but I think it’s love. 

It must to be great to be so close and tour together. Are there any special moments on tour that you can share? 
Matt: Tunisia was pretty cool. 
Connan: [Laughs] 
Matt: Connan rode a camel to the stage. 
Nick: With a Go-Pro 
Connan: Which I had to hold! The camel would go down and up really quick and I was trying to hold on tight. 
Matt: It took a long time to get to the stage as well. [Laughs]
Connan: Am I allowed to swear on this?

Yes!
Connan: When we were in Tunisia, I had this moment—we were in a really nice hotel. That’s the thing, usually when you’re on tour you don’t get time to hang out on your own very often, but it was nice to have a day off and just spend it by myself in the hotel. I ordered a coffee and I rolled myself a cigarette and the sun was going down and I was standing on the balcony and there were camels walking along the beach. And I [dramatically mimics smoking a cigarette], I had my coffee and I was just like, 'Fuck yeah!' I spoke out loud to myself—‘Fuck yeah!’ I scared myself! [Laughs]. You know when you talk to yourself when you’ve been on your own all day? It was aggressive!

In general, what has touring been like? 
Matt: It’s nice to play shows in America now. It’s always nice to go to new places and see how it goes. 
Nick: People know the lyrics to songs. They’ve started to sing along, which didn’t happen before—our lyrics are pretty obscure. It’s pretty funny to see people sing what they think they’re hearing. 
Sofia: I don’t know the lyrics! 
Matt: Even we don’t and we’re all singing as well. 
Connan: Even I don’t. [Band laughs]

What do you like to do when you’re not making music? What can you do when you're not touring that you can't on the road?
Connan: I watch a lot of surfing on the Internet and I love pasta.
Sofia: [Go on] dates. I feel like I've gone on more dates since I’m I the band so I’m happy about that. I think it’s a good thing, no? 
Matt: Depends on the date really! 
Sofia: Yep, it depends on the date. I had two dates in New York since I’ve been here! One good, one just okay. 
Connan: They’re going to know who they are now. 
Matt: Keep ‘em guessing!

Check out Connan’s full-length album, Caramel, out now on Mexican Summer Records.

Meet The Designer: Marisa Haskell


California-based jewelry designer Marisa Haskell has been creating handmade jewelery ever since she was young, and after being fans of her line for ages, we're happy to announce our exclusive Marisa Haskell x UO collaboration is now available online. We chatted with Marisa about how she chose the pieces for her UO collaboration, how California influenced her growing up and the challenges she's faced as an artist.
Photographs by Emily Dulla





Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background. How did growing up in California influence the rest of your life?

I grew up in the Santa Barbara mountains in a house my parents built over the course of about 10 years. My parents were antique dealers and great designers and our house was always full of eclectic art, jewelry and textiles. We lived far enough out from town that you would hike to your friend's houses, or find creative ways to entertain yourself. Being outside, surfing, making things was a big part of my youth. It helps breathe a bit of independence into you that can be hard to shake. Everyday I try to get outside and create a little bit of this kind of environment in my life.

When & how did you first become interested in working with leather and jewelry making?
When I was about 15 I was helping my grandma and we came across some beautiful deer hides that she had tanned years back. She gave me the hides as well as some tools and taught me a bit about basic leather work. I began to realize the satisfaction of using thing that you had handmade. Working with leather was great because it provides many limitations- it was about taking the time, observing the material and keeping it simple, which is important in all design. I started making jewelry with scraps left behind and overtime my interest evolved and I found myself incorporating other materials and refining my aesthetic.



You spent some time living and working in Mexico; How did that shape your life and your career path?
Living in Mexico happened somewhat unintentionally. I had just finished college and as much as I wanted to, I didn't have a set plan yet, so I took a trip down there. I got a job and then a month long trip turned into 3 months, then 6, then a little over a year. I worked, surfed and made things. There was a lot of space for creativity and I didn't many of the distractions and anxieties I would have had back home. I learned how to be happy through simplifying my life. These days I work a ton and tend to take on as much as I can handle and so it is great to try to remember the value of just cutting back sometimes, simplifying, and make space for what you love most.

Who is the customer you design for? Do you have a dream customer?
Having my store in Oakland, CA has been an amazing experience because I get to meet so many awesome people and see them wearing the pieces. Oakland is a really diverse place, so you get the full spectrum of people shopping the line which has been rewarding to see. Dream customer? I had Linda Evangelista (who has been on the cover of Vogue more times then one can count) purchase some pieces from me the first month I started out. I figured that if someone who has been in the industry for so long liked it, then maybe this could work.







Can you tell us about your design process? How does a single piece go from an idea in your head to a finished product?
When I go to design a new collection I begin with drawings and then I start putting materials together and experimenting. Properly using materials is crucial to me - Find what is unique about leather and show that. Bring out what is different about brass. I make tons of samples and start pulling things together and seeing how the scale is working, the weight, the balance. Making all of my samples is critical to my process; working, adapting, and changing them as needed. Some styles come together in a few hours and other times I will spend days and get nothing. I know a piece is done when I want to take off whatever I have on and wear that one instead.

What have been your proudest moments and your biggest challenges?
The biggest challenge was getting over the intimidation of going into this industry. I thought there was some magic formula for making it happen. Turns out its mostly about being willing to work really hard, do things you don't think you can pull off, and having your eyes peeled for lucky breaks. As far as running my business goes- creating a system where we can make everything for my line by hand in our studio in Oakland has also been a huge challenge. It feels good though- building your team, making it by hand and feeling proud of the camaraderie you create.

Can you tell us about your UO collab?
Working with UO, we wanted to design great statement pieces for a wide audience. I feel like the type of person that shops at Urban Outfitters is so diverse that I really wanted the styles to be bold but wearable by someone of a variety of fashion leanings. We kept the pieces very true to my line and we made them easy to wear for a wide audience.

Behind The Scenes: Blood Orange Video

The next in our UO Music Video Series, Gia Coppola teams up with Dev Hynes to direct Blood Orange's "You're Not Good Enough." The video follows the release of Palo Alto, also directed by Coppola and featuring a dreamy soundtrack full of tracks by the musician. Here, we follow Dev, Gia, and the rest of the crew behind the scenes for a closer look at the making of "You're Not Good Enough."
Photography by Sam Monkarsh











The UO Music Video Series is our innovative approach to new music, pairing emerging artists with talented directors to make artful music videos. Since 2010, we've produced over a dozen music videos in collaboration with our favorite artists, labels, and directors, who retain full creative control over their projects.

Over the past few years, we've supported a wonderfully curated selection of artists and musicians, including Washed Out, Tame Impala, The Walkmen, Black Lips, The War on Drugs, Beach Fossils, Frankie Rose, Liars, and many more. The ongoing music video sponsorship program continues with Blood Orange's "You're Not Good Enough," the eighteenth in the UO Music Video Series.

To celebrate the new music video release, stop by our new Herald Square store on Thursday, June 12 from 2-3pm, where director Gia Coppola and Blood Orange's Dev Hynes will join us for a For The Record appearance and vinyl signing.











Shop Palo Alto Soundtrack

I'm With The Band: Tennis

While on their recent tour with Haim, we sat down to chat with Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley, the husband and wife duo who make up the laid-back band Tennis, and we're now even more in love with them. They made us laugh, taught us a secret hair trick, and left us extremely excited to hear their upcoming fall album. Interview by Katie Gregory



Hey guys! What was it like playing with Haim?
A: It's definitely the biggest indoor crowd we’ve ever played to. We’ve played bigger ones at festivals, but it feels different all sprawled out across a field. There’s more atmosphere in here.

You guys recently played a headline show in Williamsburg, right?
A: We did, it was so great, but so different from the Haim shows. We’ve done lots of opening shows before but never one for an indie band that’s in the middle of becoming like, mainstream and full-blown. You know what I mean? It’s one thing to open for The Shins or The National but these girls have lines around the block with adoring, young fans waiting to get in. They crowd around the bus all night waiting to get a glimpse. I know that that exists, I’ve just never been on a tour where I’ve seen it. With the bigger bands, it’s different.

And it’s like a younger crowd mostly?
A: Yeah, totally! I felt compelled to give a girl power speech. This is the first time I’m not playing to a crowd of young professionals or people in college. It’s really a lot of younger girls and I want to be like “You should be doing this too!”

You guys just started touring again recently, right?
A: We started touring in the last five months after taking more than a year off to do some writing. It was crazy getting back into the swing of things and a little overwhelming. But now that we’re into it, it’s really fun and there’s always new things. We’re rising to the occasion and we have new material that we specifically wrote that would be the best live. Some songs live just don’t connect the same way, so we specifically wrote songs that would translate well.

Have people been responding well to that?
A: Yeah, which has been crazy!
P: In the past, people would be like, [sarcastically] “Alright, that was great!”
A: It’s hard for people in the live setting, if they’ve never heard it even once, to process it, but these new ones are working regardless. Maybe there’s just something more visceral that we’re trying to tap into.

Do you guys have a favorite song from the new EP [Small Sound]?
A: From the new one my favorite song is "Mean Streets" because it’s the sassiest. [laughs]
P: I think "Timothy" might be the most fun for me to play.



I like that you guys have an actual favorite and didn’t tell me that they’re all your favorites.
A: Oh, totally. They’re NOT all my favorites. [laughs] There are songs I hope to never play. I’m just like “Oh my god, why is that in the world?” I don’t know any band that doesn’t regret at least one song. [laughs]

Are you guys playing any festivals coming up?
A: Not this year, we’re hoping to catch them next time around. Our newest album will hopefully be coming out in the fall, so we’ll just hop on the bandwagon a year from now.
P: We’ll take a breather because when it does come out, that will be our life for like a year, just touring. Never getting to see home. That’s just how music works now.

Do you guys have any favorite albums that you like to play in the summer?
P: That’s a good question. Beach Boys IS summer, but we can’t say that because it’s too cliché. Everyone loves the Beach Boys.
A: But it’s fully true. We just listened to them today. You never get over it.
P: I listen to a lot of S.E. Rogie in the summer. It’s this like, island-y sound, really happy and pleasant. It’s like surf-y island music.
A: It’s really washed out and dreamy. The whole band was recorded with one mic in the studio. You hear the naturalness in it and it’s really beautiful.
P: Yeah, it makes you feel good. What’s a newer band? We like Mac DeMarco. And The Shilohs, have you heard of them? They’re so good. They’re Canadian and their album just came out. We’re going to plug the shit out of that. I hope that people connect with their music because they’re fucking great people, and they really deserve it. There’s a song called “Sisters of Blue” which is one of the best songs I’ve heard in the last five or six years.



Are you guys looking forward to anything this summer?
P: Releasing the album. [laughs] I think we’ll just be able to breathe a bit better when we can have it exist in the world. We’ve spent a year and a half writing it and we put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into it. We moved to Nashville for some reason...
A: Well, not for SOME reason.
P: We tried to go down there to write the album, but then we ended up feeling like we weren’t doing as much as we could down there.
A: We felt like lost puppies. This last year was a lot of false starts. Having the album ready to go is like having finals being over, like thank god. I’m gonna go out dancing. I’m gonna do all the things I did not do because I was saving my voice. [laughs]

So you guys moved out of Nashville?
A: Yeah, we moved back to Denver. We were in Nashville for almost a year and it was really, really glorious at first and then we just realized we took a lot of things for granted, mostly our friends. We got really lonely and named all of the bunny rabbits that lived in the bush in our front yard. We turned into an 80-year-old couple. I put up bird feeders. We named the birds and the rabbits and we’d just sit there looking out the window all day and I’d be like, “Oh look, Hazel and Basil are out.” Then one day we were just like… we are insane. We need to get the hell out of here.

But now the album is 100% done?
A: It’s done! It’s finally mixed and mastered. We’re just sorting out artwork and release date and then it will be set and ready to go.

One last question: do you have any hair tips, Alaina? Because we love your hair.
A: Thank you! I have been killing myself trying to figure out how to make curly hair cool and not poodle-ish. I decided that the ‘70s were the best for curls and I figured out that, unfortunately, it takes a lot of time. I get a curling iron that’s the same width as my own curls and go through my whole head, and then I just take my hands and shred it all apart. And then I leave it for like… ten days. This is like day five right now! I use Oscar Blandi dry shampoo. I read an interview with Annie Clark, St. Vincent, and she said 11 day old hair is the best hair and I was like WHAT? I am missing out! So that’s the trick. [laughs]

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