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UO DIY: Scrapbooking


After visiting Tulum recently to shoot our newest lookbook, we had so many new Instax photos that we didn't know what to do with all of them. Rather than hang them up, we decided to start a scrapbook/journal hybrid for them, so we could keep all our pics in one spot and also write down some of our favorite memories. Instagram is good but when it comes to keeping track of a bunch of photos, sometimes it's best to go back to a good ol' fashioned notebook. Read on to see what we did!





Organize
If you, like us, take a boatload of photos, you'll want to sit down before scrapbooking to decide which pics you want to include and which pics you're going to shove in a box somewhere. It's also nice to be able to look at everything in front of you before you start working, just so you can make sure you have everything you need. Above were our basic supplies for this project. The notebook we're using to start out is this super fun (and bright!) unruled Leuchtturm journal.

Keep It Simple
It's easy to want to throw five pictures on each page with 30 different artistic touches, but it usually (not all the time!) looks better when the clutter is kept to a minimum. (But if you've figured out how to make clutter look amazing, give us a call, because we love glitter and stickers.)





Washi Tape
We love washi tape for scrapbooking because 1) it's adorable and 2) it's the easiest way to adhere pictures. You don't even have to worry about doing the roll of tape on the back because it looks perfect taped right on the front. We're also pretty lazy when it comes to crafting, so it's nice to have something that's so versatile and easy to use.

Stamps
Obviously stamps are a great way to add some excitement onto your scrapbook pages. You can get literally anything on a stamp these days, which is perfect for those of us less artistically inclined. Can't draw a cat? Stamp it! Boom. Done.





Mixed Media
We liked the idea of mixing in some souvenirs and cards we found, just to round out the whole scrapbook a little bit better. For some of our backgrounds, we bought printed paper in Mexico that we then cut out and taped into the book to give our pages a more colorful background. A pack of beachy playing cards also looked nice mixed in with everything, so we stuck them in there, too.

Stickers
Stickers are THE BEST. You can put them on pictures, use them to stick pictures to the page, and decorate the page with them. It's super easy to go overboard with them. (We maybe went a little overboard. It's fine.) But hey, if you love stickers, there are some giant books of them out there that will let you sticker to your heart's content.





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UO x Converse: Herald Square


Every Wednesday through Sunday in June from 11am-8pm come to the Herald Square UO location (1333 Broadway) and get your Chucks customized with our special Converse printer. There are hundreds of designs to pick from, so there's sure to be something for everyone. To get your kicks customized, all you have to do is purchase a pair of Converse from the Herald Square store. The customization itself is completely free, so once you pick out your favorite pair of sneaks, you're good to go.

For more info on Herald Square, click here.


UO Beauty: Christina Rinaldi x Bing Bang

Nail artist Christina Rinaldi of Prima Creative sat in at our Bing Bang NYC launch party last week and made sure everyone who wanted one received a custom manicure that perfectly matched our newly launched BBxUO jewelry line (think delicate and gold). Since we aren't ready to let our manicures chip away forever just yet, Christina provided us with an easy tutorial, along with some of her favorite tips and tricks. Katie



Kintsukuroi Manicure Tutorial
Kintsukuroi = "to repair with gold"; the Japanese art of repairing pottery with gold or silver lacquer and understanding that the piece is more beautiful for having been broken.

Materials:
Base Coat
UO Nail Polish in Optic
Liquid adhesive
White Gold Foil*
Top Coat



Step 1 : Clean, file, buff, base coat.
Step 2 : Paint base color. Keep in mind this look works best with high contrast colors - pick something that’s either drastically light or dark to ensure your foil stands out the most.



Step 3 : Using liquid adhesive, start from one point anywhere on the nail and draw 2 lines extending out from that point. Make the lines thinner at one end to achieve the broken aesthetic. Let dry and apply foil.



Step 4 : Apply your favorite topcoat.**
Step 5 : Admire your Kintsukuroi Nail Art

*Pro Tip : If you do not have foil, you can achieve this look using your favorite gold metallic polish.
**Note : Topcoat will cause foil to shrivel which, in this case, will add to our aesthetic, however it is not recommended for large foiled areas.



About Christina:

I'm originally from the midwest, and have been in Brooklyn for about seven years now. I’ve been painting designs on my nails and friends' nails for as long as I can remember. I became more serious about it when I noticed the popularity my designs were gaining on social media.

My favorite design is anything that has an unexpected element to it, whether it be a beautiful floral with a gold foil handgun or a clean, simple nude nail that has freckles.

The longest I’ve spent on nails was
a solid six hours on a very elaborate full set.

My holy grail products are Seche Vite topcoat and RGB cuticle oil. I take both with me everywhere I go.

I’m particularly inspired by Maurizio Cattelan and Pierpaolo Ferrari of Toilet Paper Magazine. Their concepts are fascinating and I truly love they way they make me think.

This summer I'm listening to
Kelela, Party Next Door, HU₵₵I, Spooky Black.

My favorite spot to go in the summer is McCarren Park Pool.

Read full Bing Bang x UO feature

UO DIY: Plant Hanger


During our outdoor potted plant DIY at our Malibu store, we had one of our talented associates give us her (easy) step-by-step guide on how to make our very own plant hangers. Read on for full instructions, then go make your own! (And we promise, even if you don't have a single Martha Stewart bone in your body, you'll be able to make this.)

DIY Plant Hanger Instructions

Needed:
Spool of cord
(something durable, can be found in jewelry aisle of craft stores)
Key ring
Small potted plant



1) Cut 4 lengths of cord, about 10 inches longer than you want the planter to be when finished.



2) Fold the 4 cords in half at their midpoint. Slide the key ring up to the midpoint and tie a knot to keep it in place.



3) Separate the 8 cords into groups of two. About 8 inches down from the key ring, you are going to tie a basic square knot with the first two cords.



4) To tie the square knot, loop the two cords over each other, as if you're about to tie your shoelaces. Then loop the cords around each other a second time, leading with the opposite cord you started with.

5) Follow this step for the remaining groups of 2 cords. You should be left with 4 knotted strands. 



6) Grab a friend to hold your plant hanger up, or hook the key ring to something. Take the right cord from the first set, and the left cord from the second set about 10 inches down from the knots you've already tied. Tie another square knot.

7) Repeat this with the right cord from the 2nd set, and the left cord from the 3rd set. Continue with the remaining cords.



8) Gather all the cords together and tie in a big knot.



9) Fit your potted plant inside the hanger and enjoy!

Read full Get Outside feature

UO DIY: Flower Crown with Lisa Przystup


Lisa Przystup, a floral designer drawn to the wild over-growths of the countryside, is the talented woman behind James's Daughter Flowers. Her flower crowns can be seen in our recent Stone Cold Fox feature, as well as at Space Ninety 8 this month. Since we're so clearly smitten with her creations, we decided to find out a little more about her and to get some tips for making our very own crowns.
Interview by Katie Gregory





Hey Lisa! How did you get into flower design?
I was working as a freelance writer and I had noticed what seemed to me to be a certifiable trend of lovely, stylish Brooklyn ladies getting into floral design and thought they would be perfect fodder for the New York Magazine’s The Cut’s Style Tribe column. After visiting the designers' studios and interviewing them, I just fell for flowers. I found myself buying cheap bodega flowers and augmenting them with a few precious and expensive stems from Sprout Home. I realized that I actually really enjoyed doing this, and that I wanted to learn more and get better. This past fall I assisted a florist and quietly decided that maybe I would give this a go.

How did you get involved with Space Ninety 8?
I met this lovely crew of super inspirational women when I ended up modeling for Helen Dealtry’s lookbook (a featured Brooklyn designer at Space Ninety 8). These ladies all have studios in Greenpoint in a courtyard that is just so chock full of talent: MCMC Fragrances, Odette, and Bailey Doesn’t Bark all call Dobbin Mews their creative home and they all happen to be featured in Space Ninety 8. These little enclaves are really what make creating in New York so special.

Where do you pull your inspirations?
The wild overgrowth and lines found in nature. The MET. The astounding work of other super talented florists who are light years ahead of me.





How To: Make Your Own Flower Crown

Need:
- Floral wire
- Floral tape
- Wire cutters (to cut the wire)
- Sharp scissors or flower clippers (to cut the flowers)
- Household scissors (to cut the tape)

Flower crowns are so much fun and really easy to make. You’ll need floral wire and floral tape – you can find this at almost any floral supply store online. I recently found this great twine covered floral wire that is heftier and provides a sturdier base for the blooms.

1. Wrap the wire around your head for size, leaving a little extra length. Clip it and fashion two u-shaped hooks that you can hook together – these can be bent and adjusted to size.

2. Now for the flowers: you’ll want some greens for filler and then a handful (it’s really up to you) of about six different types of blooms of various sizes. You’re going to start by trimming the stems, leaving them about three inches long and making small mini bouquets - grasp a spring of filler and one to two flowers, wrap the stems in the floral tape (leaving three to four extra inches of tape) and set it aside. Repeat varying the blooms and greens – once you have a handful of these mini bouquets you can start attaching them to the crown.

3. Take your first bundle and attach it to the wire crown using the extra tail of tape – wind it tightly and securely. Add your next bundle with the flowers covering the stems of the first set you attached, this way you’ve camouflaged the stems. Repeat. You can fill the whole crown with blooms, leaving the larger ones toward the front of the crown or you can just fill half of the crown. Where you stop is entirely up to you.

For the crowns I made for the Stone Cold Fox shoot I chose not to fill the whole crown with blooms – I liked that the negative space drew more focus to the blooms that were there.

You can mist the crown with water and put it in a Ziploc bag to keep in the refrigerator until it’s ready to wear. The sad reality of flower crowns is that they won’t last long – the flowers have no water, so they pretty much have a shelf life of two to three hours. Cherish them.

Read the full Stone Cold Fox feature

UO Beauty: Spring Nails


Since we’ve finally made it through the winter (the horrible, terrible winter) and have a fresh new batch of nail polishes available, we thought this would be the perfect time to get our nails all done up for Spring. Heading out after work with our favorite polishes in tow, we visited Heritage Nails in Philadelphia where nail artist Hani Na worked her magic on us. See the result of her hard work below, as well as some of our favorite tips and tricks for keeping nails lookin’ gooood. Katie




UO Parisian and Art School polishes

1. Use oil to set your manicure. There's like, real nail oil you can use, but in my obsessive perusing of the internet, I've learned that cooking oil does the trick just as well. Just make sure you're careful with where you're spraying or you'll end up with a fine mist of cooking oil on everything you own.

2. This Nail Rescue Kit is actually one of my favorite things in the entire world. The little cuticle snipper is highly addictive. If I don't have time for a real manicure (which is basically all the time), I like to clean up my cuticles and then moisturize with Egyptian Magic. Top it all off with a fresh coat of polish and it's almost as good as going to the salon.


UO Left Bank polish

3. For fine, straight lines, it's always possible to freehand designs with Nail Art Pens, but if you've got shaky baby hands like me, then using Scotch tape to block off sections is always a better option. Just make sure that you stick the tape on your hand a couple of times to get rid of some of the stickiness before putting it on your nails. The Beauty Dept. has some good examples of taped off manicures.


UO Blue Jean and Optic White polish



4. If you're super bad at painting on only your nails, another good trick is to rub some Vaseline or lotion on your cuticles before painting. That way, if you end up smushin' some polish on there, it'll be easier to take off. (I know some people who paint their fingers all willy-nilly and then take a shower to remove the excess nail polish from their cuticles, but that just seems soooo tedious. PRO-TIP FOR YOU.)

5. If you have some nail polish that has thickened over time, DON'T PUT NAIL POLISH REMOVER IN IT! It's a good quick fix if you're antsy, but over time, it'll just make the nail polish even weirder. Instead, pop some clear polish in there. It should thin the polish out enough to use it again and it won't break down over time like nail polish remover would. MAGIC.



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UO DIY: Spring It On

Wish List: Spring Equinox

The first day of spring (which is today if you’re in the Northern hemisphere) is kind of like nature’s version of New Year’s Day. The trees are finally starting to blossom. The days are getting longer. The nights are getting warmer. It’s also the time of year that most people feel compelled to spring clean and start fresh, which is quite fitting considering the Vernal Equinox (as it’s formally called) represents new beginnings. It’s been celebrated as such since ancient times when our ancestors threw huge revelries to bless the freshly planted seeds for the coming year’s harvest. It’s also the end of the astrological year as Pisces moves into Aries, so in essence, nature and the cosmos are perfectly set-up to help you let go of the old and make space for the new. With that in mind, we created a simple ritual to make the most of this magical season.Madeline Giles

You Will Need
Two crystals
Journal and pen
Candle

1. Light candle, take a deep breath and relax. You might want to put on a playlist of songs that make you feel inspired. (I recommend Pure Bathing Culture for ultimate relaxation grooves.)

2. At the top of your journal page write a statement of positive intention. (I like: “I ask for this or something better for the highest good of all concerned.”) Then, begin writing what you would like to manifest. If you feel inspired to write in a list format, begin each sentence with: “I am easily finding myself _______.”

3. When you feel complete, reread the list – and do your best to imagine yourself engaging in these activities. If you feel like you can’t possibly imagine it, then go for a walk and come back to the ritual. It’s important to be in a peaceful and imaginative state when writing your intentions.

4. Imagine all your desires being soaked up into the two crystals in front of you. Know that you don’t have to “do” anything to make this happen. Simply setting the intention will allow it to happen.

5. Find a spot outside where you can safely dig a tiny hole. Bury one of the crystals in the ground. This is symbolic of surrendering your desires to the Earth, while metaphorically “planting” them.

6. Place the other crystal and your list of intentions next to your bed. Reread it at night before you go to sleep and every morning when you wake up. You can refine the list with new intentions as you wish.

UO DIY: Converse Customization


Down in Austin, we had two of our favorite local artists, Sophie Roach and Josh Row, customizing shoes for two days at our downtown store. While shoppin' around one morning, we had Sophie customize some Chucks just for us, and we love how they turned out. (They might even inspire some ideas for your very own DIY kicks.) Now that we realize how easy it is to do ourselves, we're about to buy some sneaks in bulk and get to CRAFTIN'. To customize your own Chucks, all you'll need is acrylic paint, fabric paint or paint pens. That's it! (The acrylic and fabric paint will hold up better than other paints on the shoe, and the paint pens are good for details.) Anything else you'd like to add is up to you. We stuck some pins on ours because we're unable to resist the call of anything Breakfast Club related, but adding studs, colored laces and glitter is an option as well. Check out our kicks below. Katie


Employee creations


Sophie hard at work




Our custom shoes by Sophie (and our totally fake Polaroids)


So many choices


We loved Josh's cat shirt, as well as his "DANG" shoes


Fine Print: The Le Sigh

Since its launch last winter, The Le Sigh has been an online cool girl clubhouse of sorts. With consistently excellent indie music and arts coverage along with a strong allegiance to zine culture, The Le Sigh is one of the best well-rounded blogs in cyberspace today. This month, the Le Sigh girls will be moving to print with THE LE SIGH Vol. 1, a full color publication. The contributor list reads like a who's-who of Tumblr It-girls with work from Grace Miceli, Laurence Philomene, Lauren Cook, and more.

But the glossy, bubblegum pink-tinted zine is not the only thing these ladies have up their sleeves. The Le Sigh is partnering with Brooklyn-based record label Birdtapes to put out a girls-only tape compilation featuring acts such as the twee singer-songwriter Frankie Cosmos and the raucous punk band Priests. The publication and tape, which will be available for purchase online November 18th, will debut at The Le Sigh zine launch party November 17th at Silent Barn, which features performances from musicians on the tape like Whatever Dad, Lizard Kisses, and more. Hazel

You Should Totally Be This For Halloween: A Loving Friend


When you become an adult, Halloween becomes less about ingesting dangerous amounts of candy and more about coming up with a super clever, funny, topical but ironic costume. The stress to outwit your friends can be paralyzing, so in college I decided rather than compete with my friends, I'd just dress up as one of them.  



[Editor's note: NO 40s UNLESS YOU'RE 21, CHILDREN! THESE DUDES ARE 21+. THEY ARE DOIN' IT RIGHT.]

This option works best if the person is well-loved and has an easily identifiable style. When I went as my friend Tim, which required only a flannel, jeans and a pair of New Balance, everybody still got it. You have to choose that type of person. The above photo shows me dressed as my friend Bob (left) with my friend Bob (right). Everyone in the world loves Bob, because he is the best, and everybody knows he wears big glasses and, often, a zip-up jacket. At the time, Bob worked at the Vans store, so I made a fake Vans name tag that said "Bob: Manager/Dreamboat." Let me tell you — the costume was a hit. Also, this works best if the person you're impersonating will be at the same party you're attending, otherwise it's kind of weird.

A disclaimer for any potential mean people out there: this is not about making fun of someone. It's not about wearing a trucker hat because "lame ass Jeff always wears a stupid trucker hat." It's about admiration, lighthearted fun and also being lazy about Halloween costumes. If the costume isn't somebody everybody will recognize and enjoy, it's borderline creepy. Okay, it's borderline creepy anyway, but in a cool way, I swear. Angelo

If you happen to have a friend who's exactly the same as Bob, here's how you can get the look:


Granger Readers


K-Way Claude Windbreaker Jacket


Vans Checkered Slip-On Sneaker

DIY: Goosebumps Nail Art

If you are a fan of the Goosebumps series, and Halloween, and FUN, then you'll definitely want to try out this super easy nail tutorial. It seriously takes only a few minutes, and is easy enough for even me, a DIY failure, to execute, which is a real feat. We chose to do this mani in orange and blue because it matched our favorite Goosebumps book, but obviously you can do it in any color combination. LET YOUR IMAGINATIONS RUN WILD, CHILDREN! Let us all bask in the glorious nostalgia of the '90s with this nail mani. Here's how to get it! —Katie

Get the look:



We chose to use these two polishes! The pen set is great for doing lots of fine details on your nails. The tip is very, very fine. The orange we used is 'Tiny Short' from our UO nail polish, but any polish will do!


NPW Pastel Paint Pens Set


UO Kimchi Blue Collection

Next up...



...paint your nails! If you don't know how to do this, then you're on your own. Put on a couple coats if you're feeling CRAZY. But since the next step is the nail pen, make sure all nail polish is completely dry before you move forward. Otherwise you'll just wreck all your hard work with the hard point of the nail pen.



Once your nails are dry, uncap that nail pen and draw on some drips. Don't worry about being precise. The drippier, the better. The tip of the nail pen makes it easy to spread the nail polish down toward the middle of your nails. Just make sure you don't put the polish on there too thick, because then it'll take forever to dry. (If you don't have a nail pen, you can always use a toothpick in any ol' polish.)



SEE? WOW! We got this done in only a few minutes, and we are in no way experienced nail art artists. Once you've got the drips on (and they're DRY!), go over the whole nail with a top coat. I mean, you don't have to if you're feeling antsy, but it'll obviously make your nails last a whole lot longer.



VOILA! Finished Goosebumps nails. They're so spooky I'm getting GOOSEBUMPS. HEY-OOOOO. And that's it! You're done!

If you try this manicure out, let us know! We love to hear from you guys. Happy Halloween, y'all.


Tumblr: Very Cool Pumpkins


Have you seen the Very Cool Pumpkins Tumblr yet? It's the most important thing in my life right now, because it has very amazing jack-o-lantern stencils. It looks like it's brand new to the Tumblr world, but it already has a Heisenberg stencil, a Drake stencil and even Young Oprah. This is incredible. Get me 1,000 pumpkins, stat. —Katie




Interview: Tepsic Magazine

Tepsic Magazine is the large-format brainchild of Morgan Tepsic, who sends customized disposable cameras to artists and asks them to document their lives. The results are poster-sized spreads of a rarely seen perspective; a trip behind the scenes with musicians like recent cover subjects A$AP Rocky and Toro Y Moi. I spoke with Morgan about the simplicity of disposable cameras, making a DIY magazine and what's next for the mag. Angelo


When did you first realize you wanted to make magazines?
I don't think I ever realized that I wanted to make magazines, really. I just really wanted to share with people great pictures and art from artists that I really respected and liked. I guess magazines were really just the cheapest outlet for me to get stuff I liked out there. The first time I worked on a magazine was in 2009 when I contributed some weird art for a friend's zine. But I wanted to take a concept of a magazine and see how far I could take it.



What drew you to disposable cameras?
The most important thing to me was getting cameras out to as many artists as possible, and so that really left me with no other choice than disposable cameras. But then after I began decorating them for the artists, I really embraced the realness that disposable cameras capture. It can be spontaneously glamorous at times and capture the energy of the night really well, because people aren't afraid of being themselves with a dinky, funky looking camera around. The camera becomes a part of the party and knows that the next night everyone is gonna forget about the pics they took anyway. That's the beauty of it. A camera that's hidden in plain sight.



To me, the large format is nostalgic to when my room used to be plastered with posters and magazine covers. Is that a vibe you were going for? 
Exactly. I remember my brother having a stack of Transworld mags that went up like 5 feet, and I would just spend all day picking out my favorite pics from different issues. I never understood why music magazines were heavily focused on the opinion-side of things. If I had the choice to pay good money to spend on nothing but dope pictures or pages filled with opinions I may not agree with and corny interviews, I'm gonna want the pics every time. I'm doing the magazine for those people who dig looking at pictures.



How do you typically approach an artist you want to feature? How has the response been from musicians?
The approach has always been from the standpoint of a fan. Once the artist realizes that there is a mutual understanding of art in its many forms and how their contribution would be dope, then it's cake. The response has definitely changed since the first issue. I got ignored by a lot of artists that I ended up printing in future issues because THEY contacted me. Just goes to show being persistent pays off.



People like A$AP Rocky, Toro Y Moi, even Anthony Bourdain — those are huge gets. Do you feel like now nobody is out of your reach? Who's somebody huge you would love to feature in Tepsic, or can you give a hint at who might show up in the next issue or two?
Nobody is out of my reach. I may not get an artist immediately when I want to, but I usually find a way to eventually explain to their crew what I'm doing is something they need to be a part of. I'm never going to give out hints of who's in the next issue, but I will say that I would print an entire issue shot by Kanye if I ever got the chance. I need to get that on the record just in case he's out there shopping on UO or something.



The mag is almost entirely image based. Is that a direct refusal of text-heavy publications? Do you plan to feature more writing in the future or is Tepsic inherently an image driven project? 
I'm not going to say I'll never feature writing in the magazine, because at the end of the day it's a magazine created by the artists featured...so if an artist felt the need to express themselves using text, then I wouldn't be opposed to it. But as for now, I like to keep it with as many photos as possible without anything you don't need. I'm creating a personal commentary between the pictures the artists take and the readers of the magazine. 



What advice would you give to kids who want to make magazines but think it might be too hard or expensive?
If you're strapped for cash use a Xerox machine and do what you can. Letting loose of your creative side is the best thing you can do for your mind. Even if the project you're working on kinda sucks, it's still one step closer to another great idea/project/whatever. The first magazines I ever made were used making a simple word-processing app that was free, and if you don't have a computer then I'm wondering how you can read this right now.

Who are 3 artists you're especially digging right now?
Kanye, Drake, DJ Shadow 

Where do you see Tepsic in 3.66 years? 

I'm not gonna stop evolving and changing how I deliver the message of Tepsic. Times change, people change what they like, technology changes how we see things and I change my mind pretty much every 30 minutes. But if you stick around for the ride, I guarantee the journey is exciting to watch.


DIY: Make Your Own Terrarium


In case you haven't noticed, terrariums are all the rage right now. Like me, you probably wanted to get a bunch to put in your room or office, but weren't sure how! Well, you're in luck because making terrariums is probably the easiest DIY you can think of, all you need is a few easy to find supplies, plus something to put those all in! The other day in Malibu, Urban Outfitters opened a brand new store. To celebrate, we had this great DIY terrarium session I'm about to recap for you. To start, you can find tons of terrariums and planters on our website and in stores right now! Get ready to make the room decorations of your dreams. Maddie



First, you'll want to start with a glass vase sort of thing, aka a terrarium! They come in lots of geometric shapes, some that sit on a surface, or can hang from a tree. We even have light-bulb shaped ones. You can purchase any kind you like right here.











Next, you'll want to gather your materials to go inside of your terrarium. I'm thinking various plant matter, like air plants, moss, and things like that. It is best to choose plants you don't have to water that much, since personally I feel that the point of terrariums is to have them be self-sufficient, aka, you only water them about once a week. Succulent plants work well too! Also grab some sand or smaller pebbles, some larger rocks for decoration, and any other fun things you'd like to put inside, like the little dinosaur I put inside.



Once you've gotten everything together to make the terrarium, its time to start assembling! Start with filling the bottom of your container with sand or small pebbles. Not too much! You don't want it to be overfull, gotta have room for all of the other things.



Here's an example with smaller rocks at the bottom.



Then start to fill with your plants and rocks!







Once you've put everything inside your terrarium, add your last minute touches, like my little dino pal here, or whatever you want! You could put vintage pins, little figurines, crystals, basically all of the above.

After that, you're essentially done! You can arrange everything inside however you'd like, its usually best to put the first layer of rocks or sand, then the plants, then embellishments. That way, everything will stay put. Here are some examples of the terrariums that came out of the event!









Like what you see and want to make your own? Get started on your terrarium here, and get decorating!

The Pop-Up Institute for Craft and Ingenuity at Space 15 Twenty


In the pop-up space at Space 15 Twenty (1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd) this month, you'll find a whole new creative experience, presented by Hand-Eye Supply. During the rest of August through the first few weeks of September, Hand-Eye Supply, a retail store from Portland, Oregon that focuses on helping communities design and work together creatively, will be taking over the space to open The Pop-Up Institute for Craft & Ingenuity.

This new shop will be stocked with crafting and DIY supplies and tools, plus throughout the month there will be educational opportunities and events that Hand-Eye calls "a physical manifestation of our aspirations." Sounds pretty cool, right? If you're ready to get your DIY on and let those creative juices go wild, attend the opening party this Friday, August 16th at Space 15 Twenty from 6pm to 9pm! There will be live letterpress printing by Tabletop Made, and music by Neil Schield of Origami Vinyl. RSVP here. Maddie

DIY Cosplay: Captain Marvel


Let's take our lazy cosplay to the next level. We're going to transform a piece of Urban clothing into Captain Marvel's new uniform. Just follow these simple and easy-to-comprehend steps. I would like to preface this post by saying that blogging is a completely different skill set from technical writing. Christina

First, research the character. Between multiple artists, cartoon or movie appearances, costume updates, or fan recreations, there will be several different versions of your character's costume. If you have trouble getting a full view of the costume from official art, try checking out fan art, toys and statues, or other cosplayers. (Checking out other cosplayers may all help you figure out tricky parts of the costume. These characters tend to have idealized bodies wearing fabric that fits in impossible ways.) Here's what I found for Captain Marvel:


The costume's primarily navy with yellow and red accents. It has raglan sleeves with red piping along the sleeve seams. She wears gloves that reach mid-forearm; each glove has five gold buttons on it that go from the edge of the glove to the wrist. There are two matching buttons on the collar. She has an eight-pointed star on her chest that is matched by the medallion closure on the sash. There are two yellow stripes that go around the upper chest, back, and arms. They form a V in the front and on the arms. There is a black or navy gap between the stripes and around the star on the chest.


The gold V on the back mimics the shape of the front. The red sash rides high on the right hip and low on the left hip. Here the boots are high heels and reach mid-calf.


In this picture, the raglan seam and the piping are lower on the side. The gold zipper is long; it reaches from the bottom edge of the collar to the crotch. She has flat red boots with seven more matching gold buttons. (It's six gold buttons on the very first picture of this post.) Unlike her previous costume, the ends of the sash are short.

Next, be honest with yourself. Decide which one you like best and which one would be best for you. I don't believe in that bullshit that you should only cosplay characters that match your body type/skin color/gender/whatever. At the same time, cosplay can be a lot of work and a lot of money. Don't bother working your ass off on a body armor bikini if the idea of showing that much skin in public makes you freak. Also use this time to decide if you want to carry any props such as weapons. It's a different skill set from making a costume and you may need to budget more time.

Being honest with myself, I do not have the time nor the money to make the full Captain Marvel costume. Especially not the money. I don't even really feel like making the sash, the medallion, or the gloves. So, we're gonna keep this one easy. We're taking a hoodie and adding some cheap fabric and notions to it. Imagine Captain Marvel on her day off, hanging around the Avengers mansion in her sweatpants with Spider-Woman. That's the look I'm going for.

Now let's make some stuff! I'm going to use a sewing machine but if you feel more comfortable painting on the fabric or hand sewing or knitting, do that instead. The point is to have fun, not to drive yourself insane. We're going to use this BDG hoodie as our base:


BDG Speckled Raglan Zip-Up Hoodie

I would take a picture of myself wearing it, but I haven't showered in three days. I look and smell like Swamp Thing.

Besides being super warm and comfy, it already has raglan sleeves and comes in the perfect shade of navy. The zipper is white and silver instead of gold, but zippers can always be replaced. Same with the drawstring. You will also need:

1/2 yd each of red and yellow knit fabrics 
thread
pencil and paper
ruler
scissors
pins

The rectangle on the sweatshirt is a packet of red piping, meant to highlight the raglan seams. As I went on, I decided against using it. I felt like ripping open seams was a little too much work for lazy cosplay.

Get out your pencil and paper and start sketching. With my ruler, I measured the different pieces of the sweatshirt: front, back, and sleeve. Be sure to mark seam allowancesfold lines, the top of the pattern piece vs. the bottom, etc.; mark anything that will help you keep the pieces straight and will help you remember how they go together.

This is my sleeve. For me, the sleeve was the trickiest part of the sweatshirt. I bet it's really easy for you, isn't it. I marked the fold line (top of photo) and I added a 1/2" seam allowance (bottom of photo). Seam allowances are usually between 3/8" and 5/8". Make sure you keep them all the same width. 

This will be the part of the project where your cat will get angry that you're not paying attention to her. She does not forgive and she will never forget.

When you have your basic pattern pieces drawn, that's when you start color blocking. Keep your research materials close by. We have the red shoulders, a yellow star, two yellow stripes, and the navy/black gaps. I started with the star. It's the part of the costume that grabs the eye. The problem, of course there's a problem, is that I couldn't get the star to look how I wanted. The angles were all wonky and some points were longer than others. Thank God for the internet.

I Googled "captain marvel star" and printed out a Marvel cover in three different sizes.

I cut out all three and pinned them to the sweatshirt one by one until I decided on which one I liked and where I wanted it to be on the sweatshirt.

Measure from the top of the zipper tape to the top point of the star. Use that measurement to properly place the star on your pattern piece. Remember that the star is split vertically by the zipper, so you'll only be tracing half of the star. If we go back and look at our research, we see that stripes don't match up exactly with the points of the star. The center gap doesn't match up with the concave part of the star either. 

As you can see, I drew the star and the stripes before changing my mind and moving it all a few inches lower. Don't be afraid to make a mess of your pattern. 

To make sure that the stripes line up, I cut out the pattern pieces (last chance to add seam allowances!) and matched up the seams. You can line up your ruler with the stripes and just continue you them onto the sleeve. Because of the angle of the stripes and the fold line of the sleeve, the stripes will automatically form the V shape. Do the same with the sleeve and the back pattern piece.

I deleted the photo that showed the next step because it was blurry and never took a better shot. You see those stripes? Imagine them even longer and going towards the right.

For the gaps between the stripes, we're gonna use negative space instead of cutting narrow strips of fabric. Using your ruler, draw parallel lines next to your stripes to form the gaps. Mine are 1/8" wide. Do the same for the stripes on the sleeve and back pieces and the star.

I colored in the lines to better visualize the negative space. At this point, you may also want to mark which pieces are red and which are yellow.

Cut out your red and yellow pattern pieces, leaving the negative space behind. Fold your fabric in half and lay out your pattern pieces. If they move around a lot, you can pin them to the fabric or weigh them down with soup cans. 

All of the back and sleeve pieces will be cut on the fold. Remember to cut two of the sleeve pieces. The front pieces will not be cut on the fold; you will need two of these pieces are well. Starting with the red pieces, pin then sew them together and then pin them to your sweatshirt.

Do you guys see the error I made? Like I said earlier, the sleeves were the trickiest part for me. The sleeves ended up being pointy at the neck seam and slightly too big.

See? Too much fabric on the shoulders. If this happens to you, feel free to either redraw and recut your fabric or dart the hell out of it. If you dart, your seams will not line up like you hoped.

Not only did I feel like Pinhead, I stuck myself so many times with these pins that I ended up bleeding. I suffer for this blog.

Using the pins, I marked 1/8" from the bottom of the red piece. I recommend pinning the star in place next. Mark 1/8" around the star. Sew the pieces of the top stripe together then pin that whole piece to the sweatshirt. You may have to re-pin the star and the stripes several times to get everything in the right places. Take your time. What's your rush? New York Comic Con's not until October. 

Sew the top stripe in place. Mark 1/8" from the bottom of the top stripe.

No one wanted to model this for me. Note: get different friends or get much better at selfies.

Did you know that sewing professionals don't use pins? When you're a pro, pins just slow you down or break your machine.

Sew together the pieces of the bottom stripe then sew it onto the sweatshirt. Finally, sew on the star.

At this point, your cat will enact her revenge by farting on your sewing machine table and stinking up the whole room. What a jerk.

And we're done with the sweatshirt! Mostly. You can keep working on it by trimming any uneven stripes, finishing the edges with a satin stitch or some other embroidery stitch, adding buttons, or using a scarf as the sash. Make it as complicated as you like. I'm stopping here so I still have time to play Tomb Raider.

So dainty with the drawstring.

This kind of looks like a Captain Marvel Romper.

To finish the Captain Marvel look, try styling you hair with VERB Sculpting Clay and pinning it back with Hershesons Get A Grip Hair Pin. Her makeup is pretty light. Try bh cosmetics 28-Shade Neutral Eye Shadow Palette and NYX Extra Creamy Round Lipstick in Chic Red or Ulysses. 

Now that I've made this semi-prototype, I'm pretty sure I'm going to make the full suit for Halloween. It feels right. And I want those boots.

Rule 63 Cosplay

Rule 63: For every given male character, there is a female version of that character; conversely, for every given female character, there is a male version of that character. 

Cosplay: A portmanteau of costume and play; a subculture based on the creation of character costumes and roleplay.

Rule 63 Cosplay: The photos I end up staring at and thinking, "Oh, god. I would read the SHIT out of that comic." Christina

Scarecrow, Joker, Riddler, and Two Face
This Two Face costume is what Tommy Lee Jones should have worn. He'd look amazing in feather lashes.

Pink Ranger
I will always give it up for a Power Ranger.

(Back) Green Lantern, Flash, Black Canary, Green Arrow, Powerboy, Superwoman, Wonder Man, Vixen, Batwoman; (Front) Aquawoman, Plastic Woman
This Genderbent Justice League took the internet by storm in 2011 and they're still one of the best examples of a group cosplay done right. Hello, Powerboy.

Jughead
Jughead always seemed like a better choice than Archie - you know, if you ignore the fact that he's not really attracted to anyone. Who wants to be strung along while your crush goes off and dates a bunch of impossibly pretty, impossibly rich girls? (Oh, didn't I mention? I'm a total Betty.) 

Havok, Cyclops, and Colossus
Anything that might make Cyclops bearable. And Colossus, your bodysuit is incredible. I've never seen lamè so shiny that it worked like a mirror.

Babe Sapien and HellGrrl
Blue and Red, paranormal investigators from the Civil War and Hell, respectively.

Captain America
This is Christine of the Dangerous Ladies, my favorite cosplay group on the whole entire internet. (I've been fangirling from afar for quite some time. Like, the check-to-see-what-they're-working-on-daily sort of fangirling.) Check out their tumblr for tutorials, tons of progress photos, and real talk about feminism, superhero movies, and body positivity. Now get stitchin'!

Camp Crafts: Sparkle Jars


Wow, I am a veritable craft queen, am I not? (Don't answer that.) But I am going to for real use my mid-'90s Leo mason jar to hold work pens, like an adult, because I love it. While I may have the crafting skills of a 4-year-old, that doesn't mean I can't have fun making things. We have so many craft books here at the office that I was finally like, "I am going to bust out my very limited craft skills, y'all. It is going to be the arts and crafts tent at summer camp up in here." The above mason jars were an idea from the DIY Mason Jars book, and they were totally easy. Come, let me show you my jars. —Katie

Craft inspiration:


DIY Mason Jars

This book is super cute. It has a ton of cool ideas that all use mason jars (duh), which is great because mason jars are like, $1 and super easy to find at any craft store. I chose to do these glitter jars (for storage of my treasures) because I'm a little rusty on the crafts front, and they seemed pretty foolproof. Obviously they came out amazingly. All you need is some Mod Podge, glitter, a paintbrush and a dream. To apply the glitter, you just coat a thin layer of Mod Podge on the inside of the jar and go to town dumping glitter inside! Just make sure to shake out any excess.



Once the inner Mod Podge dries after a couple hours, you can go back in and put more Mod Podge on top of the glitter to seal everything up. Then you'll be able to throw change, flowers, barrettes, marbles, love notes, and whatever else you want in there without coating everything in glitter.



As you can see, I also threw some temporary tattoos on these jars, just because WHY NOT! You apply them to the jar the same way you'd apply them to your body, and the best part is that they last forever. I turned Tattooed Leo Jar into a beautiful vase, but once those flowers die he is gonna be the best pen receptacle in the world.



The book recommended putting little baby tea lights in the jars to create super fly and glittery nightlights. FUN! Now go make your own! I'm off to go make a Pacey Witter nightlight jar with this image. It's gonna be perfect.

Nail Art with Floss Gloss: Round Two


Janine and Aretha from Floss Gloss are back! Using inspiration from the Bazaaaaar Pop-Ups in L.A. and NYC, and products from our site, the duo has created three unique and easy-to-follow tutorials to get your nails on-trend just in time for summer. It's Round Two and we're even more excited than last week to try this out in the office! If you missed last week's nail art, make sure to try it out here!


Janine: "This week I was inspired by the Della x UO Strapless Romper.



The thing I love most about Africa Prints, which I mentioned last week, is that they are so organic in nature. So for any nail art skill level there really is no "wrong." I loved the heavy opaque dots in the rompers print. This is quick and hot nail art look. Perfect for time-conscious nail art babes.

The Polish:  
I used Floss Gloss Ltd Pro Nail Lacquer in Bassline, Glowstar, Wavepool, and Con Limon for the base colors (all colors are available here). I used Partybruise and Glowstar for the accent dots with my dotting tools and topped it off with Gloss top coat. Dotting tools can be purchased at local beauty supply, but also be found or made easily at home, for example: ballpoint pen, top of a dressmaking pin, toothpick, etc... get creative! 




The Steps:


First, basecoat all nails—always!!



For base color I've been obsessed with this mini french-tip-inspired nail—it's quick, easy and chic. I love wearing this alone in multiple colors when I'm in a rush and have bare nails or with nail art. Just apply a short swipe of the base color with the nail polish brush leaving half of your nail natural. Like last week, I chose to do a multi-hued mani. This adds more variety and color! You can stop here and choose to top coat or continue with nail art. 




I used the lid to a jar for my pallet and dropped a bit of polish in each shade I'd be dotting with. 



Begin dotting at the tip of the nail on the base color. A lot or a little—it's up to you. I chose to add more at the tip and work my way back to the cuticle adding dots sparingly to give a gradient effect. Play with multiple dotting colors, in different shades or glitter. Play with a full nail of base color, vary the size of dots, or add less... the possibilities are endless! Repeat on the other hand for a full mani or just play with various fingers.




Finished! The result is a printed mani, sure to catch the eyes of all of your BFFs.



Shop Floss Gloss and make sure to check back next week for Round Three!

Follow the girls on Facebook and Twitter at @FlossGloss 

3D Printed Pizza



Yo, NASA has been killin' it lately! First they're like, "Don't worry, Earth! We're making it possible for you to send all those idiots you hate into outer space! Forever!" Now they're like, "You know what? We have some extra money lying around. How about we figure out how to create pizza from nothing?" Like... are you kidding me?! You dudes are putting all your genius-ness to good use. I really like that someone made one 3D printer and then everyone else was like, "YES, LET'S RUN WITH THIS!" and now we've got everything from dresses to iPhone cases. In honor of that, here are some other things we should make. —Katie



Ourselves
Pretty sure if they can make pizza from dust, then they could make a clone for everyone. I mean, you could definitely make me by throwing in some like, Backstreet Boys CDs, 4 blueberry Red Bulls, a tub of Sour Patch Kids and a cat sweater. How happy would everyone be if some beautiful plastic counterparts could take over their day jobs? Score.

The best pet
You could make the best pet because 1) it would be anything you can dream up (a unicorn badger! Gorgeous and terrifying!) and 2) it would never poop anywhere because it would have no insides. And also you wouldn't have to feed it. Wow!

A fucking rad car
So, they can make 3D-printed guns, but those aren't fun at all, and are also sort of nightmarish. Let's instead put all that awesome technology towards making everyone their very own flying Falcor machines.


We'd all be so fucking happy.

The hippest furniture
First of all, 3D printed furniture would probably be surprisingly comfy, and second of all, think about how many swaggy chaise lounges you could make. A TON!

A DVD that explains what 3D printing is
Because like, does anyone even understand how this works?