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Near and Far: Victory Press x UO


Victory Press is designer Jessica Humphrey and artist Jonathan Cammisa, collaborating to create a collection of men’s clothing inspired by post modern art, prints and silhouettes of ‘80s skate and surf culture, and the functionality, integrity and ideology of ‘90s outdoors wear.

En route to launch a Victory Press pop-up event at our Los Angeles-based concept store Space 15 Twenty, Jess and Jonathan drove across the country, visiting American factories and getting up close and personal with the country’s great outdoors. Here, the design duo lets us in on every adventure of their nationwide trek.







How did you two come together and launch Victory Press?
Jess: Jonathan grew up in South Philadelphia skating. He was heavy into grafitti and hip hop, and he spent his summers at the Jersey Shore. I grew up in Virginia Beach surrounded by surfing and skateboarding, and as a teenager photographed every punk and hardcore band that came through my town. We met about five years ago in Vinegar Hill, a small neighborhood in Brooklyn. We both were obsessed with 1980s and ‘90s vintage clothing and we had the same taste in art and music, so we became best friends. We decided to start a clothing line out of a shared realization that outdoors wear just wasn't cool. We wanted to make outdoors wear that like-minded people want to wear.

Tell us about the Victory Press pop-up that brought you across the country!
Our friend Kyle came to our studio one day and proposed we set up shop at Space 15 Twenty for the summer of 2014. As a new brand, we were stoked on the opportunity to build out a space with our creative vision and spread our ideas to the West Coast. So, we though it was only appropriate to see the country on our way here so we can tell our story to you.







What was your favorite city or pit-stop along the way?
Mystic Hot Springs, Utah was by far the most interesting destination. We spent a few hours soaking in old claw foot tubs filed in with mineral rich hot springs with epic views of the Utah Mountains. Mystic Mike, who hosts the property, has an extensive collection of posters and stickers he's illustrated for touring bands, including the Grateful Dead. He also has a YouTube channel where he hosts live music and does an awesome job recording. There is also a collection of buses previously owned by Deadheads, for which you can rent and sleep over, if you want. It was truly a mystical moment. And then there was Yellowstone National Park—there are no words for how beautiful it is there.

Any travel mishaps?
Not really. We had good vibes on our side!

What was your day-to-day life like on the road?
We woke up. I'd heat us up some Grady's Coffee we cold brewed the night before. I might have some time to make breakfast while the boys break down the camp. If not, it was Early Bird Granola and yogurt and then we were on the road. Some days were long drives—almost 14 hours. We literally drove until it was time to sleep. Our meals that day would be "Jon's Back Seat Turkey Sandwiches" and the good old gas station special. The other days we'd drive for six hours or so and set up camp. We'd cook chili or hamburgers, relax, shoot our BB gun, then go to sleep extra early, wake up, maybe do a hike and then hit the road again. We were lucky enough to spend a good stint in Yellowstone and Utah where we could meander a little more and soak up the environment. We drove through 15 states in seven days, so there wasn't a whole lot of time to stay idle.







What were some of the best and worst meals you had while traveling?
The best meal was the chili we cooked over campfire the first night in Yellowstone. We brought our cast iron dutch oven and made a slow cooked chili and cornbread. We set up camp with the Grand Teton mountains as our backdrop, with no other human in site. It was magical. We actually ruled on the food tip. Even the sixth time we had turkey sandwiches, they were delicious!

What are your top five travel essentials?
Our trusty Birkenstocks, Oberto Beef Jerky, Snowpeak Titanium Stove, our dog, Jasper, and Santa Maria Novella Potpourri (for the stinky truck).

What advice would you give to someone about to embark on a cross-country trip?
Give yourself a good month because there is too much awesomeness to see.





The Victory Press x Ours Gallery summer pop-up shop at Space 15 Twenty (1520 N. Cahunega Blvd) is open now and runs through July 27, 2014.


UPDATE: Now you can watch the video Victory Press made with the help of Nathan Caswell about their cross country trip!

UO DIY: Scrapbooking


After visiting Tulum recently to shoot our newest lookbook, we had so many new Instax photos that we didn't know what to do with all of them. Rather than hang them up, we decided to start a scrapbook/journal hybrid for them, so we could keep all our pics in one spot and also write down some of our favorite memories. Instagram is good but when it comes to keeping track of a bunch of photos, sometimes it's best to go back to a good ol' fashioned notebook. Read on to see what we did!





Organize
If you, like us, take a boatload of photos, you'll want to sit down before scrapbooking to decide which pics you want to include and which pics you're going to shove in a box somewhere. It's also nice to be able to look at everything in front of you before you start working, just so you can make sure you have everything you need. Above were our basic supplies for this project. The notebook we're using to start out is this super fun (and bright!) unruled Leuchtturm journal.

Keep It Simple
It's easy to want to throw five pictures on each page with 30 different artistic touches, but it usually (not all the time!) looks better when the clutter is kept to a minimum. (But if you've figured out how to make clutter look amazing, give us a call, because we love glitter and stickers.)





Washi Tape
We love washi tape for scrapbooking because 1) it's adorable and 2) it's the easiest way to adhere pictures. You don't even have to worry about doing the roll of tape on the back because it looks perfect taped right on the front. We're also pretty lazy when it comes to crafting, so it's nice to have something that's so versatile and easy to use.

Stamps
Obviously stamps are a great way to add some excitement onto your scrapbook pages. You can get literally anything on a stamp these days, which is perfect for those of us less artistically inclined. Can't draw a cat? Stamp it! Boom. Done.





Mixed Media
We liked the idea of mixing in some souvenirs and cards we found, just to round out the whole scrapbook a little bit better. For some of our backgrounds, we bought printed paper in Mexico that we then cut out and taped into the book to give our pages a more colorful background. A pack of beachy playing cards also looked nice mixed in with everything, so we stuck them in there, too.

Stickers
Stickers are THE BEST. You can put them on pictures, use them to stick pictures to the page, and decorate the page with them. It's super easy to go overboard with them. (We maybe went a little overboard. It's fine.) But hey, if you love stickers, there are some giant books of them out there that will let you sticker to your heart's content.





Shop Travel Journal Essentials

Meet The Designer: Marisa Haskell


California-based jewelry designer Marisa Haskell has been creating handmade jewelery ever since she was young, and after being fans of her line for ages, we're happy to announce our exclusive Marisa Haskell x UO collaboration is now available online. We chatted with Marisa about how she chose the pieces for her UO collaboration, how California influenced her growing up and the challenges she's faced as an artist.
Photographs by Emily Dulla





Tell us a little bit about yourself and your background. How did growing up in California influence the rest of your life?

I grew up in the Santa Barbara mountains in a house my parents built over the course of about 10 years. My parents were antique dealers and great designers and our house was always full of eclectic art, jewelry and textiles. We lived far enough out from town that you would hike to your friend's houses, or find creative ways to entertain yourself. Being outside, surfing, making things was a big part of my youth. It helps breathe a bit of independence into you that can be hard to shake. Everyday I try to get outside and create a little bit of this kind of environment in my life.

When & how did you first become interested in working with leather and jewelry making?
When I was about 15 I was helping my grandma and we came across some beautiful deer hides that she had tanned years back. She gave me the hides as well as some tools and taught me a bit about basic leather work. I began to realize the satisfaction of using thing that you had handmade. Working with leather was great because it provides many limitations- it was about taking the time, observing the material and keeping it simple, which is important in all design. I started making jewelry with scraps left behind and overtime my interest evolved and I found myself incorporating other materials and refining my aesthetic.



You spent some time living and working in Mexico; How did that shape your life and your career path?
Living in Mexico happened somewhat unintentionally. I had just finished college and as much as I wanted to, I didn't have a set plan yet, so I took a trip down there. I got a job and then a month long trip turned into 3 months, then 6, then a little over a year. I worked, surfed and made things. There was a lot of space for creativity and I didn't many of the distractions and anxieties I would have had back home. I learned how to be happy through simplifying my life. These days I work a ton and tend to take on as much as I can handle and so it is great to try to remember the value of just cutting back sometimes, simplifying, and make space for what you love most.

Who is the customer you design for? Do you have a dream customer?
Having my store in Oakland, CA has been an amazing experience because I get to meet so many awesome people and see them wearing the pieces. Oakland is a really diverse place, so you get the full spectrum of people shopping the line which has been rewarding to see. Dream customer? I had Linda Evangelista (who has been on the cover of Vogue more times then one can count) purchase some pieces from me the first month I started out. I figured that if someone who has been in the industry for so long liked it, then maybe this could work.







Can you tell us about your design process? How does a single piece go from an idea in your head to a finished product?
When I go to design a new collection I begin with drawings and then I start putting materials together and experimenting. Properly using materials is crucial to me - Find what is unique about leather and show that. Bring out what is different about brass. I make tons of samples and start pulling things together and seeing how the scale is working, the weight, the balance. Making all of my samples is critical to my process; working, adapting, and changing them as needed. Some styles come together in a few hours and other times I will spend days and get nothing. I know a piece is done when I want to take off whatever I have on and wear that one instead.

What have been your proudest moments and your biggest challenges?
The biggest challenge was getting over the intimidation of going into this industry. I thought there was some magic formula for making it happen. Turns out its mostly about being willing to work really hard, do things you don't think you can pull off, and having your eyes peeled for lucky breaks. As far as running my business goes- creating a system where we can make everything for my line by hand in our studio in Oakland has also been a huge challenge. It feels good though- building your team, making it by hand and feeling proud of the camaraderie you create.

Can you tell us about your UO collab?
Working with UO, we wanted to design great statement pieces for a wide audience. I feel like the type of person that shops at Urban Outfitters is so diverse that I really wanted the styles to be bold but wearable by someone of a variety of fashion leanings. We kept the pieces very true to my line and we made them easy to wear for a wide audience.

Studio Visit: Alia Penner


Alia Penner is a modern-day pop artist based in Los Angeles. Penner lives in a quiet, colorful home atop a hill in the Mount Washington area of Los Angeles that overlooks Downtown. Inside her home you'll also find her studio, where she works her magic. Penner's home is a place of absolute wonder; the rooms are filled with her own work, found objects, and of course, her furry grey cat, Edie. Aside from traditional mediums, Alia also works with fashion and film. Currently she works largely with Cinespia, and recently worked with Anna Sui. I had a quick chat with Alia to learn a bit more about her work, and how much she loves balloons and Miss Piggy.
Interview by Maddie Sensibile

Alia Penner wearing Romance Was Born's 'Dream On' collection.



Hi Alia! Tell me a little bit about yourself and how you came to be an artist.
I grew up in Topanga Canyon, which is a really special place to grow up in. I’m actually third generation; my grandfather lived there and then my dad grew up there too, right next door to where I grew up. Now I live in Mount Washington which is kind of like Topanga-ish, close to Downtown L.A. I always wanted to be an artist. Ever since I can remember, I wanted to be a cartoonist, I wanted to be a fashion designer, and I wanted to be anything that had to do with art. I just drew all the time, since before I can remember. I went to art school at Otis, and I’ve just been a freelance artist since I graduated.

Your work is definitely reminiscent of the 1960s and '70s. What about that time period stands out to you?
I guess just the color and freedom. I feel like the '60s and '70s were also pretty inspired by other time periods as well. So it’s kind of like when people say that my art is inspired by '60s and '70s, I feel like there’s so many different places that I’m taking inspiration from, like art nouveau, or deco. There’s just so many points are jumping off points. I love psychedelic artwork.



Other than those decades, what primarily inspires your work?
I’m a big collector of books. I think books are really important, and I think you should have as many as you can fit in your house. I love having things in my hands. I love searching for things, I love treasure hunting, I love going to flea markets and finding crazy things. I just found this insane wheel of fortune from this old carnival. I’m super into movies and I watch them all the time. My boyfriend started the movies at the Hollywood Forever cemetery, so I help program movies there, which is so inspiring. It's fun to curate and create a whole experience. I’m really excited about Gentlemen Prefer Blondes on June 21. But just being able to pick something like that…Gentlemen Prefer Blondes!  The photobooth is going to be amazing!


"DVF Pop Wrap Animation for the Warhol Foundation made by me"

You do a lot of collaborative work as well. What do you enjoy most about pairing fashion with art?
I love working in fashion. I think you should dress as silly and crazy as you want every day. I love dressing up and playing a role which goes back to movies, and being inspired by fashion and movies. Making clothes on my own was really exciting and hopefully I get to do more of that in the future, selling my dresses at Colette. I only made like ten of them or something. I really love working with Anna Sui, and I think we will be working together again soon. I did her backdrop for her fashion show a couple seasons ago, and she’s such a hero and so cool. I got to visit her in her studio and she had books everywhere stacked high as the ceiling.

What are your go to films that have impeccable fashion and art direction?
My favorite, favorite ones…I love Smile with Bruce Dern. That movie is one of my favorites. I love pageants and over the top fashions for that, the ‘70s rad teenage girls in that are really funny. I love musicals, all kinds of musicals. I could watch Esther Williams and all those amazing Ziegfeld Follies all day long. I just watched Witches of Eastwick again, and there’s this one scene in it that blew my mind. I’m obsessed with balloons and re-watching the scene where they’re holding thousands of pink balloons in the ballroom and then they dance through them... I mean, what beats that?


Alia Penner's Balloon Girl Performance starring Labanna Babalon.



Who would you call your style icon?
Miss Piggy, definitely, is a style icon for me. I love Miss Piggy, I love the Muppets. I have a book called Miss Piggy’s Guide to Life and there are some really important lessons.
Zandra Rhodes, another designer that I’ve met and interviewed before, she is just insanely cool. Pink hair. Like, I love how rad you can be when you’re old. You don’t have to be an insane plastic surgery lady. You can be a badass with pink hair and tons of black eyeliner and wear whatever you want. I almost can’t wait to be that.

What has been your favorite project to date?
I directed my first music video for Jena Malone this year, which was a really special experience to work with her. We covered her in flowers and glitter and nothing else. Another favorite project I did last year was painting Katy Perry’s piano. That’s probably the best. It's so special because it’s this object that you know is gonna be around forever. It's covered in red roses and ice cream colors. It was great to work on it over the course of a couple months. I feel like everything has to happen so fast nowadays, so to be able to even spend time painting something is just a pleasure. I wouldn’t mind doing that all the time.


"Katy Perry's piano in my studio"



Who is your dream artistic collaboration?
My dream artistic collaboration would be to create a DREAM Theme Park with Niki de Saint Phalle & Yayoi Kusama.

Alia Penner is represented by Weiss Artists. Check out Alia Penner's website and Instagram.

UO x Converse: Herald Square


Every Wednesday through Sunday in June from 11am-8pm come to the Herald Square UO location (1333 Broadway) and get your Chucks customized with our special Converse printer. There are hundreds of designs to pick from, so there's sure to be something for everyone. To get your kicks customized, all you have to do is purchase a pair of Converse from the Herald Square store. The customization itself is completely free, so once you pick out your favorite pair of sneaks, you're good to go.

For more info on Herald Square, click here.


Meet the Designer: Helena Young-Meyer


This month, UK-born designer Helena Young-Meyer, the woman behind HYM Salvage, is showing off her one-of-a-kind home goods at Urban Outfitters' Space Ninety 8 concept store in Williamsburg, and also worked with Urban Renewal on a unique denim collaboration. We visited her Fishtown studio where she gave us a peek into her working life (hint: it's filled with vintage fabrics and pug puppies) and told us all her must-see vintage shops in the area.
Interview by Katie Gregory. Photos by Rachel Albright.





Hey Helena! How long have you been working on furniture specifically for Space Ninety 8?
About a month, I’d say? It’s hard to say, exactly. I’ve done an online range, and then another collection for Space 15 Twenty in L.A. on top of this collection for Space Ninety 8. And now I’m researching and looking for furniture for the Harold Square store. Right now I have no furniture because I’ve got rid of it all! I get the concept books so I get an idea of what they want it to look like and then I go from there sourcing the fabric and furniture.

Any awesome spots that you get your furniture from?
At this point it’s been varied. I’ll go to Adamstown or…well, I haven’t bought anything from Jinxed yet, but that’s a great place to look in Philadelphia. I also like to go to the Mid-Century Furniture Warehouse where I just got a bunch of stuff from. Whenever I’m out and about I’m always looking into vintage places. Some of the stuff I already have, like stuff I’ve collected over the years. I'm pretty cleaned out at the moment, though. I need to start collecting again.





And what about fabrics?
Sometimes it’s harder to find at the vintage spots. The best places we’ve found were in L.A. I went to the Rose Bowl and made contacts with a bunch of people and now I know where to get what from. I get a lot shipped over or I just pick up things whenever I’m there.

You've previously worked as a clothing designer for UO. How did you get into working on furniture full-time?
Well, I’m from England obviously [laughs], and in the U.K. I worked in fashion for like, ten years. In between that I did a diploma in traditional upholstery in Wales. I learned everything I needed to know about. After that, I started a side business alongside my fashion in the U.K. When the opportunity came for Urban, I just went head-first into the denim stuff because I didn’t have time for side projects. I did that for three years and it went really well, and then doing this just felt like the right thing at the right time. When I got my space here, everything all just seemed to fit. Urban has been a great company to work for because of how creative it is.







What music do you like to listen to while working?
I always like to listen to BBC Radio 6, which is a U.K. station. I always listen to that because it's familiar, and then that leads me on to other music. Generally it's just indie/folk type music. I used to be massively into music and now I like listening to it but I'm not as full-on with it [laughs].

What are your future plans with Hym Salvage?
Well, I just bought this house at the end of last year so I plan on staying here. I feel like there's a lot of opportunity here. Building the connections here for growing a business has been quite easy, and I think there's a lot of opportunity in Philadelphia as opposed to going somewhere like New York. We have a garden in the back and we plan on building a garage back there so we have a back delivery place as well and a place for bigger pieces. That's the short-term plan for now [laughs]!





Shop the HYM Salvage x Urban Renewal collection

Meet the Designer: Jason Woodside

Spend a day with artist Jason Woodside and you'll leave grinning from ear to ear. From hanging out in his color-saturated studio, to getting a caffeine fix at his new coffee shop Happy Bones, to having a cheeky glass of wine with lunch at Buvette on a Monday afternoon, the Florida-born, New York-based painter oozes good vibes. This month, Woodside collaborates with adidas on a hyper-color pop-up shop at Urban Outfitters' new Space Ninety 8 concept store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

In addition to his collaboration with Space Ninety 8, Woodside also recently lent his talent to charity, designing and hand painting a new pair of adidas Stan Smith shoes (pictured below) that are now up for auction on eBay. The proceeds from the auction will go directly to Free Arts NYC, an organization that provides underserved children and families with "a unique combination of educational arts and mentoring programs that help them to foster the self-confidence and resiliency needed to realize their fullest potential." To read our full feature on Woodside, click here.


Space Ninety 8 Market Space: Local Made


As part of Space Ninety 8 Market Space, the Local Made pop-up showcases 44 artists and designers from the Brooklyn area. Independently minded, handcrafted, and one of a kind pieces are available from the very hands that made them, with unrivaled attention to detail and craftsmanship. Below, we spotlight some of Brooklyn's independent brands and makers you'll find at Local Made. Visit Williamsburg's Space Ninety 8 to see all 44 artists under one roof or click here to read our artist feature in full.



MCMC Fragrances
Created by Anne McClain, a graduate of the Grasse Institute of Perfumery in southern France, MCMC Fragrances is a boutique fragrance brand and studio based in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.



Species by the Thousands
Founded in 2005 by Erica Bradbury, Species by the Thousands is a Brooklyn-based jewelry and lifestyle line influenced by outsider worlds.


(Photo credit: Jody Rogac)

New Friends
Established in 2012 by Alexandra Segreti and Kelly Rakowski in NYC, New Friends design and produce weavings, textiles and housewares.



Mighty Real Skin
Created out of a love for aromatherapy and skincare that's 100% natural, partners Salvador and Enrique make each of their essential oil blends in NYC in small batches.



Emily Miranda
Making her first piece in metal in 2010, Brooklyn-based Emily Miranda continues to make jewelry inspired by nature and fantastical creatures.



Datter
Created by illustrator Kaye Blegvad in 2010, Datter Industries creates subtle, narrative jewelery in an endeavor to turn drawings into wearable art.


(Photo credit: Julia Newman)

Brooklyn Herborium
Founded in South Brooklyn in 2013 by moms Molly and Emma, Brooklyn Herborium is a complete line of healthy skin care and home care products.

Studio Visit: New Friends

Using a handmade frame loom and wooden comb, Kelly Rakowski and Alex Segreti of New Friends design studio craft weavings, textiles and housewares that combine historical tradition with contemporary visual culture. We visited them at their space in downtown Brooklyn to see where they weave their magic. Read the full feature here.

Interview: Joe Segal of Pretty Snake

You've seen them on Tumblr, you've seen them on Project Runway and now you can see them all over the Urban Outfitters website! Of course we're talking about the Pretty Snake Crazy Kitty Sweaters! Here we talk to Joe Segal, the designer and man who makes those magical cat prints come to life with fuzzy sweaters and 50,000 (yes I said 50,000) googly eyes a year.

Interview by Ally Mullen

Hi Joe! Introduce yourself with a quick bio!
My name is Joseph Aaron Segal, but you can call me Joe. I'm the creator of the fashion lines Pretty Snake and World of JAS. I grew up outside of Boston, Massachusetts and eventually landed in Providence, Rhode Island where my career in textile and fashion design materialized. I work full time designing and making my fashion lines here in Providence as well as teach a computerized knitting design course at Rhode Island School of Design. 



When and how did your first "Crazy Kitty Sweater" happen?
The very first Crazy Kitty Sweater was born while I was working on my MFA in textile design at RISD. I was working on a textile collection inspired by a historical Indian tunic that was part of the RISD Museums Costume and Textiles Collection. I learned that the tunic I looking at was created to ward off the evil eye, and eventually I came to the black cat as a source of inspiration for my project. The Crazy Kitty graphic was originally a tiny painting I made inspired by an old collectible tin full of kitties and then I first knitted it as a wool dress in 2009. When I realized that knitting graphic sweaters affordably was super hard as an emerging designer, I decided to print the cats on pre-existing sweaters and that's when the phenomenon began!



Why cats? Do you have any of your own?
I love cats because they can be cute and loving while also being really weird and mysterious. Somehow, I actually don't have any cats, but my good friend — and only full-time employee — Hannah Abelow, brings her cat Pablo to visit sometimes! I like to think though, if I wasn't surrounded by kitty things all the time, I'd have some real ones.

Do you buy the decorative eyes in bulk at this point? Or are you well known at the craft store for picking them up?
I couldn't believe it, but I completely bought out my first source of cat eyes. Now I import about 50,000 cat eyes a year! 

How many goggly eyes have you ever use on one sweater?
Well, the average sweater has 16-24 eyes, but for one of my looks in my Northern Quilts collection I used about 300 eyes. The I've also made wedge shoes completely covered in kitty eyes!



Since you're known for such a unique item, how do you feel you will branch out in the future to create new, cat-free creations?
I actually have an all new cat-free collection out right now! I used cake icing to create a colorful photo realistic print collection that is available in all sorts of dresses, skirts and leggings. You can find the collection in my web stores (links below!). I'm super excited about my next collection coming out in December: it's inspired by curiosity cabinets.

Sorry we can't help ourselves: give us the dish on Project Runway!
Project Runway was just as crazy as it looks on TV! You have to think fast and be good at working with all sorts of personalities.
1. Your favorite judge: I wasn't expecting to think this, but I thought Heidi Klum was a great judge! She was always surprising me because she really appreciated the more artistic and conceptual approach to fashion design.
2. Most embarrassing moment: I feel like I'm always doing embarrassing things, we even call it "JAS-ing it up" while working at the studio, but somehow I managed to not have a stand-out embarrassing moment. I'm sure if I were to ever go on the show again I'd do some embarrassing things now that I'm comfortable with being on camera.
3. Something we might not know about the show? One of the coolest things about the show that you don't see is that a lot of us are still really close friends! Even a year later, I talk to a bunch of my fellow Season 11 cast mates regularly.

Where else can we find you on the Internet?
WORLD of JAS, Pretty Snake, and on Instagram @prettysnake!

Shop the Pretty Snake One-Of-A-Kind Crazy Kitty Sweaters

Interview: Moffat Nyangau

19-years-old Moffat Nyangau is an illustration student at Rhode Island School of Design. Moffat moved to the US as a young boy and, inspired by American cartoons, he started to draw. Last year, Moffat visited our Urban Outfitters SoHo store and ended up submitting drawings for a sketch contest at UO's Night Outinspired by our Women's Silence + Noise design Fall 2013 concept

The sweater featured in these photos come from his winning design, which (along with a cash prize) was chosen by Dossier Journal’s Polina Aronova, stylist Doria Santlofer, designer Katie Gallagher and Urban Outfitters’ very own Marissa Maximo to be turned from rough draft into reality.


Hi Moffat! Give us a description of your background.
I moved from Kenya, Africa around the year 2001 and continued to grow with the American culture, which at an early age influenced my love for art—all these new things widen my vision of what could be. Now I attend Rhode Island School of Design.

How did you get involved with the competition?
My friends and I were at UO's Night Out to see Icona Pop. While they were setting up, we went upstairs and found the competition was still going on, so I entered.

Silence + Noise X Moffat Nyangau Intarsia Knit Pullover Sweater

Describe your winning design!
It's a combination of a cat, fish scales and water. The cat would be centered, and it was also my intention to give it huge Buddha beads and added gold to make it look very ancient and majestic.

What was your initial reaction when you heard you won?
It was a lot more than I could handle! It was just another regular day of me checking my mail. It took a couple of minutes to register that I had won, which isn’t something I thought would happen. I walked around the room cheering, but no actual words coming out, rolling my arm in the air.



What's your personal style like?
I’ve grown in style of what I’ve worn over the years after having seen what other is out there, from what was only limited to me. I'm an Urban dresser. I wear anything from my granddad's sweaters to Obey and Stussy. The kinds of shirts I like to wear are simple and less graphic. I’m still trying to find new styles that are better than the last, while still maturing with my age — I can’t dress the same way forever.

What's your dream label to design for?
Obey. I love the color choices, which influence me in a lot of ways as an artist.

What do you want to do in the future?
Illustration for a published comic book company, which is something I really want to accomplish—specifically drawing for a continuing Superman story and some of it's covers. I love to create from my mind and create stories. Animation would be next in line — being able to bring ideas to life. My goal is to spread the magic of art to another child, like it was to me. Thanks to constantly watching Dragonball Z, my love for art grew into every form. 

Be honest. Are you going to buy the sweater?
Without question. Seeing something I have made displayed in Urban Outfitters is an achievement worthy of doing so. 

Moffat's Original Design  
Why would you want to collaborate with Urban Outfitters?
"I would like to introduce people to my unique sense of style, so that I'm not the only one dressing like this."

Found Objects by Randall Cleaver


(Photo by Maddie Flanigan)

On display now at The Gallery at 543 (5000 S. Broad St.) in Philadelphia is the exhibit Found Objects by Randall Cleaver.

As a sculpture student who graduated from Penn State in 1981, Randall became accustomed to using found and salvaged pieces in his art, and that tradition has carried into his current work. On display at 543 are some of Randall's amazing clock sculptures, made completely from found or salvaged materials. Most of the clocks also have a component that moves; the slinky on the clock above is shifted from hand to hand, and the grim reaper clock (below) has a pendulum and moving arm piece.

They're so, so much fun to look at, so if you find yourself in Philadelphia, make sure you check out the exhibition! It will be up for the remainder of the month. —Katie













MacPaint 2013

WAH, remember MacPaint? From like, the Jurassic era of computers? It's here! On the 2013 internet! Look at that shadow font! SO MANY NOSTALGIA EMOTIONS COURSING THROUGH MY BODY OVER THIS!

This is great. I'm either going to get really good at computer drawing in black and white, or I'm just going to write "POOP" and "BUTT" in shadow font all day long, because it looks so neat. —Katie
(via The Hairpin)


Friday the 13th Tattoos

Ben Kopp

It's Friday the 13th so you know what that means... it's time to dig through your couch and old purses for some change to take to TD Bank, so you can scrounge up enough money to get a $13 tattoo of something FT13th-inspired!  


We know tattoos last like, a really long time or whatever, so to make it easier for you to choose on this super-duper-stitious day, our lovely team in the art department have provided us with awesome designs to share with you! 

It's simple: Just print one of these bad boys out, take it to your local parlor, and get it tattooed on you! We suggest your face as the best possible spot.

P.S. If you DO happen to get one done, please send us an email of it at blog@urbanout.com! —Ally

This tattoo will remain timeless as your body withers away and dies.

And it's only 13 calories!

What a tough pussy.

BOOOOoOOOoOOoooooOOo!


I feel like I just lost 10 years of my life by just POSTING this last one.

Ben Sifel
2 cute 2 resist. Seriously, try to tell me with a straight face you don't want this right now.

NYFW: Backstage with Katie Gallagher


(Photos via Katie McCurdy)

Walking down the stairs to the basement lounge at The Raven (55 Gansevoort St.), I could just FEEL that I was in Katie Gallagher's presence. Or, at least, I felt like I was walking around in a place that lived in a far corner of her mind. The lights were dim, the walls were covered in soft velvet, and everywhere you turned you were blinded by a bright stage light or the gaze of an ethereal being (hint: model) lounging on black leather couches, picking away at bowls of candy corn. It was official: photographer Katie McCurdy and I had landed smack-dab in the middle of the backstage preparations for Katie Gallagher's New York Fashion Week presentation.






I met Katie the last week in August. She invited me over to her apartment in Chinatown for a photo shoot and interview with her for a UO At Home feature (coming this October and shot by Bobby Whigham!). I had come baring T-shirt samples—they were soft, dainty and delightfully covered in Halloween-themed drawings done by the host herself.  We were photographing the Katie Gallagher X UO Collection for the first time since their creation.




Fast-forward two weeks as we were happily photographing the collection on a group of models, hand-picked to display the T-shirts as a tribute to their unique looks. After shooting a few of our favorite girls, we walked upstairs to the presentation. As we waited behind thick curtains, we anxiously awaited to see what laid ahead of us. Although we watched as each model was individually scurried up the stairs after finishing hair and makeup, we were still blown away when the curtains opened.




As we took a step forward, the air was filled with the scent of fresh flowers. The room was light and pleasant, and you were immediately greeted by a row of models, lined up one by one, each in beautifully fitting ivory, pink and black fabric ranging from sheer bodysuits to full-length dresses; leather bra tops to lacy skirts. Katie Gallagher's SS14 Collection Bloom was certainly as beautiful as it's name would suggest. 




From my first meeting with Katie, I feel I had watched her bloom myself—from a quiet girl answering the door, smiling warmly while answering questions about her family, and eventually laughing into the night as we ate tacos and drank margaritas; to a woman, standing strong and proud in the back of the room, watching the camera bulbs flashing upon her hard work as the crowd packed the room in awe, once again, of what she had created. Our acquaintanceship, though brief and business-based, gave me a sense of what Katie Gallagher is really like, and the greatness she is capable of.





A special thanks to our hosts Katie Gallagher and Chesley with One PR for letting us get in the way of things and be a part of such a special day. —Ally

Want more? Shop the Katie Gallagher X UO Collection and keep a look out for our UO At Home feature with Katie during the month of October!

Kelly Shami

Upon opening up Kelly Shami's website, I ever-so-eloquently exclaimed, "Yo, whaaaaat? This shit is soooo dooooope!" I scrolled through her website, jaw dropped and drooling, as I laid my lazy eyes on some of the coolest jewelry I've seen on the web. I don't know Miss Shami personally, but I imagine we'd get along swimmingly due to her perfectly picked (and wearable) pop-culture references.

This New York designer's work is full of creativity, fun and has a unique twist that most brands are missing these days. If what they say is true—that what you wear is a reflection of yourself—then give me a second while I pile on everything Kelly has ever created. This girl has got my vibe down to a T. here's no doubt that wearing jewelry this cool will leave a lasting impression, so ask yourself: how do you want to be remembered?

As for me, I'd just like y'all to know I am for real... foreva. Foreva eva? Foreva eva! —Ally



The Pop-Up Institute for Craft and Ingenuity at Space 15 Twenty


In the pop-up space at Space 15 Twenty (1520 N. Cahuenga Blvd) this month, you'll find a whole new creative experience, presented by Hand-Eye Supply. During the rest of August through the first few weeks of September, Hand-Eye Supply, a retail store from Portland, Oregon that focuses on helping communities design and work together creatively, will be taking over the space to open The Pop-Up Institute for Craft & Ingenuity.

This new shop will be stocked with crafting and DIY supplies and tools, plus throughout the month there will be educational opportunities and events that Hand-Eye calls "a physical manifestation of our aspirations." Sounds pretty cool, right? If you're ready to get your DIY on and let those creative juices go wild, attend the opening party this Friday, August 16th at Space 15 Twenty from 6pm to 9pm! There will be live letterpress printing by Tabletop Made, and music by Neil Schield of Origami Vinyl. RSVP here. Maddie

Dream Catcher and Feather Shorts by reMusedClothing


These Dream Catcher and Feather shorts are fucking rad! Designed and hand bleached by reMusedClothing, an Etsy clothing line based out of Hawaii, these high waisted shorts will have your booty catching more than just dreams, IF YOU KNOW WHAT I'M SAYIN'. —Ally

Interview: COPE2 on the Obey x COPE2 Takeover

COPE2 has teamed up with his buddies at Obey to bring you a new collection sold exclusively at Urban Outfitters, titled Obey x COPE Takeover, which is inspired by his past, his friendship with Shepard and NYC street art.
Interview by Lorin Brown


Who were your peers/collaborators coming up as a writer?

It was the NYC subways that got me into being a graffiti writer and my cousin who also tagged his name up in the late '70s. Man, those subway cars had some amazing art painted on them and I always wanted to put my name on them as well and see my name "COPE2" roll through all the five boroughs of NYC. They were like moving museums of art. What a great time; good memories.




When you first started showing in galleries what was the transition like going from writing and painting on walls to creating work meant to be viewed in a art shows?
The Christie's Guernsey Auction in 1999 in NYC was having a huge graffiti art sale and I was contacted by them to submit some pieces. I never really did my art on canvas, but I heard this was a huge thing so I submitted three paintings and two sold for a pretty good price. I was surprised, so that's what pretty much got me started and going into the direction of doing galleries. I was getting a bit too old to be painting on trains and walls and I've been really successful in doing so worldwide in galleries, museums, auctions and private collections.

Do you find a lot has changed in your gallery work since then? In process or otherwise?
Yes for sure. When you're a graffiti artist, you're more into your original style with lettering. Now that I'm doing my art on canvas, I focus more on making it a real authentic painting which I go beyond just doing wild style graffiti letters. I do more mixed media with my paintings which look really amazing.




What outside of graffiti influences you?
Just great energy, great people, good music, my partner, Indie 184, my kids, my family, good vibes, positive energy, and even negative energy sometimes can influence an artist on their work.

What other artists are you into right now outside of graffiti?
I love Jean Michel Basquiat's work. One of my idols is Keith Harring—another amazing artist. I love Pablo Piccasso, KAWS, Kenny Scharf, Shepard Fairey, Swoon, Fafi, Mr. Brainwash, José Parlá. I love all of their work, it's so inspiring.




How did you meet Shepard Fairey?
I've known Shepard Fairey for a while now. We both were legendary characters in Marc Eckō's video game called Getting Up: Contents Under Pressure! So we've always spoke about doing something together which I though was a brilliant idea and we finally came together and making it happen.

How did this new collection with Obey come about?
Steve from Obey approached me during Art In The Streets in the private opening reception at the L.A. MOCA and I was like, "Sure why not? Let's make it happen." And we just kept in contact through email concerning the project and we're here now and it looks amazing. I love it—another great Obey and COPE2 collaboration.



Can you tell us a little bit about the photographic tee?
Yes, that's an original picture I took of my piece painted on an NYC subway car back in 1983 and I loved how if you look you can see the buildings in the background and I knew if Obey was around back then pasting his iconic image he wouldve pasted it on the top of one of the buildings, so we did it in photoshop. It looked perfect and was such a great idea, plus they loved it as well so we went forward with it. 

Do you have any other shows or collaborations coming up that you'd like to talk about?
I'm working on several group shows here in NYC at the Krause Gallery and the Jonathan Levine Gallery for July and August, then a solo art show in Köln (Cologne), Germany with Ruttkowski 68 Gallery September 6, and more solo shows in London, Detroit, and Paris this year. So, I'm pretty much busy which is good and I'm grateful. 




Where can we find you online?
You can check me out on my site at website or my Instagram @mrcope2. Thank you!



July Guest Blogger: Christina Mullen

Christina Mullen is a creative writer, costume designer and comic book lover hailing from UO's hometown of Philadelphia. She's also my sister. As you can tell from the photo above, her love for comics started at an early age. As she got older, it became her "thing," and I began to be dragged into "just one more" comic book shop for her to browse in as she picked out crazy cool comics I never even knew existed.


Currently, she works in the criminal justice field and I'm pretty sure that after hours she gets revenge on the criminals she encounters by fighting crime in the tough streets of Philly, dressed in one of her amazing hand-made superhero costumes, disguised under the name "The Law." For the month of July she'll be sharing her extensive knowledge with us, proving that all you need to conquer the comic world are the books, the brains and yes, a cape. —Ally